Monthly Archives: September 2019

GRATEFUL PARK: PK RD40 final show

How do we navigate and develop our own ecologies of care? We are currently faced with economic models that devalue and obstruct care; producing subjectivities that drive the current climate crisis and the on-going disruption/destruction of ecosystems, displacing both humans and other-than humans. With blatant disregard for the embodied knowledge these ecosystems cultivate and nourish.

This final exhibition of the 40th round of PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program residents aims to be a space to rethink forms of operating in the individual and collective spheres. Grateful Park reflects the outcome of some of these processes, articulating how we find ourselves embedded in an environment.

Through a cultural and affective exchange that creates systems to nurture, support one another and grow, the studios at PILOTENKUECHE build a shared ecology. This ecology lives in-between, influenced by the social and environmental, therefore catalysing possibilities to recalibrate our idea of individual and collective care practices.

Support structures can reflect how care labour is undervalued
under capitalism
. As artists, we might bring visibility to invisible acts of care and also how we might approach care as something creative, as a way of reinventing its place or value in work/ life/ art relations. Perhaps we open up questions around how care is done and who does it. The diversity of the works in the show Grateful Park is testimony to the myriad of questions we are faced with in our current political and environmental crisis. The residents create and inhabit new constellations.

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage:
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM

performances:
Tom Austin
Adam Tuch
LIS

open:
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM

location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9
04179 Leipzig


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)–

Artist Spotlight: Vernon O´Meally


The New York based artist Vernon O’Meally has always tried to express himself through art in an abstract way. At the tender young age of 7, Vernon started trying to represent his universe through the medium of paint, . At first, his works were photorealistic, then abstract. Now, they oscillate between figurative and organic forms. However, his abstract visual representations will not remain his only philosopher’s stone until he crosses the road of rock music. 

Psychedelic art, the turning point for Vernon. 


“I started to get into psychedelic rock-n-roll…, I have been inspired by the journey to that music


Music has a great impact on the development of Vernon’s practice, and is an integral part of his artistic journey. He expresses himself through the combination of music and painting. Since he became interested in psychedelic rock music, his practice has largely been shaped by it. He feels that only music can truly make you feel like you are on a voyage. Vernon is fascinated by psychedelia in general, and in particular the artistic and philosophical ideas that are associated with it. Throughout his psychedelic journey, he has been curating albums of Rock‘n’Roll music of the 60’s and 70’s, which he listens to whilst creating new work.


Working with different representational means throughout his time at PILOTENKUECHE, Vernon has been exploring unlimited possibilities from hallucinatory illusion-making to comic representation in his studio practice. Currently, he primarily layers graphic elements and mixes them with figurative images taken from popular culture. There is a recurrence of rainbows, cartoons, geometric shapes and the metamorphoses of forms. Characteristic for his practice is the constant impulse to experiment and to reinvent.

The impressive torrent of visual effects of Vernon’s studio paintings shows his rich artistic vision.

Impactful, loud colour combinations and bold lines create a feeling of immediate accessibility. They let the audience dive into the artist’s artistic universe, and create a spectrum of sensations that can be felt in the presence of his paintings. Back in New York, Vernon has worked on several commissions: he has been creating designs for cars, walls, buildings and also private spaces. 

Now, Vernon is at a turning point in his career. He is more and more interested in studying cartoon characters. Recently, he integrated the ghost character “Minnie the Moocher” into one of his paintings. Vernon describes his experience here as rewarding and equally profound.

Vernon is a fabulous painter, he constantly creates visual images that invite us to push our thinking beyond our limits. In his studio, he has developed inspiring and pervasive images.

written by Stanley Louis


HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage:
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM

performances:
19.30-20.00
Tom Austin
20.15- 21.45
Adam Tuch
21.00-22.00
LIS 
(Simon Schafer, Lasha White and Izabella Kaldunska)
https://soundcloud.com/lis_leipzig/sets/amok-2019…

vernissage: 
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM
performances by:
Darien Crossley
Adam Tuch
Tom Austin


open: 
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM 
location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9


Artist Spotlight: Simon Schäfer

Humanity is over!

