Tag Archives: Drawing

Artist Spotlight: David Elias Schilling

David is back! He is a Vienna-based artist, born in Leipzig and has spent his founding years here. Now he is at PILOTENKUECHE, rediscovering and appreciating his home city with a fresh pair of eyes. After 12 years in Vienna, he is observing the changes that Leipzig has undergone. But he has also changed. He is able to use his accumulated knowledge to discover new facets of his childhood Leipzig. The adult David is finding this new perspective on the past a very interesting experience.

His Leipziger roots manifest throughout David’s work. Knowing his family history and that of the city, we can understand David’s art on a more personal level. He grew up near the coal mines and his grandfather was employed within the industry. David childhood was informed by stories of the coal quarries and exposure to the landscape on a daily basis. He praises the aesthetic power of quarries. “It is like a hurricane” he says, describing the visual impact of the “moonlike landscape”.

David is a painter, who has also received professional training in photography. Thus, occasionally he utilises both disciplines in his practice. He found that photography alone was too clean as a medium and limiting in certain ways, whereas in painting David was able to integrate the momentum, the energy and the movement that is present throughout the creation. He also mentions that the lines and shapes on the paper trace artists’ morphology, adding an additional quality. Therefore, David uses large formats as they give more space for physical freedom and an opportunity to interact with the piece in a bodily manner.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Although his approach to painting is very expressive, David is very attentive to the detail and thoughtful about the materials he chooses. The choice of medium is tightly knitted to his birthplace and early exposures. David’s paintings have a very graphic aesthetic to them, he’s work channels the métier of contemporary drawing. He paints almost exclusively on paper using charcoal, ink and graphite, producing high contrast images.
He prefers to work on paper as it is less eternal than canvas, outlining the value of the present moment. The use of charcoal is self-explanatory, but is not by accident why he uses solely a specific brand of ink. David says to have a nostalgic connection with the ink from Rohrer & Klingner (a company established in Leipzig in.1907). This ink was the top choice in schools, used by children to learn writing.

He is also a gardener. His love for botany was ignited when he was assigned a tiny corner in the family garden. His corner plot grew bigger and bigger with each passing year. Now he can proudly speak about his collection of flowers, particularly his wild roses. As a gardener David is enchanted by the change of season, especially the springtime when nature comes back to life out of nothing. He is equally fascinated by the seeds and their ability to stay dormant for decades, just to be awakened by the right circumstances. Currently, whilst back in Leipzig, David is researching plants that are reappearing in Leipzig’s old quarries.
Within his art practice he integrates motifs of flowers, plays with their symbolism and creates harmonious Ikebanas. He is intrigued by Japanese zen gardens as well as tea rituals and Japanese ink painting.

David is a curious person and a multifaceted artist. David adores opera, he will be the one who is humming or whistling a fragment from a classical piece. Currently he is smitten by Shostakovich 11th symphony, but obviously being born in Leipzig he had the love for Bach placed in his cradle. David is interested in Bach’s’ approach to composing, his use of mathematical principles, Fibonacci sequence as well as numerology. David tries to apply these techniques himself, he studies principles of harmony, but is mesmerised by contrasts.
He is attracted by Vanitas and recognises both the beautiful and the ugly, We need both. David says: ”It is life, there is dirt and it is beautiful!”.

David manages to interweave various disciplines, techniques, personal history and symbols in a surprisingly harmonic and balanced way, creating art pieces that complement each other and form a complete oneness. Though one doesn’t have to recognize the information embedded to appreciate aesthetics of his work.



See his work at the following shows:

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Open:
Sat 16 / Sun 17
Thur 21 / Fri 22 / Sat 23
14:00 bis 18:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Travis D. Hendrix

Drawing is some sort of release for Travis. If he is stressed or off kilter, the process of using just a pen on the paper can reset his balance. That’s why he always carries at least one sketch book with him. Travis is a natural prodigy in drawing. The way he draws his lines confidently makes you think he is connected to an inspirational source, what he says assures this: “painting is like meditation for me.”

