Tag Archives: Photography

Artist Spotlight: Tamara Jacquin

Tamara always starts her work with the human body, its senses and experiences. She is convinced that the human body carries both carnal experience as well as emotional heritage. In her work she explores human emotions and basic needs, whilst keeping in mind our natural bond with the natural world and need for a shelter.

Tamara works extensively with natural landscapes, trying to bring them into the city environment. Hence materials used may be site-specific or selected to evoke and recreate a certain sensation. She works extensively with wood, steel and silk, but also integrates plants and even her own hair. Tamara’s work is mainly three-dimensional, but includes photography and poetry. She believes that poetry is a great outlet of the soul and it helps to look deeply within. Tamara writes her own poetry and appreciates the works of Alejandra Pizarnik and Raúl Zurita.

Before turning to Fine Arts, she completed architectural studies. Though Tamara found herself unhappy within the architectural field, there are clear traces of it in her art practice. A good representation of her personal journey is a series called “Body architecture” which showcases the process and struggles she accumulated in this quest as well as the questions she had posed. How do we build ourselves? What constructs us? Which constructions repress us? How do we navigate social canons; what society expects from a woman; all the standardised norms one must comply with in addition to the baggage of one’s family history.

Tamara searched for answers in nature. She used her art practice as an outlet to tell her story as well as to declare her artist manifesto. We are animals that come from the wilderness and we shouldn’t lose this bond with it. Tamara continues to explore this question and is playing with an idea of a refuge. An intimate shelter that allows a person to think and connect with surroundings, earth, sky and oneself.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

When recounting her latest piece, she speaks of an inner sensation she felt when standing in front of a tree, that which cannot be described in words. Tamara stresses: “You can feel it and not intellectually perceive it.” Her piece is a memory of an encounter with the landscape. When speaking of her artwork Tamara says: “It is a dream, it’s not a construct. As a dream it doesn’t have to be perfect!” Accordingly, her work has an airy quality to it, allowing space for free interpretation, encouraging the viewer to use their own imagination to awaken their senses.

Tamara says that she could easily spend a whole day in repose, simply visualising, thinking and examining a concept. When she has solved the puzzle in her head, she starts the execution. Tamara grew up as an only child and she spent a lot of time in her fantasy world, imagining things and playing on her own. Also, today her ideas are born in the same way; an artist desires to fuel the imagination of the viewer. Tamara wishes to bring them closer to the nature, even if it is just in their own imagination.

photos supplied by artist

For more information and visual insight head over to Tamara’s website.

Lichtspiel des Westens

film: Entrepasos
Karl Heine
Saturday 7 December 2019
16.00 – 22.00

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: David Elias Schilling

David is back! He is a Vienna-based artist, born in Leipzig and has spent his founding years here. Now he is at PILOTENKUECHE, rediscovering and appreciating his home city with a fresh pair of eyes. After 12 years in Vienna, he is observing the changes that Leipzig has undergone. But he has also changed. He is able to use his accumulated knowledge to discover new facets of his childhood Leipzig. The adult David is finding this new perspective on the past a very interesting experience.

His Leipziger roots manifest throughout David’s work. Knowing his family history and that of the city, we can understand David’s art on a more personal level. He grew up near the coal mines and his grandfather was employed within the industry. David childhood was informed by stories of the coal quarries and exposure to the landscape on a daily basis. He praises the aesthetic power of quarries. “It is like a hurricane” he says, describing the visual impact of the “moonlike landscape”.

David is a painter, who has also received professional training in photography. Thus, occasionally he utilises both disciplines in his practice. He found that photography alone was too clean as a medium and limiting in certain ways, whereas in painting David was able to integrate the momentum, the energy and the movement that is present throughout the creation. He also mentions that the lines and shapes on the paper trace artists’ morphology, adding an additional quality. Therefore, David uses large formats as they give more space for physical freedom and an opportunity to interact with the piece in a bodily manner.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Although his approach to painting is very expressive, David is very attentive to the detail and thoughtful about the materials he chooses. The choice of medium is tightly knitted to his birthplace and early exposures. David’s paintings have a very graphic aesthetic to them, he’s work channels the métier of contemporary drawing. He paints almost exclusively on paper using charcoal, ink and graphite, producing high contrast images.
He prefers to work on paper as it is less eternal than canvas, outlining the value of the present moment. The use of charcoal is self-explanatory, but is not by accident why he uses solely a specific brand of ink. David says to have a nostalgic connection with the ink from Rohrer & Klingner (a company established in Leipzig in.1907). This ink was the top choice in schools, used by children to learn writing.