It may be fun for some of us, but it’s still scary, and in addition, it is true that the extinction of the Holocene is happening now. No one can ignore that human activity in recent decades is responsible for such crime. This is what Simon Schäfer, the German based artist, tells us in his studio.

It is clear, the extinction of each species potentially leads to the extinction of other species related to this species in a complex ecological network, but human behavior and current policies do not worry about this dark and meaningless future. We need a new way of thinking and acting. As an artist, I am deeply concerned with those issues, although I feel that we are about to dive more and more, we are straight to disaster! 

After a difficult period of depression, Simon decided to leave his couch, turn off the tv and to start asking the thorny question of the future of art within this miserly and unscrupulous society. How can art help us to abolish the lack of humanity and the multiplication of men’s vices?

Having been studying and living in London, “recuperation” is at the heart of Simon’s practice and very much evident in the media he uses to express himself. He collects old phones, cables, radios and other electronic materials, transforming and altering the ready made.

Simon express his art in different mediums. He started with sculpture before he turned to music. He developed a relationship with some instruments that he played like drums and guitar back in 2001.

Simon’s technique  involves electronics, it is his particular modus operandi.

Simon opens up electronic instruments and poke around the board to see what happens and try to get what we do not usually get. This practice has become his principal one for over 18 years. He creates sounds through circuit bending. One of his musical devices is an old landline phone through which we can hear sounds similar to a multi effect guitar. Simon loops the noises and creates musical pieces. The viewer feels the energy and vibration experienced by the artist. It is a sound that is able to awaken the human conscience.


Dazzled by the possibilities offered by this technique with electronic devices, Simon tries to transform old object into something new, giving them a second life, and almost letting us forget their previous purpose. He endows them with a soul and an astonishing power. It is the emptiness of humanity that he tries to fill from every piece, every sculpture and every performance.


An artist cannot take away from reality!


While it is clear that the art market continues to have the wind in its sails, the artist, meanwhile, thinks it is a sad reality. The art world has become too linear, it is only a market for capital investment!  A sad reality!

Simon claims that he doesn’t need that business market value. What is important today, according to him, is human dignity. I want the other feeling! What do I see as an artist? What do I do, why do I do it? The most important thing an artist is supposed to give a small push to think differently.

written by Stanley Louis


HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage:
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM

performances:
19.30-20.00
Tom Austin
20.15- 21.45
Adam Tuch
21.00-22.00
LIS 
(Simon Schafer, Lasha White and Izabella Kaldunska)
https://soundcloud.com/lis_leipzig/sets/amok-2019…

vernissage: 
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM
performances by:
Darien Crossley
Adam Tuch
Tom Austin


open: 
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM 
location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9

Artist Spotlight: Ariel Taylor

Realistic and magical, the illustration of Ariel tells the stories of modern fairy-tale. As a little girl, she was lured by the landscape and fantasy of Hayao Miyazaki’s animation “Spirited Away.” She has always admired the charming forests and landscape of her hometown Athens, Ohio. With the desire of creating stories to draw people into nature and to remind us that there’s still magic, she set herself on the quest of story-telling as a print-maker.

Unfortunately, Her beloved land Ohio was then destroyed by fracking. The concern for the environment brought her to her first big project which she wrote a fairy-tale of a heroine fighting against the evil force that is wiping out the forest. “I realised through illustrating, I can tell it in a way that is not as confrontational as other forms, like activism. I did protest, but I feel that when you show it less ‘in-your-face,’ people are more willing to accept it.”

Magic and fantasy are in her blood. Last year, she went on a genealogy trip to Scotland – the land of mythical legends and medieval tales, of burning witches and Arthur’s Seat. She found out her family is related to Robert the Bruce, the King of Scotland during early 14th century, who famously fought in the First War of Scottish Independence. This journey of ancestral discovery, with her fondness of the animation “The Secret of Bells” resulted in a series of illustration with Celtic ambient.

Her latest work at the residency was inspired by her recent trip to Southeast Asia, including three paintings and a linocut print and embroidery textile piece. She gradually shifts print-making to painting for its accessibility being on the road. The paintings, titled in “The Discovery,” “The Danger” and “The Explorer,” present a Thai Arch, a tiger and a young lady, respectively. The feature of the young lady was borrowed from the figure of one of the Joan of Arc statues. She explained that Angkor Wat was said to be explored by a French naturalist who stumbled onto the land. However, the story-told is a Christopher Columbus sort which shows the discovery of European invaders rather than the portrayal of what had been happening already long before the intrusion. “I would like the culture which actually made the effort to create this thing to be given credit.”

The discovery comes along with the damage of relics and ecology. She talked of the missing reliefs, such as the head of a Garuda that was chiseled off in order to be sold in the black markets. During her trip, she was not able to visit Maya Bay in Thailand – made famous by 2000 film “The Beach” – as the officials decided to close it until 2021 for ecology recovery from severe environment destruction by tourism. Just like the early fairy tales of Hans Christian Anderson and The Grimm Brothers, there are dark elements in her magical stories. In her modern fairy-tales lies the timeless question of all fantasy: What does it cost to get the prince? What do you sacrifice to realize the dream?

Written by Huai-ya Lin



HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage: 
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM
performances by:
Darien Crossley
Adam Tuch
Tom Austin


open: 
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM 
location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9

Artist spotlight: Matthias Geisler

“I consider myself an observer with alchemical tendencies”

Matthias Geisler has long been watching the versatility of the digital world with fascination. He works with the interaction between graphics and digital media. He wants to discover the archetypal surface that hides behind an image and make it visible. He selects and extracts the digital images that captivate him and transforms the incomprehensible as an abstract entity into intricate images or re-creates it as poetic impressions and figures.

Through the process of analyzing, modifying and deforming, the results are complex drawings in which subjective visions of reality are revealed. His daily experiences are condensed into the final outcome. He says, “The surfaces of the digital world raise in me the question of how order and chaos are determined.”

Sometimes he simulates the typical loop of digital space to repeatedly draw images with seemingly imperceptible differences. As in the serie called Krater: these are graphite drawings of images taken by NASA and ESA space probes. They are patterns with the different layers of repetition, structure and quality in which he examines the complexity of the space. Currently a source of inspiration are the pictures of the space by the German photographer Thomas Ruff in which he also reinterprets the digital images.

In addition to the spatial dimension, Matthias is fascinated by caves. Both are silent places that invite reflection on the meaning of existence. He draws his caves as mystical places. Starting from a figurative idea, he then follows their rhythm until he breaks away from reality. They are deliberate reminiscences of digital, electronically generated images. In the series of drawings Pause the cave reveals itself in the geometric and symmetric surfaces.

This work of research and transformation is associated with literal reflections. Each year he fills one notebook with interesting combinations of reasoned texts and drawings or quick sketches. Sometimes they are poetic compositions, ironic comics or long poems.

Matthias’s education started with the study of naturalistic design. He then he left it to find his own personal language closer to his interior world. When he draws, he starts with decorative lines or fluid forms. From abstract, figures and stories emerge.

He has a similar approach when creating his videos. From digital textures that form psychedelic and otherworldly environments, he tells stories of men who discover imaginary places and create human relationships. It is as if one of his drawings of an imaginative parallel world have come to life in his most recent short film.

Matthias says, “The digital is a non-place, a space without any dimension. Distance and time play no role, just like in the inner world, introspection or better said, the world of inner occupation. Man is still free in thought.”

The constant oscillation between understanding, searching as studying and creating is an expression of intent to discover mythical and mystical aspects of reality.

Written by Silvia Zandomeneghi


HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage: 
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM
performances by:
Darien Crossley
Adam Tuch
Tom Austin


open: 
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM 
location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9


Hungry Dungeon Friends

There are some conversations that can only take place on the borders of ourselves; in contact with the other. The exhibition, Hungry Dungeon Friends, circulates around these borders and interiorities. They are viscous, unformed, multiple and representative of our hybrid nature.  

Through the hybrid format of the PILOTENKUECHE  International Art Program, there are possibilities to realign ones practice and be exposed to new environments, like the dungeonesque basement at KKW which offers a unique stimuli. Exchanges can be marked by a need, a hunger communicated through the affective fields of our bodies.  The body-organism is linked to the world through a network of primal signifiers, our bodies’ raw data

Like in the Deffractionist writings of philosopher, Karen Barad, in this project the pollination between practices and processes of the artists seeks to frame how “we cut together apart.”  The work explores intimacies and edges of collapse, dialogues about method, stages of unconscious and conscious action. How and what inhabits these points of exchange? PILOTENKUECHE offers a space to challenge temporal and spatial constraints.

In an enhanced awareness of these possible exchanges we question and reconfigure understandings. Hungry Dungeon Friends seeks to look into our entanglements in a myriad of ways. Conceived in an underworld of currents, it is a form and place where thinking intervenes in the more than human worlds.

Theorist Donna Haraway’s work highlights the figuration of these broken boundaries and imploded worlds, where knowledge and ontology dissolve. As a species we need to collectively reimagine new forms of empathy and understanding. In turn, this allows the developing of methods of care and extends the notion of what relating is, in order to confront humanity’s 21st century human exceptionalism. 

written by Curator in Residence Colette Patterson


Hungry Dungeon Friends

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

Live performances by 
sound artist Isaac Magner with film maker Agathe Barreand performance artists Antonia Wetzel, Tom Alexander Austin and Simon Schäfer.

events:
Saturday 24 August
Curatorial Tour by Colette Patterson

Live performance by 
Tom Alexander Austin

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM Tue-Sun

location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str.


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)– 

Artist Spotlight: Darien Crossley

Drawing is like therapy for Darien Crossley. She expresses herself through pen and ink. With her meticulous technique she patiently draws dense lines. She gives shape to outlandish figures with abstract features. They are mainly feminine, and Darien focuses on their distorted features: sometimes they are not fully formed, they lack bodyparts or have too many. Bodyparts separate or unite. Bodies that stretch and expand.

“I focus on the emotions I feel, on the physical presence in my body and I try to express them”.

Drawing is a meditative practice. The viewer can feel this introspective aspect, equally identifying themselves with the illustration and making them their own. Everyone has a dark side, and as Darien says, “I hope the spectators can benefit from my drawings and understand that they are not alone”.

Her drawings have the simplicity and lightness of cartoons, but mysterious at the same time. The darkness appears in her dreams. Sometimes her subconscious is expressed in the most absurd ways, and this is another source of inspiration for her stories. Initially she was keeping an illustrated dream journal. Later she experimented with other media.

After using watercolors she returned to black and white for her latest work called ‘Good Spirits’.Darien is fascinated by the idea of the presence of ancient spirits around us. Good spirits that make our existence on earth magical and more interesting. She is of the opinion that although we do not know how to interact with spirtis, they must be respected.

To find a better understanding of Darien’s work we might need to look at the contemporary Japanese performance Butoh. Darien explains, “Living in Asheville, a little town in North Carolina which is a quite conservative state, I learned that there are very few Butoh instructors in America. And one was teaching in a studio two doors over from were I was working!”

Thanks to the coincidence, Darien’s art work closely connects with the Japanese culture. The restlessness, the strangeness, the focus on the naked bodies can all be found in this mixture of dance, theatre and improvisation. Like Butoh her art work can be defined in many ways: physical, spiritual, cathartic, liberating.

Currently at Pilotenkuche, Darien is working on a sort of personal diary, similar to comics. In one of her drawings deals with the feeling of being outside of a social group and suddently sinking into a thousand layers. There is always the balance between comic and darkness, almost oscillating between the two sides of the being. How will it be interpreted by observers? Which side of theor existence will it emphasise?

It is a continuous investigation of herself and her body. Darien is also a tattoo artist and her figures are engraved on her skin as a clear symbol of identification. But there is another unexpected side to Darien. she also works as a songwriter. She plays different instruments and accompanies them with a delicate voice. Melancholy is likely to be read through the lyrics and the notes of her electronic folk music. She will be performing at the Grateful Park vernissage on 20 September.

written by Silvia Zandomeneghi

https://soundcloud.com/nightmarketofspirits/golden-hammer

HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage: 
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM
performances by:
Darien Crossley
Adam Tuch
Tom Austin


open: 
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM 
location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9