Artist spotlight: Amanda Struver

Each day Amanda sits facing her studio window, legs crossed, listening intently to her big black headphones as she researches and gathers her materials.  Her studio has two shovels, a pink sparkly pig mask, sardine tins painted white, a tripod and other objects that don’t seem connected. It is her effervescence that fills the room.  Amanda Struver considers any given space she occupies as a part of her practice. She continually thinks of ways to contextualize ideas and objects within the given situation, as she uses boundaries of place and the body, concepts of disarray and dysfunction, as tools for her work.

Amanda understands her practice as manic. She is continually working through multiple projects at once. However, each idea is linked by questions of various dualities, such as; personal vs universal; animal vs. human; nothing vs everything; dirty vs sterile.  These questions began with the exploration of her body and the ways in which one is to behave or not behave, based on the cultural/social beliefs and norms.

She does not prefer being identified in one form or to belong to any one category, but rather she frees herself by revealing different performances of alternative selves. Examples of these performances are Pool Boi– where she had the chance to care for a pool, she performed and logged entries on Instagram of her life poolside, and Scum– another performance in which she walked around the crowds of the gallery either noticed or neglected by them and created an atmosphere that tested their tolerance through smell and behaviour.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program or supplied by the artist

Order vs chaos is another duality she heavily worked through. Over the course of seven months she built up a space composed of three walls in her given studio, called a “set”, and filled it with various objects, creating different scenarios.  It evolved to her entering the space and recording her actions, which ranged from sitting on a block of lard, crushing eggs between her armpits, and pouring milk on the carpet only to absorb it back onto a rag until full and repeat. Through the repetition of a simple task or motion she lost sense of time and was transported out of the situation of the “set”.  By bringing focus to repetition, she provokes comfortability in regularity.

“It is easy to exist within a routine, and I wonder how does this influence an experience of a reality?”

While at Pilotenkueche, Amanda will be continuing to process through a few different projects, and one that is specific to the context of this residency- in which she will be digging a hole under a bridge for Sad Baby. The hole will be dug for a set number of hours, each day. In conjunction, she will be doing a series of writings for the situation of Sad Baby, who is all of us and none of us. Through this work she will suggest a notion of routine, while emulating desperation felt from doing it all for nothing.

written by mihyun maria kim

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Come and see what Amanda creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: AL Kleiner

 

“Too much decoration distracts my thought process” confirms Adam, from the seat of his nearly empty Pilotenkueche studio.  Adam’s creative process begins with research in the form of reading. For this, he needs a blank environment. This provides him the clarity of a clean mental space in which he can grow new knowledge.

It was upon discovering the Contemporary Master Heads of the 1970’s that Adam decided to face his practice with a new attitude. After experimentation at The National Art School in Sydney, he decided to hand the paint brush over to the spectator at his graduate exhibition. Now his creations could be activated by interaction from the viewer. Adam created Micro Studios: sophisticated constructions of wall hangings, encasing canvas and painting materials. The expertise Adam gathered over years of landscape paintings translated into strict attention to detail and composition within the creation of his tangible objects.

A socially engaged practice satisfies Adam in knowing that he is critiquing the “look but don’t touch” ethos of the gallery space. He is hoping to push this further during his three month stay at Pilotenkueche. After a six month break from creating his own art works, he is entering the residency with no fixed program. With an interest in German politics, Adam hopes that his practice will be somewhat shaped by the dynamics of his new location and the social situations and structures in which he finds himself. I’m curious to experience how these discoveries are translated into a multi-sensory installation.

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Residency

Written by Ciara Brown

Come and see what Adam creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany


Upcoming Shows of the 38th Round 2019 / 1 Jan – 31 March

Work is the main thing on the minds of the artists of the 38th round. They are busy contemplating their surroundings, researching and testing out materials. We invite you to come see the results.

