Tag Archives: Installation

Artist Spotlight: Ingrid Pumayalla

Ingrid has a special connection to the ancient roots of the earth. She is bound with nature, symbols and rituals. She has a specific sort of respect for shamans, knowing them not as witches but instead as the wise people who knew the knowledge of herbs and health and secrets of nature.

Her professional path took a new directlon when she was a student in university. She decided to stop studying business administration and redirect her time and energy to her old desire of being an artist. She purposely chose to study at a photography school in Lima, which was founded in 90’s and focused on psychoanalysis and photography. Now she had the time and insight to look and see what photography meant to her, conceptually and technically.

“Photography changed my state of mind and relationship with the world,” says Ingrid. The portrait project she did of her family, left her with a deep impact and some sort of internal emotional healing. Because her family are immigrants, she had to travel around to make a portrait of them. The experience was like putting bones of a body back together again. Migration is a painful phenomenon within Peru, the history goes back to 70’s when people from rural areas started going to big cities. Due to colonization, they have lost nature, language and this was with the feeling of displacement, violence, loosing identity and home. It is also important for her to contribute to preserving Quechua (Inca’s native language) as a Peruvian artist.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Her thirst for making art took her to London. She still works with Photography but her studies in M.A. of fine art opened a space for thinking even wider. “Not just clicking and see what comes out after, but also the process of photography, directing a photo and the dialog you can have with the space and all the surroundings in a photo including the performance in the course of the photography,” said Ingrid.

Ingrid’s Peruvian origins has her telling stories. She tells me a memory about a Shaman who gave her a cup of his potion and tell her “now I’m giving you the Art”. In shamanic culture Art means knowledge to heal and see yourself and your environment and find what you have lost. Going to a shamanic ceremony got her thinking, what those individuals were trying to find. In a post-colonial community, what have people lost collectively. It makes her question the active role of an artist in the position of having that “Art” in a society as a shaman in a community, this makes the fundament of her work, her concern and her quest.

Her enthusiasm for story telling furthers her works in making film. Currently Ingrid is doing photography and filmmaking alongside with other mediums such as wool, stones, woods and etc. for making installations and performances.

Here in PILOTENKEUCHE her project is a fusion of parallel methods specifically textiles and knitting skill from Quichuan culture and language, In a figurative narration of an oral story or a myth. The myth is about now and about the fires in the Amazon, 20 years of deforesting Peruvian Amazon, combined with the concept of migration and with the strong play of nature.

written by Elnaz

image supplied by artist


you can find out more about Ingrid on her website, and you can come down to the following shows to see more of what she is doing.

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

performance: Ingrid Pumayalla

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Lichtspiel des Westens

Karl Heine
Saturday 7 December 2019
16.00 – 22.00

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Mirjam Bürer

Mirjam has an affinity for spaces. Her dreams are very much involved with space. They appear with strong feelings of existence and memories. By spaces, she means a room, a garden, inside a bag, the figures shaped between the trees and so on. Nature is an indispensable part of her work. Her enthusiasm for spending time with nature is the core of her inspirations and even her decisions.

Collecting original seeds is a mission for Mirjam. Prior to 1994, she recognised climate change as a longstanding phenomenon. She saw that mono-cultures were forcing the farmers to use genetically manipulated seeds. At the same time the factories were delivering insecticide seeds in the same buckets and were pushing them on the farmers. However farmers were planting original seeds in their small private gardens. “People keeping the original seeds in the most important room of the house, because it’s the source of the food and all the genetic materials are in the seeds,” said Mirjam. Now when plants have defects, she has the original seeds to be able to feed humanity.

She has taught art at a visual art school for 30 years. Teaching was quite intensive and she moved studios often, but never stopped producing her own projects. She has traveled around the world because her work is multi-layered and looks to the outside while the source is deep inside her. She has been in Pakistan, Himalaya, Indonesia, North India and many more places in east Asia. For her, as an artist based in Netherlands, traveling to these countries and experiencing the culture and landscape of these lands intimately, has opened the doors of a different world.

Photos by PILOTENKÜCHE International Art program

Her Book “Local is global” was initiated in a collaborative project with Netherland’s University museum and biology scientists. “It was another eye opener to work as an artist and collaborate with scientists,” she says. The book took her to Korea. She changed the title to “Gross national happiness” in 2001. That’s the quote used in Bhutan: gross national happiness instead of gross national product.

It’s important for her to get involved while traveling, staying for a while, getting to know the people, and make her works with fresh inspirations from local landscapes and people. That’s why she doesn’t carry her art works around. “When I’m triggered with something I have to make it,” Says Mirjam.

There has not been much time for her to make exhibition for a long time and now she is here to have her time to focus on her work again. She wants to have her own interpretation of the kleingartens of the city. Maybe this will manifest in making her own plan of green lounges of Leipzig playing around industrial spaces or maybe in a small collaboration with other artists in the residency. For the final exhibition, she plans to make an installation of movie compilation, drawing and space of the elements that she was freshly engaged with.

written by Elnaz Mostaan


you can find more of Mirjam’s work in her Website. As well she will exhibit her works in the following events.

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00
PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Hungry Dungeon Friends Curatorial Tour

First and foremost, we’d like to thank everyone who packed the house for our Hungry Dungeon Friends vernissage at Kunstkraftwerk. The evening was one that still has people thinking nearly a week after. For those who missed it, the show is on until Sunday 1 September.

This Saturday at 3PM, our curator in residence, Colette Patterson will be giving a tour. Come find out what is behind the high quality works created by our International artists. We will also be gifted with a performance by Tom Austin.

Meanwhile, here are some images from the install and the vernissage shot by Stanley Louis, one of this round’s interns.

Hungry exchanges are often communicated through the affective fields of our bodies. The body-organism is linked to the world through a network of primal signifiers. An underworld of currents, there are some conversations that can only take place on the borders, on the edge of ourselves, of our contact with the other. The exhibition tries to circulate these borders, these textures, these interiorities, that are viscous, unformed, multiple and many times. We morph between states of consciousness, mapping unknown desires. This exhibition is the interim show of the Pilotenkeuche residents, and explores the possibility to traverse these spaces, inviting a tactile sensibility, and begs to ask what happens in a dungeon with friends? 

text by curator Colette Patterson


Hungry Dungeon Friends

Saturday 24 August
Curatorial Tour by Colette Patterson
performance by 
Tom Alexander Austin

open 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)– 

Artist Spotlight: Marijn Roos Lindgreen

Is the space rigid or rather plastic? Where is the border between inside and outside? What would happen if outside became inside and inside became outside? Those and many other questions are addressed by Marijn Roos Lindgreen, Netherlands based artist, in her sophisticated installations.

My work is focused on the immediate space, space that is directly around us. It’s something that happens all the time. It’s impossible not to be in the space. I am curious how you can influence this feeling of being in the space. When I come somewhere, I try to understand how I feel there. Then I try recreate this experience of a space in my art work”.  

Marijn comes from the field of architecture. After she finished high school, she was determined to do something creative, but at the same time technically orientated. Thus, Marijn obtained her Bachelor’s degree in architecture at Technical University of Delft. Later on, during her Master’s she specialized in Interior Architecture, which she studied at Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam. “Architecture definitely had a big impact on my art work. It not only made me think of how people relate to space in general but also it made me more conscious about how I experience space myself”.

Although she really enjoyed studying architecture, Marijn felt that what she wanted to do was a little bit too crazy for this field. She was always more into constructing utopic and futuristic buildings rather than practical ones. Today in her art practice she combines theoretical concepts of architecture and philosophy as well as real life examples. Marijn likes working with figures and forms that we are all familiar with and using them in unusual, sometimes unexpected ways, but she also wants people to interact with her art within the space. For instance, in one of Marijn’s installations visitors were invited to go through doorways that had to evoke in them the feeling of entering the space without actually entering it.

Marijn also likes to play with different materials, starting from plexiglass, pigment, to sand and wood. The choice of materials depends on what fits best each project. In the upcoming exhibition she will be dealing with the topic of transparency and wax is going to be her main material. She chose wax for its flexibility but also for its temporality. “In my art practice I often work with the opposites. Therefore, I like materials that are both solid and breakable. I like to see how it can change over time”. During her residency at Pilotenkueche Marjin will be deliberating on how she can make something that can exist as a single object in a space.

It’s quite difficult to predict what the outcome will look like. Marijn belongs to those young artists who are still in process of discovering and experimenting with styles and techniques. “I would say I am still searching for my personal style. However, my work becomes more and more consistent with every project. Now I am more satisfied with the final result as it reflexes the initial idea I had in mind. Besides, I get a lot of positive comments on my art work from public lately”. Being an emerging artist, Marijn doesn’t yet know how your career will develop in the future. But one thing is for sure – she doesn’t want to be placed in the gallery or museum permanently. She prefers people encounter her work in more natural setting.

written by Kristina Nizamova

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You can see Marijn’s work in the following Pilotenkueche International Art Program shows:

Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

Wrestling with Impermanence 

Vernissage: Fri 21 June 2019, 7PM
Open: Sat 22 – Wed 26 June 2019 1PM-5PM
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
Performance: To be announced

Artist spotlight:Valentine Emilia Bossert

“I don’t understand why I exist. I find it very confusing”. Valentine expresses how her artistic output is her way of making sense of stuff. Though, she also interrogates the idea of ‘sense’. How can there be sense when there is so much chaos and so many ideas and so many memories. She is an advocate of the concept of collective consciousness. If we were all to share common beliefs, common ideas and moral attitudes, could this lead us to a state of sense? Though not explicit, there are underlying suggestions to utopia and dystopia in Valentines work – always questioning the encounters of humanity and to where we are heading.

Existentialism. (/ɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃ(ə)lɪz(ə)m/)

noun

  1. a philosophical theory or approach which emphasises the existence of the individual person as a free and responsible agent determining their own development through acts of the will.

Her own stories, observations, experiences; these are the roots of Valentines creations. Her most recent installation at Pilotenkueche round 38’s first exhibition (Unfinished Hase) responded to her feelings of displacement caused by a constant turn-over of location. The wall hanging was a series of floor plans drawn on thin sheets of resin, all depictions of the homes in which Valentine has lived over the past ten years. Her own journey led her to the question; what is the meaning of a home? Where do I feel at home in my life? The drawings were hung in chronological order on a structure standing adjacent from the wall, allowing the spectator to follow her journey and lack of settlement.


all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Valentine began studying Medical Science in Geneva. It was there she began life drawing classes, “it was the only time of the week I was happy”. The medical sciences became boring and meaningless to her. At the age of 20, having decided that she was not feeling any sense of achievement and was worried about a linear future, Valentine decided to leave Medicine behind and unpick the layers of humanity via an artistic practice. She underwent a BA in Drawing at Camberwell College, UAL then an MA in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University.

When asked about her most successful piece, Valentine refers to her photo booth, first created and installed at a festival in Luxemburg. This piece was designed with accessibility to art in mind. By creating a photo booth, she inserted elements of playfulness and recognition. However, the “photographs” which were produced were not typical photographs. Instead of a camera, inside the booth was a variety of artists, one at a time. Each artist depicted the visitor in their own interpretation and delivered the response to the visitor as a work of art. Valentine’s photo booth project is ongoing. For the Fast Kotzen exhibition Valentine plans to recreate the installation. Currently she is searching for funding to develop a way in which it can be recreated as a portable object to be installed in different locations.

After Pilotenkueche, Valentines next step is to move into her studio space in Berlin – shared with other artists and musicians. Here she will continue to explore the variations of her existence. Creating. Tailoring method to her ideas. Using different methods to deliver understandings of her presence. Oh, and a flat of her own: a temporary permanent residence.

written by Ciara Brown

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Unfinished Hase

15 Feb – 23 Feb 2019
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist Spotlight: Ludmila Hrachovinova

“Everything results from something in the past, not coming from nowhere, but rather from something familiar and approachable…” Ludmila talks about the source of her inspiration as something that reminds her of something else past.  A scent, an object, a moment, a certain movement- all of these can trigger her curiosity that leads to a vocabulary of shapes, colours, lines and textures in her drawings and paintings.

The colour palette is always taken from the colours of the reality around her.  Ludmila selects her colours carefully through experimenting with mood boards and sketches before working on larger scale pieces.  She finds it satisfying when she works with the contrasts between vivid colour and that which is blurred.  The varied areas of focus in her work is chosen intuitively, and the aesthetics are a result of her emotions and something in the subconscious that is unintentionally triggered by something around her.

Micro-perspective, human bones, bending of nature, continuation like plants growing, transmission into something else, evolution of things, shapes, corners, tubes, joints, places that bend where two parts connect or come together, all refer back to the body.  She likes the tactile qualities of the materials she draws and paints with.  By pushing, smudging, rubbing, digging, mixing, she tests the limits of expression by the materials to their fullest.

When displaying her paintings and drawings she wants the viewer to have a moment of encounter.  Her paintings are of feelings, of personal experience, and she wants the audience to have a personal experience with her works. The discovery is encouraged by the way she places the works off the wall, either hanging from the ceiling or on a structure which allows the viewer to see it from various angles and from below on ‘mattresses’.  The mattresses are fabrics stitched together with embroidery sown by hand or machine that correlates the shapes and lines of her works as a mirroring of images.  She plays with the position of the works and of the viewer, and encourages interaction.

Pilotenkueche has motivated her to work faster than her normal speed, and for the first time she explores working with pastels, which were on view at the first show at Alte Handelschule.  For the final show, she will continue to work with pastels on paper, and expand to larger works in oil.  How she will display them and what memories we will tap into will only be discovered during the show.

written by mihyun maria kim

Feature image by Charles Park.

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Unfinished Hase

15 Feb – 23 Feb 2019
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist Spotlight: Isabelle Kuzio

“I’ve got seven fly swatters, if you need one.” Isabelle allows herself to take part in buying as a form of research, an ironic response to her concerns in consumer culture and economic theory. Other things which occupy Izzy’s studio space: slime, croc shoes, glittery rubber cockroaches, a bicycle helmet, a collection of shiny fabrics and other apparently misplaced items. Each day as she enters the studio with her industrial sized bag over her shoulder, I am curious to discover which playful objects are gathered inside. Perhaps an unintentional performance in itself.

Collecting is a part of the process. Izzy’s archive of objects has been gathered over time, some of them new shiny objects bought here in Leipzig, others having travelled with her from Edmonton, Canada – her home town. When she buys an object, she is often not sure what they will become.

“Sometimes I have an object for years before it becomes a part of my art” explains Izzy.

Though, after a month of gathering items in her studio at Pilotenkueche, Izzy had founded a pattern of function in some of the objects. Each were an extension of the body. Objects to be worn, carried, held, used by the self. This realisation brought Izzy back to the question; How do we consume, wear and own objects with the desire to be perceived in a certain way?

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

“KUNST BRINGT ERKENNTIS – ERIK ERKENNT.” Erik, a six year old boy, is overwhelmed by Izzy’s installation in the Unfinished Hase vernissage. A humorously oversized charm bracelet, placed on 2×2 metre satin cushion: the room’s assertive kiss of kitsch. After experimenting with painting some of her gathered objects silver, Izzy was reminded of jewellery. Jewellery is something precious which we wear with the hope to be admired and desired.

In particular – charm bracelets. They, themselves, a symbol of Izzy’s practice of collection. “Charm bracelets are really personal as you chose what’s on them, but you only have the cliché symbols to chose from.” But her charms do not fit that of the cliché symbols. Izzy’z charms are playfully recreated from her miscellaneous items; a flipper rebranded with a heel and diamante embellishment, a sponge hulk hand with a glamorous manicure holding a smart phone, a personified croc shoe, wearing braces.

It is evident in her surreal creations that Izzy is inspired by sci-fi movies of the 70’s with her irreverent hints to a dystopian future. She speaks of the acceleration of technology, and how it has changed our relationship to everyday objects whilst allowing us to secure our humanic positions in the world.

Technology has enabled us to be more stable when it comes to fighting the unexpected wraths of nature, but when everything is made available to us with new technologies, do humans become a resource: Human capital, in which we become defined by what we provide. And maybe the most extreme form of accelerationism – a world in which humans have become obsolete.

All of the above being ideas that loom over me, as I leave my conversation with Izzy. When asked if she has any ideas of what she will create for Fast Kotzen, her next group exhibition at Pilotenkueche, Izzy explains that she will continue to explore the term Self-objectification. “I wanna do some crazy special FX make up,” she claims. Maybe a zombie, maybe a Bratz Doll. She wishes to take the focus away from her collected objects, and instead shine a light on how we self-aestheticize ourselves to become the object.

Written by Ciara Brown

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Come and see Izzy’s works in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: AL Kleiner

 

“Too much decoration distracts my thought process” confirms Adam, from the seat of his nearly empty Pilotenkueche studio.  Adam’s creative process begins with research in the form of reading. For this, he needs a blank environment. This provides him the clarity of a clean mental space in which he can grow new knowledge.

It was upon discovering the Contemporary Master Heads of the 1970’s that Adam decided to face his practice with a new attitude. After experimentation at The National Art School in Sydney, he decided to hand the paint brush over to the spectator at his graduate exhibition. Now his creations could be activated by interaction from the viewer. Adam created Micro Studios: sophisticated constructions of wall hangings, encasing canvas and painting materials. The expertise Adam gathered over years of landscape paintings translated into strict attention to detail and composition within the creation of his tangible objects.

 

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Residency

A socially engaged practice satisfies Adam in knowing that he is critiquing the “look but don’t touch” ethos of the gallery space. He is hoping to push this further during his three month stay at Pilotenkueche. After a six month break from creating his own art works, he is entering the residency with no fixed program. With an interest in German politics, Adam hopes that his practice will be somewhat shaped by the dynamics of his new location and the social situations and structures in which he finds himself. I’m curious to experience how these discoveries are translated into a multi-sensory installation.

Written by Ciara Brown

Come and see what Adam creates in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Adam Kleiner has been inquiring about the current political and environmental climate of Germany due to the rapid rise of their populist party, the AfD and their desire to strip Germany’s renewable energy plan outlined in their manifesto. The work “Nimm eine pflantze – du wirst sie brauchen” (take a plant – you’ll need it”) focuses on distributing plants in exchange for a donation to extinction rebellion, an international social movement aims to reduce the current impact of climate change via non-violent protest and civil disobedience. Each plant in the work was selected for their noted air purifying qualities which further engages with the history of Leipzig being an industrial city as well as Saxony being the highest supporters of the AfD.

Vernissage:  15.02.19, 19h
Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany


This was the 37th round

Last week we said goodbye to 2018 and, with it, our most recent residents. We will remember the ideas and collaborative spontaneity that filled the studio, but most of all their ability to play in life and through their art. We were able to bond through our collective experiences. Between our four exhibitions, our program days included day trips to Bauhaus and Halle. We saw Leipzig from many perspectives, talked to exhibiting artists, gallery owners, curators and project spaces. We toured the west with architects, went to museums and even to the Christmas market.

We danced, we laughed, but most of all: we created.

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

ReView: SPOOR

SPOOR /spʊə,spɔː/

noun
1. the track or scent of an animal.
verb
1. follow the track or scent of (an animal or person).

The aim of the final exhibition resulting from 37th round of the Pilotenkueche International Art Program is to raise the issue of being-in-the-world, bringing forth the notion of perception. It is “the background from which all acts stand out, and is presupposed by them”. We do not perceive isolated sense-impressions because we only see things as they relate. Our mental representations are formed by our previous experiences and future expectations. Art can capture the affective primordial contact that tends to go unnoticed. Artists are embedded and immersed in the tangible day to day world and assume a life of their own, opening themselves to metaphoric meanings by responding with forms, shapes, and colours.

Contemporary artistic process is not only about understanding technical formalities and introducing them in the art practice, but about the production of strangeness. Thus, contemporary art does not refer to a single determining judgment. In principle, the artistic process is not governed by rules and pre-established categories: these are what the artist seeks to discover and establish in their work. Contemporary art embraces sensibility – the artworks aim to capture the displacement of subjectivity through experiments and propositions that operate as a circuit breaker of the perception. It is a deflection of what is known.

all images by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

This plurality is present during the selection of artists for the program. The choices are based on the quality of their works, not in an a priori theme for each round. This means the relationships outlined between their poetics are subsequent and follow the uniqueness of the pieces produced during the residency. After three months, it is clear that all artists have sought to trace relationships with the city: its characteristics and found artefacts, each of them making their own way. 

text by curator Viviane Tabach


For the vernissage of SPOOR, Pilotenkueche was happy to host three musical performances. Violinist Izabela Kaldunska, originally from Poland,  played excerpts from her experimental work “The New Solarism”, along with some freshly created compositions. Classically trained as a pianist Elif Murat, originally from Ankara, Turkey, also presented some of her new electronic chill out pieces ‘Ellie M.’. Then the pair joined to perform as Ichor, a  collaborative project in which they compose electronic dance music. Just like the artists on the residency, Izabela and Elif  met in Leipzig.


SPOOR
14-19 Dec 2018

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty