Monthly Archives: December 2019

Artist Spotlight: Nora Manthei

Nora believes there are two kind of artists. There are the ones whom always knew they wanted to be an artist and the ones who had experiences which gradually revealed an artistic pathway. Her mother is an art teacher so she had a mix of the two above. She was always looking at coffee table books of important artists and wanted to become a painter because it was easy for her to understand what a painter does. Slowly she understood that for her there was more to working in art. It could be a form of language.

After finishing high school, she had the idea that one should already be a big artist. Obviously that was not the case, so then she supported this idea by studying art history in Leipzig. This too was not highly satisfying either so she started studying in Weimar Bauhaus University in the field of art. This was much closer to what she was seeking as she had the mind space to concentrate on her projects regarding the city and the lessons.

After Weimar, she continued studying in Halle, and from there she did an Erasmus exchange in Vienna. This was a turning point for me,” Nora says. Up to this point she was working with every type of materials and the centre of the works were all political subjects and always about moral issues. Vienna helped her to stop packing her idea and giving it to people to unpack it.  She started telling stories and writing down. She decided that she didn’t want to work with the topics that are chosen, rather the things that she had experienced herself.

The matters that you are confronted with in daily routine is Nora’s focus. She prefers to work with topics that are familiar to viewers so there is a common theme to connect with. She doesn’t think it is reasonable to make art for a small group of people who are highly educated and reference it in a way that is not readable for everyone.

Nora has her studio in an old factory. It’s a shared art space in the east of Leipzig. It’s like a collective but everyone works independently. It is the conversations, events and shared space that makes it feel like a collective.

At the moment she is working a lot with texts and typography. She has made several books. However sometimes she goes back to conceptual work like the works she displayed in the first show of the PK RD41, including writing sentences and crossing them out again.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

In addition, she does lots of photography. “Most probably every photographer experiences that moment when she blames herself for not carrying the camera with herself and loses a great shot, but when you are working with text, you have your mind always with you, You just need a pen and a piece of paper,” Nora says. Nora believes you shouldn’t put your emphasis on working with a certain media. You have to stay open to change.

“it is the most important thing for an artist not to keep repeating herself just because it’s going well and selling well.”

Artist Statement: Doubting and transforming is my process. My way of working is constantly complemented by various techniques and media, which are based on the content and emerging of piece. Since 2017 I have been working mostly with text and its interaction with pictures. These works are beginnings or fragments that can be described as a kind of everyday archeology. Out of overcoming distance and immersion into a matter, an alienation irrevocably follows. The constant back and forth is essential to be able to look from the self to the subject. For me, a work of art really only exists when it has entered the world of images of the beholder. Art is for me a connecting and supportive element to make the complexity of the present tangible. Art challenges, questions and does not give in.


written by Elnaz Mostaan

you can look at Nora’s website for more of her work

And come see her work in the following show

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

Curator Spotlight: Patricia Brien

Curating is a relatively new path for Patricia Brien, but it has been in development for a long time. Our Curator has an extensive experience in the academic field. Having taught in several universities at principal and senior lecturer levels and being employed in academic management positions, she knows how to organise and structure matters. Even in her speech this quality is recognisable, Patricia’s sentences are thought through. She is not afraid to take a deliberate pause to find the right word that will pierce through. Also, her approach to curation presents quiet moments for artistic thought. When conducting curation process, she believes in giving freedom to create. Observing the participants, Patricia detects connecting points within the group and thereafter forms a wireframe for a coherent exhibition.

An underlaying theme for this curator is human position in relationship to the inhuman, such as animals, plants and the unseen such as air and particles. She is inspired by neo-paganist love for rituals and storytelling, appreciating existing customs as well as creating new narratives, assigning meaning to objects and acts of no significance. Patricia Brien prefers site-specific work. This involves going outside and working with others or bringing the outside world inside. This Curator’s creative practice employs a two directional approach. Using both top-down and bottom-up strategies, Patricia can introduce efficiency within the group dynamics, simultaneously encouraging exchange of opinions and 2-way learning.

Patricia Brien is a lifelong learner and traveller. She has lectured and curated student work in numerous institutions, on different continents. Our curator has been exposed to numerous fields of study, though a lurking theme has been the fashion industry- covering fashion shows in Paris, investigating and incorporating sustainable and ethical fashion design. Her passion is textile art. Textile art is still an underrated art form, historically discriminated and dogmatised by the art world because it has been defined by the patriarchal canon as incapable of conceptual content due its historical connection with women.

The stay in Leipzig has given Patricia a taste for residencies, although she has previously taken part in several others, currently she is looking forward to producing her own work as well as creating community engagement projects with other artists.

Patricia Brien is a person who is always becoming, constantly doing something new. She considers daily rituals as an important means to centre oneself. She believes that throughout life we can continue to change and develop. Otherwise it’s boring.

written by Agnes


Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

Artist Spotlight: Wim Warrink

Wim does not call himself an artist. He believes that it is a title to be earned and it is a lifelong objective. Wim’s stance is that one should think for oneself, doing things just for the sake of it. Even if it is bad or stupid, if it makes you happy, do it. It is never about success. Afterall success is something other people project on you.