Unfinished Hase

Joseph Beuys described his 1965 performance “How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare” (“Wie man dem toten Hasen die Bilder erklärt”) as an effort to expand the human potential for thought and expression beyond the rational. The group of artists of the 38th round of Pilotenkueche International Art Program played on a similar concept during one of their first meetings. The newly assembled group decided to choose an exhibition title through a sentence-building game in order to find a common ground for future collaboration. This resulted in “Unfinished Hase”. The phrase also evokes a common motif in the visual arts, the hare being a symbol for various mythological meanings in different cultures throughout art history.

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

All photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Residency

Fast Kotzen

Repulsed? It’s natural. It’s just the body’s way of protecting itself. The artists of the 38th round relate to the idea of an instantaneous reaction in a form of purging, symbolically and physically. They are eager to express themselves quickly in order to make room for new work and also to be in sync with the demands and the pace of the world today. The duality of the word “fast” (in English – quick; but in German – almost, nearly) also implies that producing new work requires a reflection beforehand, the artists currently being in a stand by mode.

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

______________________________________________________________________________

International residents

A L Kleiner 
(Painting, Installation; Sydney, Australia)

Amanda Struver 
(Interdisciplinary:Syracuse, NY, United States)

Ana Castillo 
(Illustration, Painting, Animation: Paris, France)

Atsuko Mochida 
(Installation, Site-specific Installation, Public Art : Tokyo, Japan) 

Ece Canguden
(Painting, Sculpture: Istanbul, Turkey)

Eliana Jacobs 
(Etching, Objects, Collage, Conceptual: Vancouver, BC, Canada)

Isabelle Kuzio
(Video, sculpture, painting, installation: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada)

Jose Sarmiento
(Painting, Drawing, Etching: Bucaramanga, Columbia)

Charles Park
(Photography: New York, NY, US)

Marloes Staal
(Sculpture, Photography, Drawing: Enschede, Netherlands)

Ludmila Hrachovinova 
(Painting: Bratislava, Slovakia)

Roman Bicek
(Painting, Collage: Bratislava, Slovakia)

Tomas Orrego Gianella
(Video, Installation, Collage: Lima, Peru)

Valentine Emilia Bossert
(Drawing, Printmaking, Sculpture, Video, Installation: Geneva, Switzerland)


Local Participants

Henike Pilz 
(Mixed Media; Leipzig, Germany)

Paul Altmann 
(Conceptual Art, Photography, Video, Installation: Leipzig, Germany)


Curator

Tena Bakšaj 
(Zabreb, Croatia)

Assistants

Ciara Brown
(Fine Art, Multi-media: Burnley, UK)

Maria Valcarcel Maceira 
(Art History: A Estrada, Spain)

Samra Šabanović 
(Photography, Visual Culture: Helsinki, Finland / Sarajevo, B&H)

Mihyun Maria Kim 
(Painting, Drawing; Edmonton, Canada)

PK Artistic Director and Coordinator

maeshelle west-davies
(Performance, Time-based media, Installation: US/UK/DE

Meet the curator: Tena Bakšaj

In 2017, Tena went to a small punk bar in Connewitz. She had seen a flyer for an exhibition entitled, Enjoy Yourself.  Music, dance, drink and art sounded like the perfect way to do that. It was an exhibition from the 33rd round of Pilotenkueche. After conversing with the artists, Tena was enticed to follow their journey. When she attended their final show, she felt comfortable in the Pilotenkueche space and decided to apply for the curator internship.

After studying French and German Language and Literature in Zagreb, Tena started working at the Modern Gallery. There she learned how to take visitors on guided tours, building a storytelling skill which later found its way into her work.

Discussion with a group of former museum colleagues lead to a common realisation that there was a lack of opportunities for emerging artists and young curators within the city. This resulted in the birth of Kolektiv EMGE – a non-profit curatorial organization dedicated to filling this gap. This allowed Tena to develop a practical knowledge in the field of curation and the organization of art events.

Kolektiv EMGE ‘s first exhibition, Under Cover

“We noticed that there was a refined independent music scene present in the whole region and that a lot of musicians collaborate with local artists in a form of cover artwork or visual identity, thus creating an alternative/DIY network between many local young creatives. We wanted to research and map these collaborations in a form of an exhibition.”

A series of interviews with musicians and artists lead to an exhibition showcasing 50 cover artworks along with a story and explanation of how each image was derived. The success of the exhibition lead to a tour of the ex-Yugoslavian region, fulfilling the collective’s original goals and providing them the energy to push their intentions further.

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Residency or supplied by Tena

With their next curatorial project, the collective decided to take a similar anthropological research approach – this time with the topic of Kino (movie theatres) in Zagreb from the sixties and seventies. After delving into state archives and newspapers, EMGE gathered material to create a multimedia interactive exhibition. They showed the current and past states of each theatre. The focus was on the development, growth and degradation of each individual site and eventually on how the buildings were adequately or inadequately repurposed.

Next, Tena and the collective assisted in the coordination of the Antisalon project, which is based on the concept of gathering the work of artists recently rejected by the Youth Salon (an established biennial art show collating works of emerging Croatian artists). Antisalon is a space where young artists often exhibit for their first time and it takes place in Zagreb’s alternative center/squat Medika, in Grey gallery. The main goal is to give insight into the complete emerging art scene and not only the works selected by established museum. This was Tena’s first step towards curating a show with an emphasis on providing a platform for each individual artist.

As the next development, Pilotenkueche will allow Tena to gain experience in building relationships with each artist and monitoring the progress of all projects involved in the exhibition.

“I’m looking forward to the challenge of working with sixteen very unique artists and providing ample attention to each one of them. My desire is to create a coherent show which is accessible to the public eye. It is important to me that there is a dialogue between the works. This close relationship and observation of the artists progression should enable me to find this dialogue.”

Welcome round 38

We are extremely excited to introduce round 38. With very talented artists from all over the world, this round is ready to inspire you to ask questions. Of course one question that continues to be asked is, “What is art?” This varied group will challenge your perceptions through painting, drawing, sculpture, collage, installation, photography, video, interactive works and performance. The next three months are going to be enlightening.

Photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program


International residents

A L Kleiner 
(Painting, Installation; Sydney, Australia)

Amanda Struver 
(Interdisciplinary:Syracuse, NY, United States)

Ana Castillo 
(Illustration, Painting, Animation: Paris, France)

Atsuko Mochida
(Installation, Site-specific Installation, Public Art : Tokyo, Japan) 

Ece Canguden
(Painting, Sculpture: Istanbul, Turkey)

Eliana Jacobs
(Etching, Objects, Collage, Conceptual: Vancouver, BC, Canada)

Isabelle Kuzio
(Video, sculpture, painting, installation: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada)

Jose Sarmiento
(Painting, Drawing, Etching: Bucaramanga, Columbia)

Charles Park
(Photography: New York, NY, US)

Marloes Staal
(Sculpture, Photography, Drawing: Enschede, Netherlands)

Ludmila Hrachovinova 
(Painting: Bratislava, Slovakia)

Roman Bicek
(Painting, Collage: Bratislava, Slovakia)

Tomas Orrego Gianella
(Video, Installation, Collage: Lima, Peru)

Valentine Emilia Bossert
(Drawing, Printmaking, Sculpture, Video, Installation: Geneva, Switzerland)


Local Participants

Henike Pilz 
(Mixed Media; Leipzig, Germany)

Paul Altmann 
(Conceptual Art, Photography, Video, Installation: Leipzig, Germany)


Curator

Tena Bakšaj
(Zabreb, Croatia)

Assistants

Ciara Brown
(Fine Art, Multi-media: Birnley, UK)

Samra Šabanović
(Photography, Visual Culture:Helsinki, Finland / Sarajevo, B&H)

Maria Valcarcel Maceira
(Art History: A Estrada, Spain)

Mihyun Maria Kim
(Painting, Drawing; Edmonton, Canada)

PK Artistic Director and Coordinator

maeshelle west-davies
(Performance, Time-based media, Installation: US/UK/DE


This was the 37th round

Last week we said goodbye to 2018 and, with it, our most recent residents. We will remember the ideas and collaborative spontaneity that filled the studio, but most of all their ability to play in life and through their art. We were able to bond through our collective experiences. Between our four exhibitions, our program days included day trips to Bauhaus and Halle. We saw Leipzig from many perspectives, talked to exhibiting artists, gallery owners, curators and project spaces. We toured the west with architects, went to museums and even to the Christmas market.

We danced, we laughed, but most of all: we created.

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

ReView: SPOOR

SPOOR /spʊə,spɔː/

noun
1. the track or scent of an animal.
verb
1. follow the track or scent of (an animal or person).

The aim of the final exhibition resulting from 37th round of the Pilotenkueche International Art Program is to raise the issue of being-in-the-world, bringing forth the notion of perception. It is “the background from which all acts stand out, and is presupposed by them”. We do not perceive isolated sense-impressions because we only see things as they relate. Our mental representations are formed by our previous experiences and future expectations. Art can capture the affective primordial contact that tends to go unnoticed. Artists are embedded and immersed in the tangible day to day world and assume a life of their own, opening themselves to metaphoric meanings by responding with forms, shapes, and colours.

Contemporary artistic process is not only about understanding technical formalities and introducing them in the art practice, but about the production of strangeness. Thus, contemporary art does not refer to a single determining judgment. In principle, the artistic process is not governed by rules and pre-established categories: these are what the artist seeks to discover and establish in their work. Contemporary art embraces sensibility – the artworks aim to capture the displacement of subjectivity through experiments and propositions that operate as a circuit breaker of the perception. It is a deflection of what is known.

all images by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

This plurality is present during the selection of artists for the program. The choices are based on the quality of their works, not in an a priori theme for each round. This means the relationships outlined between their poetics are subsequent and follow the uniqueness of the pieces produced during the residency. After three months, it is clear that all artists have sought to trace relationships with the city: its characteristics and found artefacts, each of them making their own way. 

text by curator Viviane Tabach


For the vernissage of SPOOR, Pilotenkueche was happy to host three musical performances. Violinist Izabela Kaldunska, originally from Poland,  played excerpts from her experimental work “The New Solarism”, along with some freshly created compositions. Classically trained as a pianist Elif Murat, originally from Ankara, Turkey, also presented some of her new electronic chill out pieces ‘Ellie M.’. Then the pair joined to perform as Ichor, a  collaborative project in which they compose electronic dance music. Just like the artists on the residency, Izabela and Elif  met in Leipzig.


SPOOR
14-19 Dec 2018

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty

In progress: SPOOR

It’s hard to believe, but we are currently getting ready for the final exhibition of the 37th round, SPOOR. The Dutch word “spoor” can be translated as track, trace, railway, trail, spur, mark, shadow, footprint, imprint, etc. 14 artists were chosen by open call to come to Pilotenkueche. They were chosen, not as a group, but on their individual works. 

Pilotenkueche became the hub that was their intersection. Many used the time here to experiment and try new things. Often these experiments were a result of what other artists were doing around them. They were also in reaction to their common environment: Leipzig.

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

How have the artists translated their perceptions of their experience here into pieces that the public can see? Will it be clearly visible to the viewer? Will you be amused, enraged, empowered, curious, saddened, pleased, transported? We hope you will be moved.

We are proud to announce that your experiencing of the artworks will be enhanced at the vernissage by musicians Izabela Kałduńska (violin) and  Elif Murat (piano) who will be playing original compositions singularly and electronic dance music as a duo.


SPOOR

Vernissage 
Fri 14 Dec 2018 7PM
Performance by Izabela Kałduńska begins 7.30PM
Performance by Elif Murat begins 8.15PM
Performance by duo begins 9PM

Open
Sat 15 Dec – Wed 19 Dec 5PM – 8PM

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Artist Spotlight: Yuuki Horiuchi

Yuuki Horiuchi was born in 1990 in Nara, Japan, and lives and works in Tokyo. During her childhood and teenage years, the artist enjoyed reading comic books and watching movies, and still does up to this day. In Japan, comic books are addressed to all age groups and come in many different formats, such as literature, in the shape of novels, as pornography. They can be sources of entertainment  or an expressive way of narrating historical facts. Also, the comics and animations whose target are teenage females – named ‘Shōjo manga’, after the meaning of ‘young girl’ in Japanese – are deeply related to feminism. The stories and characters in these books are usually influenced by Japan’s social and cultural background, and Yuuki understands them as a result of a big whirlpool of destiny.

The artist sees the moment of becoming conscious about death as turning point in her life. She is familiar with both western and eastern philosophers, recently identifying with Baruch Spinoza’s Sub specie aeternitatis – «an honorific expression describing what is universally and eternally true, without any reference to or dependence upon the temporal portions of reality». Also interested in matters such as time, past and future, the universe’s progression, shamanism and faith, the artist reflects on the circle of life, destiny, coincidence and inevitability. She is aware that human life and the present are fundamentally dependent on external factors, just like the characters in the comic books she reads.

“There was the past, and with it all the past events that happened regardless of my potential choices;  there’s the present, with happenings that are the result of chances and choices of my own;  and there’s the future, which remains an open book of uncertainty regarding what may or may not happen. And for me, this is a reminder that I am a fragment of this world and that most of the things are uncontrolled”, she describes.

For Yuuki Horiuchi, this is the starting point of her understanding of human life and, consequentially, of her production, which is intrinsically visible in most of her past works. More recently, the artist began pondering the relationship between these different life occurrences, their resulting emotional consequences and the way they are visually depicted in most comic books, often recurring to mnemonics.

all photos by Pilotenkueche Art Program

Yuuki Horiuchi became fascinated with how incredibly well portrayed the characters’ expressions are – weather expressing happiness, surprise, sadness or anger – and how easily one can comprehend the characters’ emotions before one starts reading the actual story. For the artist, it is possible to illustrate meaning through simple graphics. She is currently exploring the importance of shapes and graphic forms as a direct influence in their narratives, from the pages’ composition to the speech bubbles included in it. The artist investigates the recurring patterns and symbolisms present in comic books and attempts to bring them into her fine art practice.

Instead of reproducing the standard appearance of a comic book – filled with stories, figurative images and flat colours – the artist reproduces solely the layout of the page using both organic and geometric shapes in shades of gray and blue pastels. These resemble translucent spaces entirely devoid of matter, and the speech bubbles particularly allude to the cosmos. The investigation is done through oil painting, although the artist dares to paint as one would with watercolour. This resemblance of the watercolour technique is even more evident in the artist’s paintings on paper, in which the marks dissolve fluently and unpredictably throughout the surface. When working in monochrome, this dissolution can also resemble etching. Yuuki Horiuchi is interested in discovering the different ways of how the audience receives these graphic elements in painting, as more layers are added through the use of brush strokes and fluid mediums.

Yuuki Horiuchi holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from the Fine Arts in Tokyo University of the Arts, in Japan, and has also completed an exchange programme at Glasgow School of Art, in United Kingdom. The artist has taken part in many artistic residencies, such as The Central Saint Martins’ Associate Studio Programmes (Y-AIR Exchange), in London and Youkobo Art Space (Y-AIR Exchange), in Tokyo, both in 2018. She was awarded a place at the Art Project Ideas 2017 exhibition, in Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan, and Video Field was her last solo exhibition, at Youkobo Art Space, in Tokyo.

text by Viviane Tabach and Ines Alberty

You can see Yuuki Horiuchi’s work in the four upcoming shows of round 37.

SPEECH BUBBLE

Finissage: 30.11.18 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

SPOOR

Vernissage:  14.12.18, 19h
Open:  15 – 20.12.18 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

AHS speech bubble PK

Re-View: Rutschbahn and Speech Bubble

Marking the half way point of the artists’ time at Pilotenkueche art residency, Rutschbahn, the second exhibition of Pilotenkueche round 37, opened on Friday, the 16th of November 2018 at Krudebude.  Krudebude is an unusual exhibition space set in a “Wächterhaus” – a very Leipzig concept which provides apartments and other project spaces for inexpensive rent –. This made for a intimate and friendly atmosphere throughout the evening .

The 10 participating artists were encouraged to collaborate and make use of the space and its peculiar characteristics. This was particularly visible with Buket Savci’s work Hole of Mystical Desire, which was placed in direct relation with the remains of flowered wallpaper on one of the doors;  Jan Yongdeok Lim’s installation Smoke, which appropriated the coal burning stove in one of the rooms, and Reinhold Ponesch’s RIDE MY HORNS, placed just above one of the door frames in the entrance hall in reference to the traditional placement of mounted horns.

A great number of guests arrived as soon as the clock hit 7pm, and just an hour later, everyone gathered in one of the rooms to watch Reinhold Ponesch and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s collaborative performance IT CONCERNS YOU. This was Reinhold Ponesch’s and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s first experience with performance art. It was engaging to see how fiercely emotions were portrayed by the two artists. The audience was also positively taken by surprise when encouraged to participate.

We welcomed some familiar faces, previously spotted at the artists’ first exhibitionI Accept the Cookies – who were enthusiastic to see the development of the artists’ practice from  its first work-in-progress sneak peak. New faces kept on arriving until late in the evening, and the same was visible at the finissage last Thursday, 22 November 2018. Ann-Kathrin – one of the organizers of Krudebude – was positively amazed by the show, claiming it was one of the best so far at the space, both in quality and attendance.

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

Just a week later, on Friday, 23 November 2018, the third exhibition of the 37th round of Pilotenkueche – Speech Bubble – opened its doors. This was the first exhibition showcasing all 14 artists, marking local artist Georg Lisek’s first exhibition of the round with the display of Mask Variation, one of the two video works that could be seen in the show.

The evening began with a welcome speech by Barbara Röhner, owner of Alte Handelsschule and organizer of its exhibition space, followed by words from curator Viviane Tabach. For the curator, this show marks a turning point in the artists’ creative journey at the residency, where they can naturally invent their spaces within the large floor areas of the space, as well as its high ceilings. The artists finally have the freedom to exhibit some of the larger works that have been behind the studio walls, anxiously awaiting their moment. There was also space to develop site-specific work, as Luca Arboccò so rightly did. 

Before reaching the second floor where the exhibition takes place, visitors were surprised by flashing colours on their right as they walked up the stairs. As they followed this intriguing set of blue and purple lights, they found the first piece from the exhibition, No Broken Mirrors Shift Between Our Glance, by Nicholas Adamson. At first just a broken chair carefully laid on the floor, once the visitors moved closer and engaged in the space, they could see a mirror below the chair, reflecting an oil painting of a clown.

 

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

As the visitors continued up the stairs, they were intoxicated by the sound of Izabela Kałduńska’s music performance “The New Solarism” as they entered the exhibition space. Sitting in harmony amid Finn Curry and David Benarroch’s sculptures, the audience was treated to an hour long experimental performance that shifted between loops of classical violin arrangements and other sounds such as tearing paper, taps on wood and voice. 

Some visitors were noticed exploring the processes of Jan Yongdeok Lim’s Draainweg series through touch, which was interestingly unusual; others were intrigued by Barry Amey’s pieces and their reflection of colour on the wall, and curiously placed their hands behind the pieces to sense their heat – or as they then discovered, the lack of it – in an attempt to explore if they conveyed any light. For many guests, the most striking pieces were Julia Eichler’s Borderwallprototype I and II, for their materiality and playfulness; discovering they are relatively light, considering appearing heavy.

As the evening progressed, the guests grew comfortable – some sat in each corner of the room discussing the different works on view, and others laid on the floor next to Ai Ikeda’s piece Reassembling Matters, almost blending in with the ropes, kraft and waste papers.

These were two nights to remember and we cannot wait to meet again at the most awaited of all exhibitions –  the final one.

SPOOR
Friday, 14 December 2018
at the PK studio space.


Last chance to see Speech Bubble:
finissage Friday 30 Dec from 7PM.


Rutschbahn

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)

Local Artist:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Speech Bubble

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)

Curator:
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants:
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)