Category Archives: artists

Artist spotlight: Ece Canguden

Plastic objects seduce Ece on her every day walk. When one proves to be desirable, she takes it back to her studio. There, she transforms it into organic forms, building multiple layers by adding and distorting, playing with fire and water, pushing and pulling with her hands.  

Ece studied to become an architect. Years of working in an office under strict guidelines and balancing symmetric square forms created the need to have an outlet where she could have complete control. She began to work more intuitively, playing with materials, creating organic shapes and natural colours. She started to paint abstract spaces resembling cosmic explosions and dark holes.

The dark uncomfortable matter peaked her interests- the insides being exposed into the outer layers, showing a depth, the hidden, the deep mystery, like a secret slowly being revealed:  something curious that uncomfortably exists, seeming not to belong. The state of the people back home in Turkey, she explains, is that one cannot easily show emotions or reactions to current political events.  This bottling up, holding in fear and anger has created a visible uncomfortable state.

 all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

“Weird!” is what we call something that seems wrong or should not exist, not here anyway.  Mark Fisher’s book, The Weird and The Eerie, influences Ece’s perspective on the state of her nation and of individuals, but she knows how to balance it out, between the serious and playful. She knows when to allow thoughts in and when to keep them out. She has a fascination for the body, especially the mouth- where things enter and are then digested- and the eyes that take in all that is in front of them and which also signifies being watched.

In her studio, in Leipzig, she has gathered more toys than usual. The colours of the objects have transitioned from black to red and now to pink, resembling flesh and all its connotations.  She plays with the colour and layers a certain level of sexuality through the use of feminine forms without being obvious. The use of something playful and something dangerous, working through control and with chance, perhaps comes from her Gemini spirit.

Chance and Coincidence take on key roles in her process, and throughout the next couple of months, Ece will continue to test the limits. How far is too far for her materials? At what point does her manipulation rob them of their essence? Do the objects of the city gain from being part of the greater cosmos Ece is creating? How will she be influenced by her peers in an open studio environment and the personal exploration of all that she discovers?

written by mihyun maria kim

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Come and see what Ece creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: Atsuko Mochida


People are invited to a small room. They are asked to expand the space by pushing the wall. Unbeknownst to them, behind the wall there is a bedroom. The moving wall displaces each piece of furniture and collapses the private space. As people push the wall, they can hear that something moves, falls and smashes. After shattered glasses and spilled water are cluttered on the floor, they can go behind the wall and understand what has taken place.

“Push the Wall” by Japanese artist Atsuko Mochida reveals her current artistic practice. Visitors are often encouraged to participate in space changing installations that question the notion of public and private, provoking a wide range of reactions.

For her 2017 project, called The revolving house of T., she cut out a portion of her grandmother’s house in Mito, Japan to create a revolving central area. Visitors can rotate the structure by pushing the walls. By the constant exchange of interior and exterior or public and private, she wanted to activate the house and change the energy, transforming a structure into a human body, while at the same time questioning the structure of one family.

All photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Before finding her own place between architecture and art, Atsuko studied Japanese traditional painting at Musashino Art University in Tokyo. Most of her colleagues were painting in a traditional manner. “In general painting has the intention of attracting the audience into a new reality, it serves as window into a different world”, she explains.

What pushed her more towards installation was the need to intervene in the observer’s world and make them interact with it. That is how she got the idea for her final graduation work. In the main staircase of the venue where the group exhibition took place, she built a wall and obstructed their passage. While at the same time causing the visitors to circle around the whole venue in an almost violent act, she built in a part of herself, making it a personal space. She covered the wall with the wallpaper from her own bedroom, describing it as “almost like a back of a lover”. This juxtaposition of intimacy and tenderness to cold inanimate objects continues to mark her work.

As major influence in her artwork, she points out the city where she grew up – Tokyo. It’s a setting that can’t easily be forgotten – the contrast between huge complex exterior structures and tiny personal spaces make the individual feel small and powerless.  While creating, she has an image in her mind of her body in direct opposition to something immense and cold, somehow having a need to try to wrap her arms around these structures. This ultimately leads to constructing big scale installations which are at the same time sublime and scary.

So, what brought her to Germany? A visiting lecture by Tatzu Nishi in Japan inspired her to apply to Bauhaus University in Weimar, where the local art scene embraced the potential of public art and enabled her to develop her artistic expression in a new direction. One of her semester shows was held in a former prison in Weimar. She pierced the walls of prison cells and connected them with a big steel ring, once again challenging physical and societal structures. She describes the difficulties encountered in complex construction interventions, “like fighting with reality more than it being a compromise”. This allows her to expand her work even further than expected. We are excited to see what the group shows in Pilotenkueche will bring.

written by Tena Bakšaj

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Come and see what Atsuko creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist Spotlight: Ana Castillo

‘If I like the T-shirt I will just cut it!” – explains Ana, recklessly forgetting to add ‘out’ to the ‘cut’. Ana is our French-Spanish artist based in Paris. What is so interesting at first glance besides her working overalls, her accent and cool stance? When entering Ana’s studio, you immediately notice an obsession with image culture, particularly representation of youth, lifestyle, varieties of characters and attitudes from magazines and social media. Her sketchbook is filled with drawings of people of different backgrounds and, while drawn to representation of women in media, her characters are androgynous and masculine, singer and politicians, feminine and queer.

So, what does Ana do with these images? First, she becomes a collector. She cuts out pictures from magazines, her own photographs and from social media. She spreads them all over the table, then assembles them to create new images. As she transforms the collages, she interprets the surface and transforms their looks. Sometimes she places them in pictures of landscape, often ones that hearken back to her Spanish roots. Ana goes home to rest from the visual overload. She returns with fresh eyes to move them around again. Thus she never lets the “collection” stagnate. It is constantly altering to bring new relationships.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

The term collage was coined by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in the beginning of the 20th century when it became a distinctive part of modern art. Ana takes collage into the current century by treating it as a crucial working process. She creates a new reality which she re-interprets into painting, illustration or animated videos and GIFs. Hard-working but intuitive, playful but serious, with collage we are reminded of metaphoric pun as intellectual act. Image as product of a mind is born from not comparing two realities but rather getting them closer together.

Ana’s studio is a place where images grow and multiply. The table covered with cut out pictures juxtaposes two paintings and an orange background on the wall she has been working on simultaneously, while various photographs are opened on her laptop. Working in Pilotenkueche for Ana is not stylistically much different from working at home or in a rented studio in the City of lights. Only this time, neither she nor her painting are confined. What is new is the sense of freedom she gets in terms of spaciousness. Naturally, this reflects in her work in progress. She is aiming for larger paintings. For the upcoming exhibitions, we can expect to see paintings approaching monumental sizes. However, she will stay faithful to the appearance of a collage by avoiding the traditional, right-angled shapes of canvas.

Leipzig is, so we hear, not lacking young stylish people with attitude. During winter they hide themselves in cool bars and underground clubs, leaving the streets empty. Some of us will definitely follow Ana in her exploration of the techno scene here, enjoying the environment and in search for Leipzig characters for her new inspiration.

Written by Samra Šabanović

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Come and see what Ana creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: Amanda Struver

Each day Amanda sits facing her studio window, legs crossed, listening intently to her big black headphones as she researches and gathers her materials.  Her studio has two shovels, a pink sparkly pig mask, sardine tins painted white, a tripod and other objects that don’t seem connected. It is her effervescence that fills the room.  Amanda Struver considers any given space she occupies as a part of her practice. She continually thinks of ways to contextualize ideas and objects within the given situation, as she uses boundaries of place and the body, concepts of disarray and dysfunction, as tools for her work.

Amanda understands her practice as manic. She is continually working through multiple projects at once. However, each idea is linked by questions of various dualities, such as; personal vs universal; animal vs. human; nothing vs everything; dirty vs sterile.  These questions began with the exploration of her body and the ways in which one is to behave or not behave, based on the cultural/social beliefs and norms.

She does not prefer being identified in one form or to belong to any one category, but rather she frees herself by revealing different performances of alternative selves. Examples of these performances are Pool Boi– where she had the chance to care for a pool, she performed and logged entries on Instagram of her life poolside, and Scum– another performance in which she walked around the crowds of the gallery either noticed or neglected by them and created an atmosphere that tested their tolerance through smell and behaviour.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program or supplied by the artist

Order vs chaos is another duality she heavily worked through. Over the course of seven months she built up a space composed of three walls in her given studio, called a “set”, and filled it with various objects, creating different scenarios.  It evolved to her entering the space and recording her actions, which ranged from sitting on a block of lard, crushing eggs between her armpits, and pouring milk on the carpet only to absorb it back onto a rag until full and repeat. Through the repetition of a simple task or motion she lost sense of time and was transported out of the situation of the “set”.  By bringing focus to repetition, she provokes comfortability in regularity.

“It is easy to exist within a routine, and I wonder how does this influence an experience of a reality?”

While at Pilotenkueche, Amanda will be continuing to process through a few different projects, and one that is specific to the context of this residency- in which she will be digging a hole under a bridge for Sad Baby. The hole will be dug for a set number of hours, each day. In conjunction, she will be doing a series of writings for the situation of Sad Baby, who is all of us and none of us. Through this work she will suggest a notion of routine, while emulating desperation felt from doing it all for nothing.

written by mihyun maria kim

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Come and see what Amanda creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: AL Kleiner

 

“Too much decoration distracts my thought process” confirms Adam, from the seat of his nearly empty Pilotenkueche studio.  Adam’s creative process begins with research in the form of reading. For this, he needs a blank environment. This provides him the clarity of a clean mental space in which he can grow new knowledge.

It was upon discovering the Contemporary Master Heads of the 1970’s that Adam decided to face his practice with a new attitude. After experimentation at The National Art School in Sydney, he decided to hand the paint brush over to the spectator at his graduate exhibition. Now his creations could be activated by interaction from the viewer. Adam created Micro Studios: sophisticated constructions of wall hangings, encasing canvas and painting materials. The expertise Adam gathered over years of landscape paintings translated into strict attention to detail and composition within the creation of his tangible objects.

 

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Residency

A socially engaged practice satisfies Adam in knowing that he is critiquing the “look but don’t touch” ethos of the gallery space. He is hoping to push this further during his three month stay at Pilotenkueche. After a six month break from creating his own art works, he is entering the residency with no fixed program. With an interest in German politics, Adam hopes that his practice will be somewhat shaped by the dynamics of his new location and the social situations and structures in which he finds himself. I’m curious to experience how these discoveries are translated into a multi-sensory installation.

Written by Ciara Brown

Come and see what Adam creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Adam Kleiner has been inquiring about the current political and environmental climate of Germany due to the rapid rise of their populist party, the AfD and their desire to strip Germany’s renewable energy plan outlined in their manifesto. The work “Nimm eine pflantze – du wirst sie brauchen” (take a plant – you’ll need it”) focuses on distributing plants in exchange for a donation to extinction rebellion, an international social movement aims to reduce the current impact of climate change via non-violent protest and civil disobedience. Each plant in the work was selected for their noted air purifying qualities which further engages with the history of Leipzig being an industrial city as well as Saxony being the highest supporters of the AfD.

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany


This was the 37th round

Last week we said goodbye to 2018 and, with it, our most recent residents. We will remember the ideas and collaborative spontaneity that filled the studio, but most of all their ability to play in life and through their art. We were able to bond through our collective experiences. Between our four exhibitions, our program days included day trips to Bauhaus and Halle. We saw Leipzig from many perspectives, talked to exhibiting artists, gallery owners, curators and project spaces. We toured the west with architects, went to museums and even to the Christmas market.

We danced, we laughed, but most of all: we created.

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

ReView: SPOOR

SPOOR /spʊə,spɔː/

noun
1. the track or scent of an animal.
verb
1. follow the track or scent of (an animal or person).

The aim of the final exhibition resulting from 37th round of the Pilotenkueche International Art Program is to raise the issue of being-in-the-world, bringing forth the notion of perception. It is “the background from which all acts stand out, and is presupposed by them”. We do not perceive isolated sense-impressions because we only see things as they relate. Our mental representations are formed by our previous experiences and future expectations. Art can capture the affective primordial contact that tends to go unnoticed. Artists are embedded and immersed in the tangible day to day world and assume a life of their own, opening themselves to metaphoric meanings by responding with forms, shapes, and colours.

Contemporary artistic process is not only about understanding technical formalities and introducing them in the art practice, but about the production of strangeness. Thus, contemporary art does not refer to a single determining judgment. In principle, the artistic process is not governed by rules and pre-established categories: these are what the artist seeks to discover and establish in their work. Contemporary art embraces sensibility – the artworks aim to capture the displacement of subjectivity through experiments and propositions that operate as a circuit breaker of the perception. It is a deflection of what is known.

all images by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

This plurality is present during the selection of artists for the program. The choices are based on the quality of their works, not in an a priori theme for each round. This means the relationships outlined between their poetics are subsequent and follow the uniqueness of the pieces produced during the residency. After three months, it is clear that all artists have sought to trace relationships with the city: its characteristics and found artefacts, each of them making their own way. 

text by curator Viviane Tabach


For the vernissage of SPOOR, Pilotenkueche was happy to host three musical performances. Violinist Izabela Kaldunska, originally from Poland,  played excerpts from her experimental work “The New Solarism”, along with some freshly created compositions. Classically trained as a pianist Elif Murat, originally from Ankara, Turkey, also presented some of her new electronic chill out pieces ‘Ellie M.’. Then the pair joined to perform as Ichor, a  collaborative project in which they compose electronic dance music. Just like the artists on the residency, Izabela and Elif  met in Leipzig.


SPOOR
14-19 Dec 2018

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty

Artist Spotlight: Yuuki Horiuchi

Yuuki Horiuchi was born in 1990 in Nara, Japan, and lives and works in Tokyo. During her childhood and teenage years, the artist enjoyed reading comic books and watching movies, and still does up to this day. In Japan, comic books are addressed to all age groups and come in many different formats, such as literature, in the shape of novels, as pornography. They can be sources of entertainment  or an expressive way of narrating historical facts. Also, the comics and animations whose target are teenage females – named ‘Shōjo manga’, after the meaning of ‘young girl’ in Japanese – are deeply related to feminism. The stories and characters in these books are usually influenced by Japan’s social and cultural background, and Yuuki understands them as a result of a big whirlpool of destiny.

The artist sees the moment of becoming conscious about death as turning point in her life. She is familiar with both western and eastern philosophers, recently identifying with Baruch Spinoza’s Sub specie aeternitatis – «an honorific expression describing what is universally and eternally true, without any reference to or dependence upon the temporal portions of reality». Also interested in matters such as time, past and future, the universe’s progression, shamanism and faith, the artist reflects on the circle of life, destiny, coincidence and inevitability. She is aware that human life and the present are fundamentally dependent on external factors, just like the characters in the comic books she reads.

“There was the past, and with it all the past events that happened regardless of my potential choices;  there’s the present, with happenings that are the result of chances and choices of my own;  and there’s the future, which remains an open book of uncertainty regarding what may or may not happen. And for me, this is a reminder that I am a fragment of this world and that most of the things are uncontrolled”, she describes.

For Yuuki Horiuchi, this is the starting point of her understanding of human life and, consequentially, of her production, which is intrinsically visible in most of her past works. More recently, the artist began pondering the relationship between these different life occurrences, their resulting emotional consequences and the way they are visually depicted in most comic books, often recurring to mnemonics.

all photos by Pilotenkueche Art Program

Yuuki Horiuchi became fascinated with how incredibly well portrayed the characters’ expressions are – weather expressing happiness, surprise, sadness or anger – and how easily one can comprehend the characters’ emotions before one starts reading the actual story. For the artist, it is possible to illustrate meaning through simple graphics. She is currently exploring the importance of shapes and graphic forms as a direct influence in their narratives, from the pages’ composition to the speech bubbles included in it. The artist investigates the recurring patterns and symbolisms present in comic books and attempts to bring them into her fine art practice.

Instead of reproducing the standard appearance of a comic book – filled with stories, figurative images and flat colours – the artist reproduces solely the layout of the page using both organic and geometric shapes in shades of gray and blue pastels. These resemble translucent spaces entirely devoid of matter, and the speech bubbles particularly allude to the cosmos. The investigation is done through oil painting, although the artist dares to paint as one would with watercolour. This resemblance of the watercolour technique is even more evident in the artist’s paintings on paper, in which the marks dissolve fluently and unpredictably throughout the surface. When working in monochrome, this dissolution can also resemble etching. Yuuki Horiuchi is interested in discovering the different ways of how the audience receives these graphic elements in painting, as more layers are added through the use of brush strokes and fluid mediums.

Yuuki Horiuchi holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from the Fine Arts in Tokyo University of the Arts, in Japan, and has also completed an exchange programme at Glasgow School of Art, in United Kingdom. The artist has taken part in many artistic residencies, such as The Central Saint Martins’ Associate Studio Programmes (Y-AIR Exchange), in London and Youkobo Art Space (Y-AIR Exchange), in Tokyo, both in 2018. She was awarded a place at the Art Project Ideas 2017 exhibition, in Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan, and Video Field was her last solo exhibition, at Youkobo Art Space, in Tokyo.

text by Viviane Tabach and Ines Alberty

You can see Yuuki Horiuchi’s work in the four upcoming shows of round 37.

SPEECH BUBBLE

Finissage: 30.11.18 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

SPOOR

Vernissage:  14.12.18, 19h
Open:  15 – 20.12.18 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

speech bubble photo ines

In progress: Speech Bubble

Artistic endeavour can develop in a number of ways. However, it often follows a certain pattern. In the beginning one doodles and experiments with materials. Acutely aware of their surroundings, one must be open to experience in order to be inspired. There comes a point where there is something to say. This motivates the artist to use techniques old and new to create.

The artists of the 37th round are ready to talk! Speech Bubble opens Friday 23 Nov at the Alte Handelsschule. The voices of 14 artists join to create a chorus without losing their individuality. The large scale of the shabby chic auditorium has enabled the artists to work larger and the result is breathtaking. There are just a few final touches to make before it’s perfect for you.

all photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

We are pleased to announce that violinist Izabela Kałduńska will perform THE NEW SOLARISM at the vernissage. Although classically trained, in her new solo project she experiments with her instrument to find new ways of creating what she calls “dreamscapes.” Supported by a loop station, she will explore the tension between romance and darkness. 


SPEECH BUBBLE
PK @ Alte Handelsschule

facebook event

Vernissage: Fri 23 Nov 2018 7PM
Performance: Fri 23 Nov 2018 8PM
THE NEW SOLARISM by Izabela Kałduńska (Gdańsk, Poland)
violin, loop station

Open: Sat 24 Nov – Thur 29 Nov 1PM – 5PM
Finissage: Fri 30 Nov 7PM

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty

PK coordinator
maeshelle west-davies

In progress: Rutschbahn

With much excitement we are happy to announce we are almost ready for tomorrow’s vernissage of Rutschbahn. It’s been a busy week for sure, but preparation has been going on for much longer. I guess you could say that we’ve been preparing all our lives. 

Yes, anyone can learn skills, but few can allow themselves to be open to suggestion and create something from that. It is this gift that the artists of the 37th round have been using to get ready for Rutschbahn (German for playground slide). It is this childlike innocence that they’ve been able to tap into in order to climb the ladder and slide into the unknown.

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

Challenged by the curator to interact and engage with  the unique space that Krudebude is, the works are often playful. Alongside that lightness comes precarity. Some in reaction to life experiences and others in response to the fine balance between stability and ruin that the space finds itself in. 

As Nicholas Adamson, one of the artists, so elegantly put it, 

The title ‘Rutschbahn’ invites one to ‘play’, or to return to an innocent state of mind. As artists, we engage in this uninhibited state when we create work. But at the end of the day, we ultimately must return to the so-called ‘real world’. This body of work navigates around these opposing visions to occupy the space in between work and dream, object and figment, and reality and fantasy. 


Rutschbahn // PK @ Krudebude

Vernissage Fri 16 Nov 2018 7PM
Performance Fri 16 Nov 2018 8PM
IT CONCERNS YOU by Reinhold Ponesch and Tamaki Kawaguchi

Open Sat 17 Nov – Wed 21 Nov 5PM – 8PM
Finissage Thur 22 Nov 2018 7PM

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)

Local Artist
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Elias Emtanes

PK coordinator
maeshelle west-davies