Travis was busy painting since he could hold a pencil. His mother has his art works documented since early childhood. While he has tried his hand at print making, sculpture, egg tempera and many other mediums, but he always comes back to drawing. He could easily say that art is his calling.

Travis made his profession academic, but after he made sure he had developed his own style and found confidence in it. “I was against the idea of going to an art academy for ages,” said Travis. He had seen many artists who had gone through academic art studies and that have had ruined their love of art and they started working in offices after that.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Architecture is a strong source of inspiration for Travis’ sketches, just as dreams are his muse for illustrating. He believes everything that happens to him during daily life gathers and assembles in dreams. This is where subconscious enters and makes a distinctive show. He places high value on dreams and wants to spend as much time exploring them as he can.

Mapping is another field that Travis is obsessed with. He explains, “Maps are from the very first means that human could use to understand and describe his surroundings.” Maps are like a common language for people, and Travis likes to communicate or transfer a feeling with his audience through his work.

Currently at PK, he is working on a series of maps from an unknown place. He believes maps can recall something in people from their historical memory hidden in their subconscious, especially when the map is produced from his subconscious and not necessarily from the reality outside. So with an art piece like that, people connect through a hidden chain and communicate on a Meta level.

Written by Elnaz Mostaan

images supplied by artist


To more of Travis’ work you can check his Facebook page, and of course you are welcome to the following exhibitions:

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Open:
Sat 16 / Sun 17
Thur 21 / Fri 22 / Sat 23
14:00 bis 18:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist spotlight: Matthias Geisler

“I consider myself an observer with alchemical tendencies”

Matthias Geisler has long been watching the versatility of the digital world with fascination. He works with the interaction between graphics and digital media. He wants to discover the archetypal surface that hides behind an image and make it visible. He selects and extracts the digital images that captivate him and transforms the incomprehensible as an abstract entity into intricate images or re-creates it as poetic impressions and figures.

Through the process of analyzing, modifying and deforming, the results are complex drawings in which subjective visions of reality are revealed. His daily experiences are condensed into the final outcome. He says, “The surfaces of the digital world raise in me the question of how order and chaos are determined.”

Sometimes he simulates the typical loop of digital space to repeatedly draw images with seemingly imperceptible differences. As in the serie called Krater: these are graphite drawings of images taken by NASA and ESA space probes. They are patterns with the different layers of repetition, structure and quality in which he examines the complexity of the space. Currently a source of inspiration are the pictures of the space by the German photographer Thomas Ruff in which he also reinterprets the digital images.

In addition to the spatial dimension, Matthias is fascinated by caves. Both are silent places that invite reflection on the meaning of existence. He draws his caves as mystical places. Starting from a figurative idea, he then follows their rhythm until he breaks away from reality. They are deliberate reminiscences of digital, electronically generated images. In the series of drawings Pause the cave reveals itself in the geometric and symmetric surfaces.

This work of research and transformation is associated with literal reflections. Each year he fills one notebook with interesting combinations of reasoned texts and drawings or quick sketches. Sometimes they are poetic compositions, ironic comics or long poems.

Matthias’s education started with the study of naturalistic design. He then he left it to find his own personal language closer to his interior world. When he draws, he starts with decorative lines or fluid forms. From abstract, figures and stories emerge.

He has a similar approach when creating his videos. From digital textures that form psychedelic and otherworldly environments, he tells stories of men who discover imaginary places and create human relationships. It is as if one of his drawings of an imaginative parallel world have come to life in his most recent short film.

Matthias says, “The digital is a non-place, a space without any dimension. Distance and time play no role, just like in the inner world, introspection or better said, the world of inner occupation. Man is still free in thought.”

The constant oscillation between understanding, searching as studying and creating is an expression of intent to discover mythical and mystical aspects of reality.