It is safe to say that this Dutch artist is a doer, not a talker. You won’t find him elaborating and building skyscraper concepts just to tick industry boxes or please someone.
This doesn’t mean that his work is without conceptual depth. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. Wim presents a clear message and gives a distinctive direction on how to interpret it, without tautologies. He delivers – a concept and excellent craftsmanship, showcasing his engineering skills and technical knowledge. If you don’t see it, move on.

Wim’s path to the art was not without detours. He studied and worked as an electrician. Feeling unfulfilled, he took a career advisory test that suggested he should follow a creative path or work with animals. This lead Wim to start studying industrial design. He put in rigorous work, but yet again he didn’t feel comfortable in a field that fuels mass production and unreasonable consumption.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

It was at S.M.A.K museum in Ghent that he was first exposed to Arte Povera. The art of Bernd Lohaus and Giovanni Anselmo struck him. He sat in front of Bernd’s Lohaus piece for a good half an hour, taking in impressions, breathing in the material. The realisation came that Art is what Wim wants to do. The impression was such a powerful one that his entrance essay for the Academy of Arts was about Giovanni Anselmo and Wim’s graduation work displays strong influences of his work. .

Wim Warrink’s work has a certain rawness and tension to it. Like Don Quixote, Wim is engaged in a constant battle. His machines embody power, movement, direction and time. This artist has a comfortable relationship with time. He accepts it for what it is. He resists the need for instantaneity. He slowly appreciates the moment, though also understands that good things do not come tout de suite. Wim stresses the importance of taking breaks to enjoy life – they are crucial to break up a jammed thought process, find the last piece of a puzzle or to be inspired.

His work does reference time a lot, but without trying to grasp the concept of infinity. When engineering Wim only integrates found parts, from streets and flea markets. The machinery is a fusion of spare parts with each piece having a unique backstory. His engines are thought through and a result of plenty hours of laborious work and history, but made to do what Wim wants them to do – here and now. At the end of the day it does make sense:  Machines doing things for you – equals more time to do things you love, be creative.

Currently this artist has embarked on a year-long nomadic journey, in which he will be participating in different art residencies around Europe. We are happy to know that PK is his first stop and Wim is inspired by Leipzig and its industrial and coal mining industry scenes. PK wishes Wim the best of luck and a lot of joyful experiences in the near future.

written by Agnes

Wim Warrink’s website and Instagram.


Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artists Spotlight: Andrius Ivanovas

“mgmn (brand-pseudonym) has a broader soul than “Tik-Tok’s” servers. He admires Joji, social events that usually don’t fit into arrangements. mgmn is excited by “sadgasm”, “banshee”, “this cat is chonky” facebook’s groups, Playboi carti, lil Uzi Vert music, likes “Pusheen” kitten and would like to see rapper Tay-k from Tarrant jail released because mgmn loves the machine guns on western shopping carts in Muslim countries. Kuwait’s fields of burning oil are still more impressive than the speeches of climate change protesters, virtual pokemon characters created to be much more cute than any human being near, events that create emptiness faster than fill it, which are charming as much as can give sincere joy and allow life to manifest. mgmn loves these times,” written by Andrius.

Andrius is the one behind “Mega man”, which is an unofficial brand for life style. How it offers lifestyle is not by producing clothes and accessories, but instead it forms people’s lifestyle by thematizing questions. Megaman is not a normal person, he is a thing you can hide your personality behind, and feel safe with it.

The phrase “mega man” has long been in existance. It came to Andrius’ attention through Tay-K’s song which is say’s “shine like mega man”. Andrius thinks the reason he recognizes his artistic side with a brand is his geographical origin. Being on the edge of eastern and western culture and growing up in that sort of vacuum makes you think who and where you are and in what kind of historical period you live.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

“If you ask me what makes me do art, I will say: I don’t know!” says Andrius. When the search to find answers to his unknown questions pushed him to spend time in the silence and height of the mountains, what he found in himself, was his grandfather. He says his grandfather was always happy. He was a big role model for him. He sees a relation between happiness and having time.

Andrius did his academic studies in sculpture. During his studies he won the Baltic youth award in painting. The painting was the reduced and minimalized image of the grandfather’s bookshelf. With this achievement he won a residency in Norway.

His path of art style developed over the years. Small objects found their way to his paintings. The details of the paintings faded away and colors only stayed. He made bigger sculptures and smaller paintings. He experienced and flowed from 3 meters high painting to really tiny ones.

At the moment medium is not playing a big role in the identity of mgmn’s art work, it can be a mix of aerodynamics equation with a H&M t-shirt. What matters is the philosophical sight and point of view that he has in that time period.

Written by Elnaz Mostaan

images supplied by the artist


for more of mgmn’s work you are welcome to the following exhibitions:

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Cecilia Klementsson

Cecilia resisted becoming an artist for a long time, but in the end she realized that she was just rebelling against her family. They encouraged her painting. She says she was always busy drawing something as a child and always had her best marks in art classes with not much of effort. She opted for something more challenging: natural science. However, she found herself painting in all of her free time and picking art classes. It was then that she really noticed how much she enjoys it and couldn’t imagine herself doing anything else.

Life took Cecilia from Sweden to Australia and she started her studies in Fine Art in Perth. “The most isolated and the sunniest city in the world,” Cecilia says. In Perth the base of her current technique of painting formed: having four colours and applying one at a time instead of using a pallet to mix all the colours. Cecilia compares her style of painting with a printer in terms of applying each colour in separate layers. She really wants to extract all the colours that you see on the skin so they lay on the top of each other, like how the impressionists did. This is how she avoids painting dull or flat bodies. Her self-limitations gave her the challenge to go for painting meatier and fleshier instead of plastic images.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Painting nudes was always one of Cecilia’s favourites. Jenny Saville is a painter that Cecilia admires. She believes her journey from Sweden to Australia, and the difference of the attitudes towards nudity in these two country triggered something in her. As well she secretly laughs at the fact that she like to give a little back to women who paint nudes

She started looking at nudes in advertisements in more detail. How are they getting away with that much of nudity? Commercially being beautiful. but at the same time pale and innocent and not erotic. So she decided to take normal people and put them in perfect posing of advertisement. but not with the porcelain airbrush look. Instead they are fleshy and real. This was for her the indication that people are still beautiful despite the real magenta and green shadows their skin naturally have.

Another concept that Cecilia is playing around is that what happens when a man poses in a feminine way or even a trans woman poses in a masculine way. What is man? What is woman? Where is the line in this spectrum? Plus, the fact that masculine and feminine codes change throughout history. “There is a lot of gender attached to the pose, and the way someone act and the body language,” Cecilia says.

The fact that advertisement is selling sex doesn’t draw Cecilia to it. At the same time she acknowledges that it takes talent to create such a beautiful visual thing. She is also fascinated that contemporary advertisements are being more inclusive and representative with different shapes of body and skin colours. The ads she uses are generally from the 90s.

Come see how Cecilia crushes gender borders with her paintings. You will see her self-portrait posing like a male Calvin Klein perfume advertisement model and a trans woman posing as Eva Mendez in the final show of round 41.

Written by Elnaz Mostaan

images supplied by artist


You can find Cecilia’s art works in her website.

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00


Press while here at Pilotenkueche:

MEDIUM

Beyond ‘Hypezig’: Connecting international artists in eastern Germany
by Benedict Tetzlaff-Deas

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Magazine 43
Issue 8

Artist Spotlight: Tamara Jacquin

Tamara always starts her work with the human body, its senses and experiences. She is convinced that the human body carries both carnal experience as well as emotional heritage. In her work she explores human emotions and basic needs, whilst keeping in mind our natural bond with the natural world and need for a shelter.

The artist works extensively with natural landscapes, trying to bring them into the city environment. Hence materials used may be site-specific or selected to evoke and recreate a certain sensation. She works largely with wood, steel and silk, but also integrates plants and even her own hair. Tamara’s work is mainly three-dimensional, but includes photography and poetry. She believes that poetry is a great outlet of the soul and it helps to look deeply within. Tamara writes her own poetry and appreciates the works of Alejandra Pizarnik and Raúl Zurita.

Before turning to Fine Arts, she completed architectural studies. Though the artist found herself unhappy within the architectural field, there are clear traces of it in her art practice. A good representation of her personal journey is a series called “Body architecture” which showcases the process and struggles she accumulated in this quest as well as the questions she had posed. How do we build ourselves? What constructs us? Which constructions repress us? How do we navigate social canons; what society expects from a woman; all the standardised norms one must comply with in addition to the baggage of one’s family history.

Tamara searched for answers in nature. She used her art practice as an outlet to tell her story as well as to declare her artist manifesto. We are animals that come from the wilderness and we shouldn’t lose this bond with it. The artist continues to explore this question and is playing with an idea of a refuge. An intimate shelter that allows a person to think and connect with surroundings, earth, sky and oneself.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

When recounting her latest piece, she speaks of an inner sensation she felt when standing in front of a tree, that which cannot be described in words. Artists stresses: “You can feel it and not intellectually perceive it.” Her piece is a memory of an encounter with the landscape. When speaking of her artwork Tamara says: “It is a dream, it’s not a construct. As a dream it doesn’t have to be perfect!” Accordingly, her work has an airy quality to it, allowing space for free interpretation, encouraging the viewer to use their own imagination to awaken their senses.

Tamara says that she could easily spend a whole day in repose, simply visualising, thinking and examining a concept. When she has solved the puzzle in her head, she starts the execution. Tamara grew up as an only child and she spent a lot of time in her fantasy world, imagining things and playing on her own. Also, today her ideas are born in the same way; an artist desires to fuel the imagination of the viewer. This artist wishes to bring them closer to the nature, even if it is just in their own imagination.

photos supplied by artist

For more information and visual insight head over to Tamara’s website.

Lichtspiel des Westens

film: Entrepasos
Karl Heine
Saturday 7 December 2019
16.00 – 22.00

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig