In progress: Unfinished Hase

Unfinished Hase questions familiar everyday elements and turns them on their heads.  Come and get a glimpse into the unfinished processing of ideas, methods, and dialogues of the PK artists of round 38 as individuals and as a whole.

Only a couple of days into the new year, 16 artists, four assistants and one emerging curator arrived from the four corners of the world. As PK tradition has it, they gathered in the warmth of the studios to chose titles for the two shows for this round. This was the first task they completed as a group and it was a daunting one since they don’t know each other yet. It came when one is trying to adjust to a new home, new studio, and new group.  Some names were chosen based on the sound, some by their meaning, but as always, the two exhibition titles were selected by vote.


all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Now, halfway through the three month residency, we invite you to the first of two exhibitions by round 38, Unfinished Hase. Throughout art history, the hare has been a symbol with various mythological meanings, depending on the context of culture and beliefs. One such meaning is that of artist. Driven out of the comforts of familiarity, our resident artists have worked hard for the last six weeks to situate themselves in the given circumstances of the city, the studio, and the people around them.  With the varying art practices, the objects, the materials and dialogues, the organic turned constructed; the constructed a playground; the playground violent; the violent a part of nature; the nature mirroring we humans; the humans painted; the painted distorted; the distorted controlled; and the controlled released into the subconscious and symbolic.  


written by mihyun maria kim

Unfinished Hase


Vernissage:  
15.02.19, 19h
Performance 20h:
Eliana Jacobs and Dilara Womens Choir (Choir Director: Walbuga Walde)
Performance 21h:
Eliana Jacobs and Ben Osbourn


Open:  
16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 
23.02.19 19h
Location: 

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

______________________________________________________________________________

International residents

A L Kleiner 
(Painting, Installation; Sydney, Australia)

Amanda Struver 
(Interdisciplinary:Syracuse, NY, United States)

Ana Castillo 
(Illustration, Painting, Animation: Paris, France)

Atsuko Mochida 
(Installation, Site-specific Installation, Public Art : Tokyo, Japan) 

Ece Canguden
(Painting, Sculpture: Istanbul, Turkey)

Eliana Jacobs 
(Etching, Objects, Collage, Conceptual: Vancouver, BC, Canada)

Isabelle Kuzio
(Video, sculpture, painting, installation: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada)

Jose Sarmiento
(Painting, Drawing, Etching: Bucaramanga, Columbia)

Charles Park
(Photography: New York, NY, US)

Marloes Staal
(Sculpture, Photography, Drawing: Enschede, Netherlands)

Ludmila Hrachovinova 
(Painting: Bratislava, Slovakia / Stockholm, Sweden)

Roman Bicek
(Painting, Collage: Bratislava, Slovakia)

Tomas Orrego Gianella
(Video, Installation, Collage: Lima, Peru)

Valentine Emilia Bossert
(Drawing, Printmaking, Sculpture, Video, Installation: Geneva, Switzerland)


Local Participants

Henrike Pilz 
(Mixed Media; Leipzig, Germany)

Paul Altmann 
(Conceptual Art, Photography, Video, Installation: Leipzig, Germany)


Curator

Tena Bakšaj 
(Zagreb, Croatia)

Assistants

Ciara Brown
(Fine Art, Multi-media: Burnley, UK)

Samra Šabanović 
(Photography, Visual Culture: Helsinki, Finland / Sarajevo, B&H)

Maria Valcarcel Maceira 
(Art History: A Estrada, Spain)

Mihyun Maria Kim 
(Painting, Drawing; Toronto, Canada)

PK Artistic Director and Coordinator

maeshelle west-davies
(Performance, Time-based media, Installation: US/UK/DE

Artist spotlight: Henrike Pilz

Henrike struggled not to be an artist. As a daughter of a woman painter, she was aware of the problems of being a woman artist. Studying history was a compromise, and it did not make her happy. Finally, this German made up her mind to become what her body asked for. Her artist career commenced with realistic painting, which she finds as a “pure imitation, a matter of practice, you don’t need to think”. As this became insufficient, she researched the historical movements and aesthetics to discover her own voice.

Painting in her life is an impulsive act and way to clear out her thoughts. When in act, she enters into a trance where thinking becomes easier. Henrike is inspired with the pictorial process itself where she thinks not only with her hands, but where her artwork is also intuitive.

Cy Trombly, Joseph Beuys, Silvia Baechli, Marcel Duchamp; the main sources of influence for Henrike Pilz are evident when looking at her work. She is attracted to art concepts and changing state of mind through art; primarily her own and hopefully awareness of the public. Not far away from working led by intuition, Pilz wants her vision to stay focused on the concept.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Ever since she was a child, her mind was full of ideas and questions. Finally, the grown up child took the path of the research, providing a way for the curiosity to be shared. One of her purpose is to make art for the society as a place for empathy.

When the idea comes, Henrike feels that something is sprouting within her. The only way of inspiration is having time for herself. In a Pollock-style, Pilz takes the ground as her canvas and blends the colors from different color cans which are her primary tools. Whilst she uses this instrument to display her interior world, the whole process is developed in a slow way of repetitive looking and painting. The main tool is the can, the second is the paint brush reserved for the details. The constant in this process is the frankness and clarity.

The artist is not working only in this medium. In 2016 a documentary movie “XXS – decompose, a strategy”, made by Henrike and her team, was released. It was about the DDR- System. The country, the socialism east Germany in times of the iron curtain. The movie was based on interviews with four people talking about their personal lives.

Contrary to the institutional idea of having idols instead of artists, the real success for Henrike is to develop herself through art, to be comfortable with herself and have a peaceful mind. Impressing and inspiring people with her abstract paintings would be yet another success.

Written by María Valcárcel

______________________________________________________________________________

Come and see Henrike’s works in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Performances: from 20h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: Eliana Jacobs

Passing behind the translucent curtains, we enter in Eliana’s studio. The curtains mimic what is taking shape behind them: this place condenses Eliana’s thoughts. In the words of Virgina Woolf in “A Room of One’s Own”, Eliana takes the room for her own fruitful place of creation. Subtlety, calmness and awareness; these are the constants in her vision. However, her peace is intermingled with one of the unknown passions. Secretly being a metalhead, she admits that there are ironic connections to her reflective and contemplative art.

Belonging to a Jewish family, she went to a course focused on traditional Jewish art where she discovered papercutting. This practice became part of her work due to its meditative and tactile qualities. Since then, she has used this technique as a manner of appreciation of the Jewish culture, her own history and as a tool for self-examination.

The grandchild of three Holocaust survivors and the great-grandchild of victims murdered by the Nazis, Eliana has decided to research the Holocaust for her artwork. She has grown up experiencing the inter-generational effects of this historical trauma.

The project that she is doing in Pilotenkueche is called Re-Emergence. It examines the re-growth of plants on the sites of former concentration camps. This project incorporates research about the histories, constructions, and locations of the camps, in addition to contemporary protocols for the preservation of the sites. With the research she will produce a series of papercut-collages inspired by her findings. Among the layers of meaning of this project, she asks the question:

How can we allow plants, forest, and natural landscape reclaim their territories whilst not letting them conceal the atrocities that occurred on that same land?

All photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Eliana is a very multi-faceted individual with a thirst for a complete experience. This lead her to, among other things, gymnastics. Not being a tough competitive person, she decided to give up on gymnastics lessons and find another love- the circus. She finds circus a perfect platform for artistic self-exploration and analysis of the movement and body. Her purpose in development is to incorporate the circus with the rest of her art practices.

Eliana’s path to art was somehow a parental influence. As a 2-year-old, her mother introduced her to art of Monet. Later she would listen to Bach with her father. As an art history graduate, accumulated knowledge and interest in Medieval art, Baroque, Impressionism would later influence her practice.

Whilst conversing with Beau Dick [a Kwakwaka’wakw (North-West Coast Indigenous) hereditary chief and artist] about relevance of language, and its relationship with culture, she was asked, “And you, do you speak your language?” This was the moment she realized that her inability to speak Yiddish distanced her from her own culture. Soon after, she began creating research-based art about her family and Jewish history.

Eliana defends art as a irrefutable educative instrument, where old knowledge is unlearned, and new intertwined. This artist devotes a lot of time in her day to thought. In her universe between the curtains, every little detail has its reason to be. Her method of working is based on repeated reflection and contemplation. Rather than giving answers, she poses questions to the viewer. These questions are not to be answered necessarily, but considered. Dialogue, contact, spreading tolerance and cultural diversity are some of her own personal answers, at least.

Currently, she is collaborating on a music project with Ben Osborn (Jewish, UK based in Berlin). With his electronic music background and her classically trained voice, they are reinterpreting traditional Yiddish songs into the contemporary. We are pleased to have them perform at the vernissage of Unfinished Hase, 15 February at Alte Handelsschule.

In Leipzig in general and in Pilotenkueche in particular, Eliana is eager to keep the research alive and open, with the aim to get closer to understanding present occurrences, and keep finding out who she is.

And you, would you also like to see through the curtain?

Written by María Valcárcel


______________________________________________________________________________

Come experience Eliana’s performance and other works in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Performances: from 20h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany



Artist spotlight: Ece Canguden

Plastic objects seduce Ece on her every day walk. When one proves to be desirable, she takes it back to her studio. There, she transforms it into organic forms, building multiple layers by adding and distorting, playing with fire and water, pushing and pulling with her hands.  

Ece studied to become an architect. Years of working in an office under strict guidelines and balancing symmetric square forms created the need to have an outlet where she could have complete control. She began to work more intuitively, playing with materials, creating organic shapes and natural colours. She started to paint abstract spaces resembling cosmic explosions and dark holes.

The dark uncomfortable matter peaked her interests- the insides being exposed into the outer layers, showing a depth, the hidden, the deep mystery, like a secret slowly being revealed:  something curious that uncomfortably exists, seeming not to belong. The state of the people back home in Turkey, she explains, is that one cannot easily show emotions or reactions to current political events.  This bottling up, holding in fear and anger has created a visible uncomfortable state.

 all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

“Weird!” is what we call something that seems wrong or should not exist, not here anyway.  Mark Fisher’s book, The Weird and The Eerie, influences Ece’s perspective on the state of her nation and of individuals, but she knows how to balance it out, between the serious and playful. She knows when to allow thoughts in and when to keep them out. She has a fascination for the body, especially the mouth- where things enter and are then digested- and the eyes that take in all that is in front of them and which also signifies being watched.

In her studio, in Leipzig, she has gathered more toys than usual. The colours of the objects have transitioned from black to red and now to pink, resembling flesh and all its connotations.  She plays with the colour and layers a certain level of sexuality through the use of feminine forms without being obvious. The use of something playful and something dangerous, working through control and with chance, perhaps comes from her Gemini spirit.

Chance and Coincidence take on key roles in her process, and throughout the next couple of months, Ece will continue to test the limits. How far is too far for her materials? At what point does her manipulation rob them of their essence? Do the objects of the city gain from being part of the greater cosmos Ece is creating? How will she be influenced by her peers in an open studio environment and the personal exploration of all that she discovers?

written by mihyun maria kim

______________________________________________________________________________

Come and see what Ece creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: Atsuko Mochida


People are invited to a small room. They are asked to expand the space by pushing the wall. Unbeknownst to them, behind the wall there is a bedroom. The moving wall displaces each piece of furniture and collapses the private space. As people push the wall, they can hear that something moves, falls and smashes. After shattered glasses and spilled water are cluttered on the floor, they can go behind the wall and understand what has taken place.

“Push the Wall” by Japanese artist Atsuko Mochida reveals her current artistic practice. Visitors are often encouraged to participate in space changing installations that question the notion of public and private, provoking a wide range of reactions.

For her 2017 project, called The revolving house of T., she cut out a portion of her grandmother’s house in Mito, Japan to create a revolving central area. Visitors can rotate the structure by pushing the walls. By the constant exchange of interior and exterior or public and private, she wanted to activate the house and change the energy, transforming a structure into a human body, while at the same time questioning the structure of one family.

All photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Before finding her own place between architecture and art, Atsuko studied Japanese traditional painting at Musashino Art University in Tokyo. Most of her colleagues were painting in a traditional manner. “In general painting has the intention of attracting the audience into a new reality, it serves as window into a different world”, she explains.

What pushed her more towards installation was the need to intervene in the observer’s world and make them interact with it. That is how she got the idea for her final graduation work. In the main staircase of the venue where the group exhibition took place, she built a wall and obstructed their passage. While at the same time causing the visitors to circle around the whole venue in an almost violent act, she built in a part of herself, making it a personal space. She covered the wall with the wallpaper from her own bedroom, describing it as “almost like a back of a lover”. This juxtaposition of intimacy and tenderness to cold inanimate objects continues to mark her work.

As major influence in her artwork, she points out the city where she grew up – Tokyo. It’s a setting that can’t easily be forgotten – the contrast between huge complex exterior structures and tiny personal spaces make the individual feel small and powerless.  While creating, she has an image in her mind of her body in direct opposition to something immense and cold, somehow having a need to try to wrap her arms around these structures. This ultimately leads to constructing big scale installations which are at the same time sublime and scary.

So, what brought her to Germany? A visiting lecture by Tatzu Nishi in Japan inspired her to apply to Bauhaus University in Weimar, where the local art scene embraced the potential of public art and enabled her to develop her artistic expression in a new direction. One of her semester shows was held in a former prison in Weimar. She pierced the walls of prison cells and connected them with a big steel ring, once again challenging physical and societal structures. She describes the difficulties encountered in complex construction interventions, “like fighting with reality more than it being a compromise”. This allows her to expand her work even further than expected. We are excited to see what the group shows in Pilotenkueche will bring.

written by Tena Bakšaj

______________________________________________________________________________

Come and see what Atsuko creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

PK says farewell to Martin Holz

Martin Holz was and remains a PK pilot. He came to create art, but fell in love with Pilotenkueche for its potential. During his five years as Director, it developed into much more than a residency. Today Pilotenkueche is a multi-faceted program that gives more than a space in a shared studio. It recognizes a growing trend of curation by offering emerging curators three month internships. While here, they do consultations with artists, write texts and, of course, curate the shows. It also gives interns a chance to be very hands-on in the day to day happenings, including graphic design for exhibitions and writing posts for the website.

When Martin arrived as an artist, PK was located in HALLE 14 at Spinnerei and was host to around five international artists. Now it is housed in its own space in the up and coming art area of Leutsch. Each of the approximately 12 International artists has up to 36 square meters and all have inspiring views.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

The new space was just a shell when he got it, but he knew this was a place he could expand the project and make his vision come true. He worked tirelessly to have it ready for the 10th Pilotenkueche anniversary in spring of 2017. He did all the wiring, built walls, put in windows, a bathroom, a tea kitchen and an office area. He carefully designed the space so that some walls could be moved to give more flexibility when converting it from work space to exhibition space. Yes, the art was always the heart of it all.

The last five years have given Martin many wonderful memories of bonding and creating. Last November he was pleased to open Heat Lee’s show, AXIO, at the MdBK. While Heet was a resident at Pilotenkueche, the two recognized they shared the ability to see the darkness.

Martin intermingled performance and text, drawing comparisons to karate and being an artist. The fight between order and chaos requires offensive and defensive skills. In her paintings, Lee searches for the moments between chance and control. This was always a quest that Martin was happy to seek.

It was on purpose that Pilotenkueche remained an artist run program. The program supports artists in finding applicable individual funding. His goal was to create a safe space in which artists could engage and collaborate, but didn’t confine them to the program. In working together with Natalia Kalicki or Magdalena Cichon as coordinator, Martin tried to give as many opportunities to engage the local community as possible. This is why there are also two local artists each round. While they have their own studios in town, they accompany the residents on program days where a variety of high and low art activities take place and they participate in the exhibitions.

But now, unfortunately, Martin feels he has taken Pilotenkueche as far as he can. It is time to let his baby go in order for it to continue to grow. We want to publicly thank him for his countless hours of unselfish devotion and wish him all the best in his future endeavors.

Pilotenkueche will be announcing the new directors sometime in March. We look forward to seeing what that direction will bring. We welcome them and hope you will too.

Artist Spotlight: Ana Castillo

‘If I like the T-shirt I will just cut it!” – explains Ana, recklessly forgetting to add ‘out’ to the ‘cut’. Ana is our French-Spanish artist based in Paris. What is so interesting at first glance besides her working overalls, her accent and cool stance? When entering Ana’s studio, you immediately notice an obsession with image culture, particularly representation of youth, lifestyle, varieties of characters and attitudes from magazines and social media. Her sketchbook is filled with drawings of people of different backgrounds and, while drawn to representation of women in media, her characters are androgynous and masculine, singer and politicians, feminine and queer.

So, what does Ana do with these images? First, she becomes a collector. She cuts out pictures from magazines, her own photographs and from social media. She spreads them all over the table, then assembles them to create new images. As she transforms the collages, she interprets the surface and transforms their looks. Sometimes she places them in pictures of landscape, often ones that hearken back to her Spanish roots. Ana goes home to rest from the visual overload. She returns with fresh eyes to move them around again. Thus she never lets the “collection” stagnate. It is constantly altering to bring new relationships.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

The term collage was coined by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in the beginning of the 20th century when it became a distinctive part of modern art. Ana takes collage into the current century by treating it as a crucial working process. She creates a new reality which she re-interprets into painting, illustration or animated videos and GIFs. Hard-working but intuitive, playful but serious, with collage we are reminded of metaphoric pun as intellectual act. Image as product of a mind is born from not comparing two realities but rather getting them closer together.

Ana’s studio is a place where images grow and multiply. The table covered with cut out pictures juxtaposes two paintings and an orange background on the wall she has been working on simultaneously, while various photographs are opened on her laptop. Working in Pilotenkueche for Ana is not stylistically much different from working at home or in a rented studio in the City of lights. Only this time, neither she nor her painting are confined. What is new is the sense of freedom she gets in terms of spaciousness. Naturally, this reflects in her work in progress. She is aiming for larger paintings. For the upcoming exhibitions, we can expect to see paintings approaching monumental sizes. However, she will stay faithful to the appearance of a collage by avoiding the traditional, right-angled shapes of canvas.

Leipzig is, so we hear, not lacking young stylish people with attitude. During winter they hide themselves in cool bars and underground clubs, leaving the streets empty. Some of us will definitely follow Ana in her exploration of the techno scene here, enjoying the environment and in search for Leipzig characters for her new inspiration.

Written by Samra Šabanović

______________________________________________________________________________

Come and see what Ana creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: Amanda Struver

Each day Amanda sits facing her studio window, legs crossed, listening intently to her big black headphones as she researches and gathers her materials.  Her studio has two shovels, a pink sparkly pig mask, sardine tins painted white, a tripod and other objects that don’t seem connected. It is her effervescence that fills the room.  Amanda Struver considers any given space she occupies as a part of her practice. She continually thinks of ways to contextualize ideas and objects within the given situation, as she uses boundaries of place and the body, concepts of disarray and dysfunction, as tools for her work.

Amanda understands her practice as manic. She is continually working through multiple projects at once. However, each idea is linked by questions of various dualities, such as; personal vs universal; animal vs. human; nothing vs everything; dirty vs sterile.  These questions began with the exploration of her body and the ways in which one is to behave or not behave, based on the cultural/social beliefs and norms.

She does not prefer being identified in one form or to belong to any one category, but rather she frees herself by revealing different performances of alternative selves. Examples of these performances are Pool Boi– where she had the chance to care for a pool, she performed and logged entries on Instagram of her life poolside, and Scum– another performance in which she walked around the crowds of the gallery either noticed or neglected by them and created an atmosphere that tested their tolerance through smell and behaviour.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program or supplied by the artist

Order vs chaos is another duality she heavily worked through. Over the course of seven months she built up a space composed of three walls in her given studio, called a “set”, and filled it with various objects, creating different scenarios.  It evolved to her entering the space and recording her actions, which ranged from sitting on a block of lard, crushing eggs between her armpits, and pouring milk on the carpet only to absorb it back onto a rag until full and repeat. Through the repetition of a simple task or motion she lost sense of time and was transported out of the situation of the “set”.  By bringing focus to repetition, she provokes comfortability in regularity.

“It is easy to exist within a routine, and I wonder how does this influence an experience of a reality?”

While at Pilotenkueche, Amanda will be continuing to process through a few different projects, and one that is specific to the context of this residency- in which she will be digging a hole under a bridge for Sad Baby. The hole will be dug for a set number of hours, each day. In conjunction, she will be doing a series of writings for the situation of Sad Baby, who is all of us and none of us. Through this work she will suggest a notion of routine, while emulating desperation felt from doing it all for nothing.

written by mihyun maria kim

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Come and see what Amanda creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: AL Kleiner

 

“Too much decoration distracts my thought process” confirms Adam, from the seat of his nearly empty Pilotenkueche studio.  Adam’s creative process begins with research in the form of reading. For this, he needs a blank environment. This provides him the clarity of a clean mental space in which he can grow new knowledge.

It was upon discovering the Contemporary Master Heads of the 1970’s that Adam decided to face his practice with a new attitude. After experimentation at The National Art School in Sydney, he decided to hand the paint brush over to the spectator at his graduate exhibition. Now his creations could be activated by interaction from the viewer. Adam created Micro Studios: sophisticated constructions of wall hangings, encasing canvas and painting materials. The expertise Adam gathered over years of landscape paintings translated into strict attention to detail and composition within the creation of his tangible objects.

 

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Residency

A socially engaged practice satisfies Adam in knowing that he is critiquing the “look but don’t touch” ethos of the gallery space. He is hoping to push this further during his three month stay at Pilotenkueche. After a six month break from creating his own art works, he is entering the residency with no fixed program. With an interest in German politics, Adam hopes that his practice will be somewhat shaped by the dynamics of his new location and the social situations and structures in which he finds himself. I’m curious to experience how these discoveries are translated into a multi-sensory installation.

Written by Ciara Brown

Come and see what Adam creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany


Upcoming Shows of the 38th Round 2019 / 1 Jan – 31 March

Work is the main thing on the minds of the artists of the 38th round. They are busy contemplating their surroundings, researching and testing out materials. We invite you to come see the results.

Unfinished Hase

Joseph Beuys described his 1965 performance “How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare” (“Wie man dem toten Hasen die Bilder erklärt”) as an effort to expand the human potential for thought and expression beyond the rational. The group of artists of the 38th round of Pilotenkueche International Art Program played on a similar concept during one of their first meetings. The newly assembled group decided to choose an exhibition title through a sentence-building game in order to find a common ground for future collaboration. This resulted in “Unfinished Hase”. The phrase also evokes a common motif in the visual arts, the hare being a symbol for various mythological meanings in different cultures throughout art history.

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

All photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Residency

Fast Kotzen

Repulsed? It’s natural. It’s just the body’s way of protecting itself. The artists of the 38th round relate to the idea of an instantaneous reaction in a form of purging, symbolically and physically. They are eager to express themselves quickly in order to make room for new work and also to be in sync with the demands and the pace of the world today. The duality of the word “fast” (in English – quick; but in German – almost, nearly) also implies that producing new work requires a reflection beforehand, the artists currently being in a stand by mode.

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

______________________________________________________________________________

International residents

A L Kleiner 
(Painting, Installation; Sydney, Australia)

Amanda Struver 
(Interdisciplinary:Syracuse, NY, United States)

Ana Castillo 
(Illustration, Painting, Animation: Paris, France)

Atsuko Mochida 
(Installation, Site-specific Installation, Public Art : Tokyo, Japan) 

Ece Canguden
(Painting, Sculpture: Istanbul, Turkey)

Eliana Jacobs 
(Etching, Objects, Collage, Conceptual: Vancouver, BC, Canada)

Isabelle Kuzio
(Video, sculpture, painting, installation: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada)

Jose Sarmiento
(Painting, Drawing, Etching: Bucaramanga, Columbia)

Charles Park
(Photography: New York, NY, US)

Marloes Staal
(Sculpture, Photography, Drawing: Enschede, Netherlands)

Ludmila Hrachovinova 
(Painting: Bratislava, Slovakia / Stockholm, Sweden)

Roman Bicek
(Painting, Collage: Bratislava, Slovakia)

Tomas Orrego Gianella
(Video, Installation, Collage: Lima, Peru)

Valentine Emilia Bossert
(Drawing, Printmaking, Sculpture, Video, Installation: Geneva, Switzerland)


Local Participants

Henrike Pilz 
(Mixed Media; Leipzig, Germany)

Paul Altmann 
(Conceptual Art, Photography, Video, Installation: Leipzig, Germany)


Curator

Tena Bakšaj 
(Zagreb, Croatia)

Assistants

Ciara Brown
(Fine Art, Multi-media: Burnley, UK)

Samra Šabanović 
(Photography, Visual Culture: Helsinki, Finland / Sarajevo, B&H)

Maria Valcarcel Maceira 
(Art History: A Estrada, Spain)

Mihyun Maria Kim 
(Painting, Drawing; Toronto, Canada)

PK Artistic Director and Coordinator

maeshelle west-davies
(Performance, Time-based media, Installation: US/UK/DE