Written by Silvia Zandomeneghi


HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage: 
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM
performances by:
Darien Crossley
Adam Tuch
Tom Austin


open: 
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM 
location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9


Artist Spotlight: Louis Bouvier

Louis Bouvier has been steadily building a world all his own. Based in Montreal, he takes influence from traditional culture, the natural world and design elements. He, then, matches and layers form as well as aesthetic preference from different time periods in a collage based process to see what emerges. The end result is an anachronistic harmony, a harmony achieved not only by fitting the right forms and concepts together, but through technical execution. His graphite and colored pencil renderings shine in a muted texture, pulling the eye in and keeping it wandering within the frame of the paper. This pushing forward of ideas and connecting of seemingly disparate elements from nature and culture creates a sort of time capsule within his works and, ultimately, a search for a common thread.

This all comes from a curiosity about the human experience, how can we distill so much input, inspiration, and sensorial stimulation into something that makes sense? Does the human experience have to make sense? Bombardment of visual language, advertisements, and screen time is what influences Louis’ curiosity. We can bend genres of music just as we can mix and match visual cultures and differing aesthetics. It is this playfulness that keeps Louis exploring.

This exploration began while attending the University of Quebec in Montreal, where he received his master’s degree in visual arts and media. Louis found time inbetween silkscreen printing and drawing to experiment with plaster, thinking more about sculpture and installation and how they fit into his fine illustrative style. This focus on form mixed with the concept of layering inherent to screen printing became a perfect conceptual starting point for the way Louis’ work has developed throughout the years.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

While Louis struggles, at times, with juggling different styles and an impulse towards change, he fits visual elements into his pieces in a fixed way that beautifully encapsulates his philosophy on art making in general – let things flow in an open manner and see what gravitates together, then allow them to create their own meaning.

During his residency at Pilotenkueche he will be expanding his visual vocabulary by sourcing images and forms not only from photographs that he has taken, but from sculptures and installations that he creates. In this way he can both make more focused and nuanced connections between his work and the outside world but between the works themselves. This also allows him to open up the spaces in which his works are displayed – by mixing sculptural and installation elements with more traditional feeling works on paper he allows space for the viewer to not be guided by circumnavigating the space but to let the eye wander and allowing the mind and body to follow. In this self-described ‘research mode’ he will be finding new ways of producing while using the techniques he has so adeptly honed in new and challenging ways. There are surprises within Louis’ work, and he wants you to find them, one need only look – with a little bit of curiosity.

written by Adrian Klaus Rotzscher

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See Louis’s work in his solo exhibition:

Stepping out of the Echo Chamber

Vernissage 31 May 2019 8PM
Open: Wednesdays til 19 June
Location: Helmut, Kohlgartenstr 51, Leipzig

and in the following Pilotenkueche International Art Program shows: 

Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

Wrestling with Impermanence 

Vernissage: Fri 21 June 2019, 7PM
Open: Sat 22 – Wed 26 June 2019 1PM-5PM
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
Performance: To be announced

Artist Spotlight: Roman Bicek

“Change yourself.  You see the hypocrisy of trying to change another person.”  Roman prefers to draw attention to an issue, rather than make a statement that can be from an egotistical or self-centred position.  He works with humour and cynicism, not with a mission of political statement.  He likes to keep the viewer on edge, and draw attention to the materials of the object or image made.

By collecting images and text, he builds on layers of meaning.  There is a certain sense of immediacy in the way the work is put together, with his mark making reduced to the few strokes of the material he has chosen and with all the layers evident.  “I’m not gonna make more marks if I don’t think it necessary because my uncertainty would show if I don’t know what to do next”.  Every mark and image has purpose and is carefully considered or edited out, yet there is a sense of spontaneity and play with chance in the drawings and paintings Roman produces.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Punk and Alternative culture influenced his youth.  After years in Bratislava, his family moved to England where Roman spent his preteen years skateboarding and listening to the aggressive music of the 80s and 90s.  Having to take time learning English, he got into comics and illustrations.  Visual language started to gain importance, as his free expression through a new language was limited.  Both the influences and the need for expression kept a raw energy to what he put down.  He explains that with painting he wants to be true, to have it unrefined, and have the viewer sense and see the materials as they are.  