He is also a gardener. His love for botany was ignited when he was assigned a tiny corner in the family garden. His corner plot grew bigger and bigger with each passing year. Now he can proudly speak about his collection of flowers, particularly his wild roses. As a gardener David is enchanted by the change of season, especially the springtime when nature comes back to life out of nothing. He is equally fascinated by the seeds and their ability to stay dormant for decades, just to be awakened by the right circumstances. Currently, whilst back in Leipzig, David is researching plants that are reappearing in Leipzig’s old quarries.
Within his art practice he integrates motifs of flowers, plays with their symbolism and creates harmonious Ikebanas. He is intrigued by Japanese zen gardens as well as tea rituals and Japanese ink painting.

David is a curious person and a multifaceted artist. David adores opera, he will be the one who is humming or whistling a fragment from a classical piece. Currently he is smitten by Shostakovich 11th symphony, but obviously being born in Leipzig he had the love for Bach placed in his cradle. David is interested in Bach’s’ approach to composing, his use of mathematical principles, Fibonacci sequence as well as numerology. David tries to apply these techniques himself, he studies principles of harmony, but is mesmerised by contrasts.
He is attracted by Vanitas and recognises both the beautiful and the ugly, We need both. David says: ”It is life, there is dirt and it is beautiful!”.

David manages to interweave various disciplines, techniques, personal history and symbols in a surprisingly harmonic and balanced way, creating art pieces that complement each other and form a complete oneness. Though one doesn’t have to recognize the information embedded to appreciate aesthetics of his work.


images supplied by artist


See his work at the following shows:

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Open:
Sat 16 / Sun 17
Thur 21 / Fri 22 / Sat 23
14:00 bis 18:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Ingrid Pumayalla

Ingrid has a special connection to the ancient roots of the earth. She is bound with nature, symbols and rituals. She has a specific sort of respect for shamans, knowing them not as witches but instead as the wise people who knew the knowledge of herbs and health and secrets of nature.

Her professional path took a new directlon when she was a student in university. She decided to stop studying business administration and redirect her time and energy to her old desire of being an artist. She purposely chose to study at a photography school in Lima, which was founded in 90’s and focused on psychoanalysis and photography. Now she had the time and insight to look and see what photography meant to her, conceptually and technically.

“Photography changed my state of mind and relationship with the world,” says Ingrid. The portrait project she did of her family, left her with a deep impact and some sort of internal emotional healing. Because her family are immigrants, she had to travel around to make a portrait of them. The experience was like putting bones of a body back together again. Migration is a painful phenomenon within Peru, the history goes back to 70’s when people from rural areas started going to big cities. Due to colonization, they have lost nature, language and this was with the feeling of displacement, violence, loosing identity and home. It is also important for her to contribute to preserving Quechua (Inca’s native language) as a Peruvian artist.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Her thirst for making art took her to London. She still works with Photography but her studies in M.A. of fine art opened a space for thinking even wider. “Not just clicking and see what comes out after, but also the process of photography, directing a photo and the dialog you can have with the space and all the surroundings in a photo including the performance in the course of the photography,” said Ingrid.

Ingrid’s Peruvian origins has her telling stories. She tells me a memory about a Shaman who gave her a cup of his potion and tell her “now I’m giving you the Art”. In shamanic culture Art means knowledge to heal and see yourself and your environment and find what you have lost. Going to a shamanic ceremony got her thinking, what those individuals were trying to find. In a post-colonial community, what have people lost collectively. It makes her question the active role of an artist in the position of having that “Art” in a society as a shaman in a community, this makes the fundament of her work, her concern and her quest.

Her enthusiasm for story telling furthers her works in making film. Currently Ingrid is doing photography and filmmaking alongside with other mediums such as wool, stones, woods and etc. for making installations and performances.

Here in PILOTENKEUCHE her project is a fusion of parallel methods specifically textiles and knitting skill from Quichuan culture and language, In a figurative narration of an oral story or a myth. The myth is about now and about the fires in the Amazon, 20 years of deforesting Peruvian Amazon, combined with the concept of migration and with the strong play of nature.

written by Elnaz

image supplied by artist


you can find out more about Ingrid on her website, and you can come down to the following shows to see more of what she is doing.

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

performance: Ingrid Pumayalla

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Lichtspiel des Westens

Karl Heine
Saturday 7 December 2019
16.00 – 22.00

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Coffee Kang

Coffee Kang is an artist encompassing many different worlds, all moving and shifting seemingly under her feet but she takes it in stride. It’s all impermanent, all part of the process. Having moved from China to Los Angeles to complete a Masters in photo media from the California Institute of the Arts she is now based in Southern California where she focuses her body of work on varying situations – how do we change spaces, how do spaces change us and how does culture affect these changes? As she creates meaning through her work we are invited to ask our own questions: how does process inform meaning? What is the importance of performance in relation to achieving a specific goal? These themes come up in Coffee’s time-based works, and so much more.

As she navigates her personal narrative using photo media, video and primarily performance centered pieces, the temporality of the medium helps to inform her personal and cultural historicity while trying to connect to a grander whole. This fluctuation, or state of flowing, relates back to how we move in certain spaces and how our culture affects perception as well as physical space. In this connection comes an exploration of inherited culture, identity and the power of the individual within a system.

While Coffee’s work changes in form it is comfortably placed within a tradition of performance and process, ultimately landing somewhere in the conceptualization and activities of Fluxus. In this established mode of creating ‘process matters more than the result’. This is the crux of the meaning making. It is not about a product, or even some intangible end result. More important, here, is the journey in the making. The performance or action is not to achieve something but to do something.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE or courtesy of artist

These ideas are brought to life in her past works and performances, most notably in her temporal work The Funeral, wherein she performed a funeral for a previous piece. This work, titled Days in the Matchbox, was sentenced to death by a necessary move from her studio. In this way the artist created meaning out of a daily life stressor. She used the end result of moving out of her studio as a catalyst for meaning making through performance while reanimating an older piece for one final action.

In her seemingly permanent state of impermanence, or ‘current of changing’, Coffee Kang finds herself in Leipzig amidst a group of international artists all creating their own meaning within the context of the host city and more specifically within the Pilotenkueche artist residency. In this light the themes she works with can shine – they can flourish not by providing answers but by leading viewers and participants through the construction of purpose that happens within a group, within a new city, within the very process of critical thinking in both art making and art viewing.

In an attempt to explore her subconscious self, she will be looking to the stars that hang above Leipzig and the White Elster river that cuts through it. By connecting with the water flowing through the city she connects with all of the different bodies of water she has resided near, by connecting with the stars she connects not only to her inner self but to all of us that reside beneath them.

written by Adrian Klaus Rotzscher

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See Coffee’s work in the following Pilotenkueche International Art Program shows: 

Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

Wrestling with Impermanence 

Vernissage: Fri 21 June 2019, 7PM
Open: Sat 22 – Wed 26 June 2019 1PM-5PM
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
Performance: To be announced

Artist spotlight: Paul Altmann

When walking in the Oststrasse one can stumble upon a store with a charming interior accommodating a range of vintage objects carefully curated by the owners. This new space, formerly a butcher store dating from 1900 whose history is visible on the bluish ceramic tiles, was founded in 2017 by PK local artist Paul Altmann and his partner Antje Schaper. FANG studio works not only as a store for collected rarities, graphics and artworks, but is mutually a studio for two of them and an exhibition space. When visiting, one can also have a cup of coffee or chai and have a chat with Paul. He tells me how this multi-purpose space is their attempt to live a dream of free and open minded work, but is a hard job.

Along with running the gallery, within his art practice this Leipziger chooses political themes to address as a way to handle complexity of the world and times we are in. With photography and video as his main mediums, Paul dwells into wide range of practices; (de)constructing small models for the camera, appropriating found archival photographs, creating video loops, constructing installations in gallery space, text installations on the streets, and much more.

With a strong graphic appearance his images showcase the suggestive power of metaphorically peeling off, but also literally- melting, what we will see later, the real and concrete into a symbol. These symbols in becoming are in a certain way already symbols or simulations constructed by the media and society; toys exercising violence, small models apparently disarmed of previous power, print screens of videos questioning the real in the digital world, revealed conditions and provenance of social games such as Monopoly.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program or supplied by Paul

Act of deducement happens. What is photographed is transited into something else. Here we encounter a ‘quasi identity’ in R.Barthes’ term. In his early work DAVID & NELSON, a simple model is built for the camera that becomes surely recognizable only when slowly deconstructed in a video loop, behaving as a destruction. Now, we certainly know that this is an abstraction of the smoldering of World Trade Center. Here again, an interpretation of a media image is encountered. If one agrees with W.J.Mitchell’s observation that this terrorist act was staged for the camera, we can notice range of Paul’s work sharing similar approach.

To recognize and not take it for granted that photography is always engaged with other media is what we call photo mediation. Paul recognizes this, and questions the pictures that are becoming future history. In this way he is positioning himself among artists that are challenging the uncritical and lazy piling up of the visual. Mostly news are his starting points; news to be thought as already existing images and news echoing those that are yet to come. Paul (re)depicts these with an ambivalent approach since his tendency to illustrate is without ambition to blame or polarize, but possibly to start debates.

In the past few months, Paul returned back to the models and toys as a main referent for addressing their relation to violence. He has been collecting toy guns in order to melt them down and photograph their transition. The toy shifts to an object stripped from its purpose which is a simulation itself; to allow children to mimic attack, and eventually war. Nowadays, they remind us on the presence of violence and are charged with agony of contemporary events.

Overall, much of his work engages with violence in an aesthetic and not directly disturbing way. His ‘transitions’ cause an odd feeling; revealing the media they are engaging with. Going through them with accompanied texts, we gain new knowledge. In The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography, writer Lyle Rexel points out that it is in the condition of contemporary photographs to ‘arrive now within a set of quotation marks’. Here again we return to photo mediation, when images influence others, even the most banal ones. In future encounters with similar referents, Paul’s work will inevitably be one of the quotes.

written by Samra Šabanović 

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Unfinished Hase

15 Feb – 23 Feb 2019
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist Spotlight: Charles Park

 Photographing environmental interventions is how Charles describes his work when you meet him. An hour after he will take an awkward photo of you. Charles is severely enthusiastic about sneaking his film camera flash in front of one’s face, in order to catch, mostly an awkward but sometimes decently beautiful expression. To be fair, the developed photographs that he brings to our tables with a smile on his face are definitely honest and vulnerable portraits of all of us.

However, this is not what his artistic practice is all about. In his photographic work, he becomes less spontaneous and gives place to conceptualizing an image beforehand. Here we enter a more silent space; a stillness of a landscape, random forests and bushes covered with pink stripes, abandoned places, and secluded indistinguishable objects collected out of a landfill.

Charles does not record passively, but rather approaches the ‘photographic’ with interventions and deliberate constructions in an environment. This is his way of highlighting camouflaged properties exposing what is hidden before us. His practice aims for revealing and concealing the outside environment, which is what photography itself as a medium does. However, Charles confirms and emphasizes the both exposing and masking as a paradox, mainly in physical interventions he stages for his camera- returning himself, and us for that matter, to the never completely graspable language of photography.

His working process sometimes involves using a metal detector to investigate the hidden in a specific landscape, but also could mean spending a whole night in an abandoned building in Leipzig. In this particular case, he observed the light behavior on the building’s walls and reversed its function into a camera chamber. Here, he took the imperfections of the space and captured the light that beams across on daily basis. The colored designs highlight and help in understanding the layout of the architecture but also the placement of the concrete foundation in relation to the sun.

Heavily influenced by the surrounding landscape of southern California, specifically the severe drought and bush fires, his images reflect the shadows of those of ruins, products of human destructive hand and nature’s inevitable reaction. Photography has always had a strong relationship with geography. In today’s post-photography, when its practice and history is being challenged, it still holds an important role of transferring the invisible in the new geological era we have entered. For the exhibition Unfinished Hase Charles presented himself with a ‘double revealed’ by additionally inverting the colors of the final reproduction of the site intervention, in order to expose what is hidden in the very image itself.

All photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program or courtesy of Charles Park

In Leipzig, what grabs his attention mostly are abandoned buildings, those stripped from their function multiple times. Ruins as ‘imperial debris’ or ‘architecture of oblivion’ to borrow these terms from two book titles, are strongly attached to Germany’s history where architectonic structures have been changing as governments and wars altered them. With new investigations of these places, Charles projects a capsule into the past. Furthermore, inhabiting them means a reunion with the present’s heterogeneity and recognizing its rich texture.

Born in Los Angeles, he has spent countless hours driving through southern California. This perhaps immediately recalls the American photography tradition that has been inspiring a variety of artists still today- the road trip. However, Charles did not take a record of the scenery as his main ambition, but primarily it helped him experience the terrain in a different way- on the move. This frequent driving through has helped him, so he speaks, to understand a diverse Eco climate in only a one day’s work. On the other hand, New York, where he currently lives and obtained his MFA from Parsons the New School for Art and Design, proved that he does not work well in limited space areas.

Knowing all of this, it comes as no surprise that we do not see Charles working in the studio often, but mostly chatting with us. To the greatest extent his work happens outside and on the move while he is appreciating the tranquility of the city. He is strongly determined to overcome the challenges in clearing out his image ideas into our world and focusing on controlling the scene in front of him, with only occasional bad weather standing in his way.

Written by Samra Šabanović

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Unfinished Hase

15 Feb – 23 Feb 2019
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Work in progress: Setup of the Final Exhibition // 21.09.18

After two and a half months of the program, the artists are preparing for the final exhibition in the studio rooms of Pilotenkueche. With the support of the curator, positions are negotiated, new combinations of artworks are discovered, and even walls find new homes as the studio undergoes a metamorphosis in the days leading up to the opening on Friday, which will include work from each of our international residents and local participants, as well as performances from guest artists. 

All photos by Pilotenkueche

“CORPORAL TEMPERATURE”/ international group exhibition

Opening: 21.09.18, 18h
Open: 22.09 – 25.09.18, 10h-15h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

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Program: 21.09.2018

18h Opening
19h 0000                  Chelsea Markuson, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
20h Book of Secrets Beate Körner, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
        Strings               Ando Saori, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
21h Rosalind Franklin – Sound Performance
22h+ Aftershow

Artists

International residents
Arabella Hilfiker (Painting, Printmaking, Book Art; Cambridge, UK)
Chelsea Markuson (Installation, Drawing, Performance; East Lansing, Michigan, USA)
Jing Tan (Sculpture, Performance; China/London, UK)
Curtis Welteroth (Installation, Painting; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA)
Lily Cummins (Drawing, Installation; Darlinghurst, Australia)
Maya Perry (Drawing, Animation, Sound; Tel Aviv, Israel)
Nathan Jay Brooker (Painting; Perth, Australia)
Simona Reisch (Photography ; Vienna, Austria)

Local Participants
Beate Körner (Performance, Conceptual; Leipzig, Germany)
Undine Bandelin (Painting; Leipzig, Germany)

Curator
Vanessa Souli (Writer, Artist Manager; Berlin, Germany / Greece)

Assistants
Alex Davidson (Social Media, PR, Promotion; Edinburgh, UK)
Brodie Weir (Art Management, Art History; Orwell, UK)

Piloten Küche round 36 Vanessa Soli, Curtis Welteroth, Lily Cummins. photo maeshelle west-davies

Re-View: Consultation // 11.09.18

Curator Vanessa Souli selects works for “CORPORAL TEMPERATURE”, round 36 final show. Curating a show is much more than just hanging some pictures. A bad install can ruin the whole thing. Works should engage and empower each other. In order to get a complete picture of the deeper meaning behind each of the artists’ works, Vanessa Souli speaks with each artist individually.  She has also been here throughout the entire round and has been able to witness  how working in a foreign environment with new people has influenced both the work and the artists, themselves.

The Final Exhibition of our residents from the US, Japan, Argentina, UK, Germany, Austria, China, and Taiwan, will present ongoing work after three months spent at the residency. This round of artists had a particular focus on painting, textile art, installation, sculpture, and performance, and one sound artist who also will contribute their work to the program of the Final Show.

All photos by Pilotenkueche

 

“CORPORAL TEMPERATURE”/ international group exhibition

Opening: 21.09.18, 18h
Open: 22.09 – 25.09.18, 10h-15h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Find this event on Facebook

Program: 21.09.2018

18h Opening
19h 0000
Chelsea Markuson, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
20h Book of Secrets
Beate Körner, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
Strings
Ando Saori, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
21h Rosalind Franklin – Sound Performance
22h+ Aftershow

Artists

International residents
Arabella Hilfiker (Painting, Printmaking, Book Art; Cambridge, UK)
Chelsea Markuson (Installation, Drawing, Performance; East Lansing, Michigan, USA)
Jing Tan (Sculpture, Performance; China/London, UK)
Curtis Welteroth (Installation, Painting; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA)
Lily Cummins (Drawing, Installation; Darlinghurst, Australia)
Maya Perry (Drawing, Animation, Sound; Tel Aviv, Israel)
Nathan Jay Brooker (Painting; Perth, Australia)
Simona Reisch (Photography ; Vienna, Austria)

Local Participants
Beate Körner (Performance, Conceptual; Leipzig, Germany)
Undine Bandelin (Painting; Leipzig, Germany)

Curator
Vanessa Souli (Writer, Artist Manager; Berlin, Germany / Greece)

Assistants
Alex Davidson (Social Media, PR, Promotion; Edinburgh, UK)
Brodie Weir (Art Management, Art History; Orwell, UK)

The PILOTENKUECHE art program is an independent project, open to artists of all nationalities. The common goal of the final group exhibition leads to intensive dialogue about individual ideas and practices, and binds each artist temporarily into a group, leading to a long term network that exists even after the residency is over.

Artist Talks: “Space Chorus” // 30.08.18

Here are a few impressions of this weeks artist talks at the Alte Handelsschule exhibition Space Chorus with the latest residents from the UK, Israel, Japan, China, Australia, Argentina and the US. We gained an insight on the current approaches at our studios, highlighting diverse methods of negotiation between space, object, and interpretation. This round has an interest in reinterpreting tradition, pinching social norms, and using interdisciplinary methods in ways that are both playful and sincere. 

All photos by Pilotenkueche

For those who were unable to attend, feel free to join us at the Finissage on August 31st at 19:00h! 

We are excited to show you what we have been working on this round, and hope to see you there!

Artists

International residents
Ando Saori (Performance, Choreography, Video, Photography; Osaka, Japan / Bielefeld,
Germany)
Arabella Hilfiker (Painting, Printmaking, Book Art; Cambridge, UK)
Chelsea Markuson (Installation, Drawing, Performance; East Lansing, Michigan, USA)
Curtis Welteroth (Installation, Painting; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA)
Jing Tan (Sculpture, Performance; China/London, UK)
Lily Cummins (Drawing, Installation; Darlinghurst, Australia)
Maya Perry (Drawing, Animation, Sound; Tel Aviv, Israel)
Nathan Jay Brooker (Painting; Perth, Australia)
Simona Reisch (Photography ; Vienna, Austria)
Zoe Trilnick Farji (Collage, Mixed Media, Poetry ; Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Local Participants
Beate Körner (Performance, Conceptual; Leipzig, Germany)
Undine Bandelin (Painting; Leipzig, Germany)

Curator
Vanessa Souli (Writer, Artist Manager; Berlin, Germany / Greece)

Assistants
Alex Davidson (Social Media, PR, Promotion; Edinburgh, UK)
Brodie Weir (Art Management, Art History; Orwell, UK)

 

Final Exhibition // “CORPORAL TEMPERATURE” of the 36th round / 21.09.18

The Final Exhibition of our residents from the US, Japan, UK, Germany, Austria, and China, will present ongoing work after three months spent at the residency. This round of artists had a particular focus on painting, textile art, installation, sculpture, and performance, and one sound artist who also will contribute their work to the program of the Final Show.

Here are impressions of their most recent preview exhibition, realized and displayed at the space of our partner Alte Handelsschule:

All photos by Pilotenkueche

We are also pleased to incorporate the work of our local participants,  as well as our guest artists featured during the program of the opening night at our studios. 

“CORPORAL TEMPERATURE”/ international group exhibition

Opening:  21.09.18, 19h
Open:  22.09 – 25.09.18 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Find this event on Facebook

Program: 21.09.2018
18h – Opening
19h – 0000 – Chelsea Markuson, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
20h – Book of Secrets – Beate Körner, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
        – Strings – Ando Saori, Resident of the 36th round – Performance
21h – Rosalind Franklin – Sound Performance
22h – Aftershow

Artists

International residents
Ando Saori (Performance, Choreography, Video, Photography; Osaka, Japan / Bielefeld,
Germany)
Arabella Hilfiker (Painting, Printmaking, Book Art; Cambridge, UK)
Chelsea Markuson (Installation, Drawing, Performance; East Lansing, Michigan, USA)
Curtis Welteroth (Installation, Painting; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA)
Jing Tan (Sculpture, Performance; China/London, UK)
Lily Cummins (Drawing, Installation; Darlinghurst, Australia)
Maya Perry (Drawing, Animation, Sound; Tel Aviv, Israel)
Nathan Jay Brooker (Painting; Perth, Australia)
Simona Reisch (Photography ; Vienna, Austria)

Local Participants
Beate Körner (Performance, Conceptual; Leipzig, Germany)
Undine Bandelin (Painting; Leipzig, Germany)

Curator
Vanessa Souli (Writer, Artist Manager; Berlin, Germany / Greece)

Assistants
Alex Davidson (Social Media, PR, Promotion; Edinburgh, UK)
Brodie Weir (Art Management, Art History; Orwell, UK)

 

We hope to see and meet you during our events!