Not enough painters ask themselves why they paint or why they choose the medium.  Roman has witnessed waves of painters in the scene come and go, and recognises painting as a problematic material that needs to be challenged by the artist.  The notion of painting as a dead art form has been in conversation for years and as much as Roman sees the limitations of what he is doing, there is a pure necessity to continue doing it.  It has come to the point that art making is therapeutic in many ways, and if he doesn’t do it he feels a great urge to do it.  

Whether he exhibits or not, he continues to choose to struggle and compete with himself and the medium.  Not everything he makes will be exhibited or shown to the public, but the motivation to continue creating comes from a personal need to continue doing it.  He constantly keeps multiple works he develops at the same time, which helps convey the thought with more content.  He dissects images he comes across and thinks of ways to put them together that changes the connotations which may not be very rational at first but builds up to create new meanings.  He consistently challenges his own views and tests them through this on-going process.

Interacting with people he wouldn’t normally get a chance to, and seeing their motivations and passions play out in the open format studio setting of Pilotenkueche has been a humbling experience for him. Being exposed to other artists with different backgrounds, ideologies and experiences in the residency has enriched the quality of his time here in Leipzig. After the residency, Roman will be again immersed in having to work and continue his projects with artist run spaces and collectives he is involved with.  Hence, knowing his time will be precious, he relishes in the time to focus on himself and his work for the remaining weeks here.  

written by mihyun maria kim

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Unfinished Hase

15 Feb – 23 Feb 2019
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

Artist spotlight: José Sarmiento

Affection, tension and violence are the dramatic narratives in which José Sarmiento’s paintings capture the viewer. Just as in his work, so do in his life, extremes converge and coexist: in the works of this positive and calm but ambitious person every hint of tranquility disappears.

Being a painter was not an aware decision. Our Colombian artist is drawn to painting and its communication abilities: a communication cut-off from the verbal.

“You don’t think with words, but through painting. It is another way of thinking, deepest; based on the materials and the body”.

According to Sarmiento, there is a space between what you expect to do, and how you redirect it into action, over which you have no control. “Between these two phases there is a huge space, that of direction and loss”. In this way, there is a meeting of the conscious with the unconscious.

all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Between passion and calmness, the constant in José is creativity. Being a confluence of diverse facets and states himself, his artistic work is the result of the infinite artistic concerns that nourish his vision. Within his painting he brings an insightful and intelligent perspective, suggestive connections between literature and cinema, and a contagious enthusiasm that leads him to declare “how chévere art is”. His painting is a clash of all disciplines he loves: he thinks of his projects as a narrative. He takes a moment of an event and expresses it in the purest Baroque style.

There is a strong presence of homosexuality. His works show two bodies longing for devouring oneself affectionately. It exposes the blurred boundaries of the body during sex, showing the animal part of the male body. In its outline there is room for biographical and fantastic. The fantasy of homosexuality, due its historical existence as something forbidden and hidden, José sees as something magical.

The rise to imagination is given. Before and after is the receptor’s choice. To get to this point, he recollects images firstly. He chooses the materials that best fit and starts working on it, with pastel colors and transparency paper being his favorites. His artistic process is based on contemplation, thinking, and subsequent execution. Even so, he is inspired by rapid processes; José does not give opportunity to boredom.

In Cain, Abel, one of his exhibitions, he was showing a confrontation of opposites: works of different resources in perfect connection. In it, he set up a discourse based on differences. Something like the artist’s own metaphor.

One of his greatest inspirations is the German choreographer Pina Bausch, one of the pioneers of dance theater. The idea of ​​repetition and liberation of the movement seduced José. But above all, the philosophy that Bausch safeguards: the constancy that leads to ease. That hypothetical spontaneity of the dance, in the words of Sarmiento, is due to the continuous repetition and its poetic truth.

He was dazzled by Germany’s pictorial history, both expressionism and contemporary painting. From Leipzig and Pilotenkueche he hopes to learn from everybody in the residency and to be nourished by the external artistic process. From himself José expects to generate empathy with the public and transmit his inner message through that particular communication: painting.

Written by María Valcárcel

Come and see Jose’s works in the following shows:

Unfinished Hase

Open:  16 – 23.02.19, 13 – 17h
Finissage: 23.02.19 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany

Fast Kotzen 

Vernissage:  23.03.19, 19h
Open:  24 – 27.03.19 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany

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En José Sarmiento conversan y conviven los extremos: la persona, positiva y tranquila pero ambiciosa, quiebra en una quieta armonía la obra, donde todo atisbo de tranquilidad desaparece. La narración drámatica en su pintura capta al espectador a través del afecto, la tensión y la violencia.  

Ser pintor no fue una decisión consciente; simplemente empezó a hacerlo y se convirtió en su medio predilecto de expresión. Nuestro artista colombiano se siente atraído por la pintura y sus capacidades comunicativas: una comunicación alejada de lo verbal. “No piensas con las palabras, piensas a través de la pintura, es otra forma de pensamiento más profunda; a partir de los materiales y del cuerpo”. Según Sarmiento, hay un espacio entre lo que esperas hacer (las expectativas), y en cómo las rediriges al movimiento, sobre el que no tienes control. “Entre estas dos fases hay un espacio enorme, el de dirección y pérdida”. De esta forma, hay un encuentro de lo consciente con lo inconsciente.

Entre la pasión y la calma, la constante en José es la creatividad. Siendo él mismo la confluencia de diversas facetas y estados, su obra artística es el resultado de las infinitas inquietudes artísticas que nutren su visión. Con su pintura aporta una mirada perspicaz e inteligencia, sugestivas conexiones entre literatura, cine y pintura, y un contagioso entusiasmo que le lleva a declarar “lo chévere que es el arte”. Su pintura es el choque de todas las disciplinas que ama: piensa en sus proyectos como una narración, coge un momento, un encuentro y lo plasma al más puro estilo barroco. Hay una fuerte presencia de la sexualidad y la homosexualidad. Por lo general muestra dos cuerpos donde hay un anhelo por devorarse afectivamente. Muestra los límites difuminados del cuerpo durante el sexo, mostrando la parte animal del cuerpo masculino. En su trazo hay cabida para lo biográfico y lo fantástico. La fantasía de la homosexualidad,  por su histórica relación con lo prohibido, lo oculto, para él volcado en la magia.

Mientras los espectadores salivan por conocer el final de la historia, José toma un único extracto de su narración interna para dar pie a la imaginación. El antes y el después es a elección del consumidor. Para llegar a este punto, recolecta imágenes. A partir de ellas escoge los materiales que mejor se ajusten y empieza a trabajar sobre ello, siendo los colores pasteles y el papel de transparencia sus favoritos. Su proceso artístico se basa en la contemplación, en el pensamiento, y posterior ejecución.  Aún así, le inspiran los procesos rápidos; José no da oportunidad al aburrimiento.

Caín, Abel, fue una de sus 4 solo exhibition. Ésta fue la confrontación de los opuestos: obras de diferentes recursos en perfecta conexión. En ella, configuró un discurso a partir de la diferencia. Algo así como la propia metáfora del artista.

Una de sus mayores inspiraciones es la alemana Pina Bauch, una de las pioneras de la danza teatro. La idea de repetición y liberación del movimiento sedujo a José. Pero sobre todo, la filosofía que salvaguarda Bauch: la constancia que lleva a la soltura. Esa hipotética espontaneidad de la danza, en palabras de Sarmiento, se debe a la continua repetición y a su verdad poética.

De Alemania le encandiló su historia pictórica, tanto el expresionismo como los pintores contemporáneos. De Leipzig y de Pilotenkueche espera aprender de las personas que residen con él, tener otras perspectivas y nutrirse del proceso artístico externo. De sí mismo, busca generar empatía con el público y transmitir su mensaje interior a partir de esa comunicación tan particular: la pintura.

Written by María Valcárcel

This was the 37th round

Last week we said goodbye to 2018 and, with it, our most recent residents. We will remember the ideas and collaborative spontaneity that filled the studio, but most of all their ability to play in life and through their art. We were able to bond through our collective experiences. Between our four exhibitions, our program days included day trips to Bauhaus and Halle. We saw Leipzig from many perspectives, talked to exhibiting artists, gallery owners, curators and project spaces. We toured the west with architects, went to museums and even to the Christmas market.

We danced, we laughed, but most of all: we created.

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

ReView: SPOOR

SPOOR /spʊə,spɔː/

noun
1. the track or scent of an animal.
verb
1. follow the track or scent of (an animal or person).

The aim of the final exhibition resulting from 37th round of the Pilotenkueche International Art Program is to raise the issue of being-in-the-world, bringing forth the notion of perception. It is “the background from which all acts stand out, and is presupposed by them”. We do not perceive isolated sense-impressions because we only see things as they relate. Our mental representations are formed by our previous experiences and future expectations. Art can capture the affective primordial contact that tends to go unnoticed. Artists are embedded and immersed in the tangible day to day world and assume a life of their own, opening themselves to metaphoric meanings by responding with forms, shapes, and colours.

Contemporary artistic process is not only about understanding technical formalities and introducing them in the art practice, but about the production of strangeness. Thus, contemporary art does not refer to a single determining judgment. In principle, the artistic process is not governed by rules and pre-established categories: these are what the artist seeks to discover and establish in their work. Contemporary art embraces sensibility – the artworks aim to capture the displacement of subjectivity through experiments and propositions that operate as a circuit breaker of the perception. It is a deflection of what is known.

all images by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

This plurality is present during the selection of artists for the program. The choices are based on the quality of their works, not in an a priori theme for each round. This means the relationships outlined between their poetics are subsequent and follow the uniqueness of the pieces produced during the residency. After three months, it is clear that all artists have sought to trace relationships with the city: its characteristics and found artefacts, each of them making their own way. 

text by curator Viviane Tabach


For the vernissage of SPOOR, Pilotenkueche was happy to host three musical performances. Violinist Izabela Kaldunska, originally from Poland,  played excerpts from her experimental work “The New Solarism”, along with some freshly created compositions. Classically trained as a pianist Elif Murat, originally from Ankara, Turkey, also presented some of her new electronic chill out pieces ‘Ellie M.’. Then the pair joined to perform as Ichor, a  collaborative project in which they compose electronic dance music. Just like the artists on the residency, Izabela and Elif  met in Leipzig.


SPOOR
14-19 Dec 2018

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty

AHS speech bubble PK

Re-View: Rutschbahn and Speech Bubble

Marking the half way point of the artists’ time at Pilotenkueche art residency, Rutschbahn, the second exhibition of Pilotenkueche round 37, opened on Friday, the 16th of November 2018 at Krudebude.  Krudebude is an unusual exhibition space set in a “Wächterhaus” – a very Leipzig concept which provides apartments and other project spaces for inexpensive rent –. This made for a intimate and friendly atmosphere throughout the evening .

The 10 participating artists were encouraged to collaborate and make use of the space and its peculiar characteristics. This was particularly visible with Buket Savci’s work Hole of Mystical Desire, which was placed in direct relation with the remains of flowered wallpaper on one of the doors;  Jan Yongdeok Lim’s installation Smoke, which appropriated the coal burning stove in one of the rooms, and Reinhold Ponesch’s RIDE MY HORNS, placed just above one of the door frames in the entrance hall in reference to the traditional placement of mounted horns.

A great number of guests arrived as soon as the clock hit 7pm, and just an hour later, everyone gathered in one of the rooms to watch Reinhold Ponesch and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s collaborative performance IT CONCERNS YOU. This was Reinhold Ponesch’s and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s first experience with performance art. It was engaging to see how fiercely emotions were portrayed by the two artists. The audience was also positively taken by surprise when encouraged to participate.

We welcomed some familiar faces, previously spotted at the artists’ first exhibitionI Accept the Cookies – who were enthusiastic to see the development of the artists’ practice from  its first work-in-progress sneak peak. New faces kept on arriving until late in the evening, and the same was visible at the finissage last Thursday, 22 November 2018. Ann-Kathrin – one of the organizers of Krudebude – was positively amazed by the show, claiming it was one of the best so far at the space, both in quality and attendance.

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

Just a week later, on Friday, 23 November 2018, the third exhibition of the 37th round of Pilotenkueche – Speech Bubble – opened its doors. This was the first exhibition showcasing all 14 artists, marking local artist Georg Lisek’s first exhibition of the round with the display of Mask Variation, one of the two video works that could be seen in the show.

The evening began with a welcome speech by Barbara Röhner, owner of Alte Handelsschule and organizer of its exhibition space, followed by words from curator Viviane Tabach. For the curator, this show marks a turning point in the artists’ creative journey at the residency, where they can naturally invent their spaces within the large floor areas of the space, as well as its high ceilings. The artists finally have the freedom to exhibit some of the larger works that have been behind the studio walls, anxiously awaiting their moment. There was also space to develop site-specific work, as Luca Arboccò so rightly did. 

Before reaching the second floor where the exhibition takes place, visitors were surprised by flashing colours on their right as they walked up the stairs. As they followed this intriguing set of blue and purple lights, they found the first piece from the exhibition, No Broken Mirrors Shift Between Our Glance, by Nicholas Adamson. At first just a broken chair carefully laid on the floor, once the visitors moved closer and engaged in the space, they could see a mirror below the chair, reflecting an oil painting of a clown.

 

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

As the visitors continued up the stairs, they were intoxicated by the sound of Izabela Kałduńska’s music performance “The New Solarism” as they entered the exhibition space. Sitting in harmony amid Finn Curry and David Benarroch’s sculptures, the audience was treated to an hour long experimental performance that shifted between loops of classical violin arrangements and other sounds such as tearing paper, taps on wood and voice. 

Some visitors were noticed exploring the processes of Jan Yongdeok Lim’s Draainweg series through touch, which was interestingly unusual; others were intrigued by Barry Amey’s pieces and their reflection of colour on the wall, and curiously placed their hands behind the pieces to sense their heat – or as they then discovered, the lack of it – in an attempt to explore if they conveyed any light. For many guests, the most striking pieces were Julia Eichler’s Borderwallprototype I and II, for their materiality and playfulness; discovering they are relatively light, considering appearing heavy.

As the evening progressed, the guests grew comfortable – some sat in each corner of the room discussing the different works on view, and others laid on the floor next to Ai Ikeda’s piece Reassembling Matters, almost blending in with the ropes, kraft and waste papers.

These were two nights to remember and we cannot wait to meet again at the most awaited of all exhibitions –  the final one.

SPOOR
Friday, 14 December 2018
at the PK studio space.


Last chance to see Speech Bubble:
finissage Friday 30 Dec from 7PM.


Rutschbahn

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)

Local Artist:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Speech Bubble

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)

Curator:
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants:
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

speech bubble photo ines

In progress: Speech Bubble

Artistic endeavour can develop in a number of ways. However, it often follows a certain pattern. In the beginning one doodles and experiments with materials. Acutely aware of their surroundings, one must be open to experience in order to be inspired. There comes a point where there is something to say. This motivates the artist to use techniques old and new to create.

The artists of the 37th round are ready to talk! Speech Bubble opens Friday 23 Nov at the Alte Handelsschule. The voices of 14 artists join to create a chorus without losing their individuality. The large scale of the shabby chic auditorium has enabled the artists to work larger and the result is breathtaking. There are just a few final touches to make before it’s perfect for you.

all photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

We are pleased to announce that violinist Izabela Kałduńska will perform THE NEW SOLARISM at the vernissage. Although classically trained, in her new solo project she experiments with her instrument to find new ways of creating what she calls “dreamscapes.” Supported by a loop station, she will explore the tension between romance and darkness. 


SPEECH BUBBLE
PK @ Alte Handelsschule

facebook event

Vernissage: Fri 23 Nov 2018 7PM
Performance: Fri 23 Nov 2018 8PM
THE NEW SOLARISM by Izabela Kałduńska (Gdańsk, Poland)
violin, loop station

Open: Sat 24 Nov – Thur 29 Nov 1PM – 5PM
Finissage: Fri 30 Nov 7PM

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty

PK coordinator
maeshelle west-davies