Category Archives: artists

Artist Spotlight: Nora Manthei

Nora believes there are two kind of artists. There are the ones whom always knew they wanted to be an artist and the ones who had experiences which gradually revealed an artistic pathway. Her mother is an art teacher so she had a mix of the two above. She was always looking at coffee table books of important artists and wanted to become a painter because it was easy for her to understand what a painter does. Slowly she understood that for her there was more to working in art. It could be a form of language.

After finishing high school, she had the idea that one should already be a big artist. Obviously that was not the case, so then she supported this idea by studying art history in Leipzig. This too was not highly satisfying either so she started studying in Weimar Bauhaus University in the field of art. This was much closer to what she was seeking as she had the mind space to concentrate on her projects regarding the city and the lessons.

After Weimar, she continued studying in Halle, and from there she did an Erasmus exchange in Vienna. This was a turning point for me,” Nora says. Up to this point she was working with every type of materials and the centre of the works were all political subjects and always about moral issues. Vienna helped her to stop packing her idea and giving it to people to unpack it.  She started telling stories and writing down. She decided that she didn’t want to work with the topics that are chosen, rather the things that she had experienced herself.

The matters that you are confronted with in daily routine is Nora’s focus. She prefers to work with topics that are familiar to viewers so there is a common theme to connect with. She doesn’t think it is reasonable to make art for a small group of people who are highly educated and reference it in a way that is not readable for everyone.

Nora has her studio in an old factory. It’s a shared art space in the east of Leipzig. It’s like a collective but everyone works independently. It is the conversations, events and shared space that makes it feel like a collective.

At the moment she is working a lot with texts and typography. She has made several books. However sometimes she goes back to conceptual work like the works she displayed in the first show of the PK RD41, including writing sentences and crossing them out again.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

In addition, she does lots of photography. “Most probably every photographer experiences that moment when she blames herself for not carrying the camera with herself and loses a great shot, but when you are working with text, you have your mind always with you, You just need a pen and a piece of paper,” Nora says. Nora believes you shouldn’t put your emphasis on working with a certain media. You have to stay open to change.

“it is the most important thing for an artist not to keep repeating herself just because it’s going well and selling well.”

Artist Statement: Doubting and transforming is my process. My way of working is constantly complemented by various techniques and media, which are based on the content and emerging of piece. Since 2017 I have been working mostly with text and its interaction with pictures. These works are beginnings or fragments that can be described as a kind of everyday archeology. Out of overcoming distance and immersion into a matter, an alienation irrevocably follows. The constant back and forth is essential to be able to look from the self to the subject. For me, a work of art really only exists when it has entered the world of images of the beholder. Art is for me a connecting and supportive element to make the complexity of the present tangible. Art challenges, questions and does not give in.


written by Elnaz Mostaan

you can look at Nora’s website for more of her work

And come see her work in the following show

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

Artist Spotlight: Wim Warrink

Wim does not call himself an artist. He believes that it is a title to be earned and it is a lifelong objective. Wim’s stance is that one should think for oneself, doing things just for the sake of it. Even if it is bad or stupid, if it makes you happy, do it. It is never about success. Afterall success is something other people project on you.

It is safe to say that this Dutch artist is a doer, not a talker. You won’t find him elaborating and building skyscraper concepts just to tick industry boxes or please someone.
This doesn’t mean that his work is without conceptual depth. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. Wim presents a clear message and gives a distinctive direction on how to interpret it, without tautologies. He delivers – a concept and excellent craftsmanship, showcasing his engineering skills and technical knowledge. If you don’t see it, move on.

Wim’s path to the art was not without detours. He studied and worked as an electrician. Feeling unfulfilled, he took a career advisory test that suggested he should follow a creative path or work with animals. This lead Wim to start studying industrial design. He put in rigorous work, but yet again he didn’t feel comfortable in a field that fuels mass production and unreasonable consumption.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

It was at S.M.A.K museum in Ghent that he was first exposed to Arte Povera. The art of Bernd Lohaus and Giovanni Anselmo struck him. He sat in front of Bernd’s Lohaus piece for a good half an hour, taking in impressions, breathing in the material. The realisation came that Art is what Wim wants to do. The impression was such a powerful one that his entrance essay for the Academy of Arts was about Giovanni Anselmo and Wim’s graduation work displays strong influences of his work. .

Wim Warrink’s work has a certain rawness and tension to it. Like Don Quixote, Wim is engaged in a constant battle. His machines embody power, movement, direction and time. This artist has a comfortable relationship with time. He accepts it for what it is. He resists the need for instantaneity. He slowly appreciates the moment, though also understands that good things do not come tout de suite. Wim stresses the importance of taking breaks to enjoy life – they are crucial to break up a jammed thought process, find the last piece of a puzzle or to be inspired.

His work does reference time a lot, but without trying to grasp the concept of infinity. When engineering Wim only integrates found parts, from streets and flea markets. The machinery is a fusion of spare parts with each piece having a unique backstory. His engines are thought through and a result of plenty hours of laborious work and history, but made to do what Wim wants them to do – here and now. At the end of the day it does make sense:  Machines doing things for you – equals more time to do things you love, be creative.

Currently this artist has embarked on a year-long nomadic journey, in which he will be participating in different art residencies around Europe. We are happy to know that PK is his first stop and Wim is inspired by Leipzig and its industrial and coal mining industry scenes. PK wishes Wim the best of luck and a lot of joyful experiences in the near future.

written by Agnes

Wim Warrink’s website and Instagram.


Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artists Spotlight: Andrius Ivanovas

“mgmn (brand-pseudonym) has a broader soul than “Tik-Tok’s” servers. He admires Joji, social events that usually don’t fit into arrangements. mgmn is excited by “sadgasm”, “banshee”, “this cat is chonky” facebook’s groups, Playboi carti, lil Uzi Vert music, likes “Pusheen” kitten and would like to see rapper Tay-k from Tarrant jail released because mgmn loves the machine guns on western shopping carts in Muslim countries. Kuwait’s fields of burning oil are still more impressive than the speeches of climate change protesters, virtual pokemon characters created to be much more cute than any human being near, events that create emptiness faster than fill it, which are charming as much as can give sincere joy and allow life to manifest. mgmn loves these times,” written by Andrius.

Andrius is the one behind “Mega man”, which is an unofficial brand for life style. How it offers lifestyle is not by producing clothes and accessories, but instead it forms people’s lifestyle by thematizing questions. Megaman is not a normal person, he is a thing you can hide your personality behind, and feel safe with it.

The phrase “mega man” has long been in existance. It came to Andrius’ attention through Tay-K’s song which is say’s “shine like mega man”. Andrius thinks the reason he recognizes his artistic side with a brand is his geographical origin. Being on the edge of eastern and western culture and growing up in that sort of vacuum makes you think who and where you are and in what kind of historical period you live.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

“If you ask me what makes me do art, I will say: I don’t know!” says Andrius. When the search to find answers to his unknown questions pushed him to spend time in the silence and height of the mountains, what he found in himself, was his grandfather. He says his grandfather was always happy. He was a big role model for him. He sees a relation between happiness and having time.

Andrius did his academic studies in sculpture. During his studies he won the Baltic youth award in painting. The painting was the reduced and minimalized image of the grandfather’s bookshelf. With this achievement he won a residency in Norway.

His path of art style developed over the years. Small objects found their way to his paintings. The details of the paintings faded away and colors only stayed. He made bigger sculptures and smaller paintings. He experienced and flowed from 3 meters high painting to really tiny ones.

At the moment medium is not playing a big role in the identity of mgmn’s art work, it can be a mix of aerodynamics equation with a H&M t-shirt. What matters is the philosophical sight and point of view that he has in that time period.

Written by Elnaz Mostaan

images supplied by the artist


for more of mgmn’s work you are welcome to the following exhibitions:

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Cecilia Klementsson

Cecilia resisted becoming an artist for a long time, but in the end she realized that she was just rebelling against her family. They encouraged her painting. She says she was always busy drawing something as a child and always had her best marks in art classes with not much of effort. She opted for something more challenging: natural science. However, she found herself painting in all of her free time and picking art classes. It was then that she really noticed how much she enjoys it and couldn’t imagine herself doing anything else.

Life took Cecilia from Sweden to Australia and she started her studies in Fine Art in Perth. “The most isolated and the sunniest city in the world,” Cecilia says. In Perth the base of her current technique of painting formed: having four colours and applying one at a time instead of using a pallet to mix all the colours. Cecilia compares her style of painting with a printer in terms of applying each colour in separate layers. She really wants to extract all the colours that you see on the skin so they lay on the top of each other, like how the impressionists did. This is how she avoids painting dull or flat bodies. Her self-limitations gave her the challenge to go for painting meatier and fleshier instead of plastic images.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Painting nudes was always one of Cecilia’s favourites. Jenny Saville is a painter that Cecilia admires. She believes her journey from Sweden to Australia, and the difference of the attitudes towards nudity in these two country triggered something in her. As well she secretly laughs at the fact that she like to give a little back to women who paint nudes

She started looking at nudes in advertisements in more detail. How are they getting away with that much of nudity? Commercially being beautiful. but at the same time pale and innocent and not erotic. So she decided to take normal people and put them in perfect posing of advertisement. but not with the porcelain airbrush look. Instead they are fleshy and real. This was for her the indication that people are still beautiful despite the real magenta and green shadows their skin naturally have.

Another concept that Cecilia is playing around is that what happens when a man poses in a feminine way or even a trans woman poses in a masculine way. What is man? What is woman? Where is the line in this spectrum? Plus, the fact that masculine and feminine codes change throughout history. “There is a lot of gender attached to the pose, and the way someone act and the body language,” Cecilia says.

The fact that advertisement is selling sex doesn’t draw Cecilia to it. At the same time she acknowledges that it takes talent to create such a beautiful visual thing. She is also fascinated that contemporary advertisements are being more inclusive and representative with different shapes of body and skin colours. The ads she uses are generally from the 90s.

Come see how Cecilia crushes gender borders with her paintings. You will see her self-portrait posing like a male Calvin Klein perfume advertisement model and a trans woman posing as Eva Mendez in the final show of round 41.

Written by Elnaz Mostaan

images supplied by artist


You can find Cecilia’s art works in her website.

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00


Press while here at Pilotenkueche:

MEDIUM

Beyond ‘Hypezig’: Connecting international artists in eastern Germany
by Benedict Tetzlaff-Deas

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Magazine 43
Issue 8

Artist Spotlight: Tamara Jacquin

Tamara always starts her work with the human body, its senses and experiences. She is convinced that the human body carries both carnal experience as well as emotional heritage. In her work she explores human emotions and basic needs, whilst keeping in mind our natural bond with the natural world and need for a shelter.

The artist works extensively with natural landscapes, trying to bring them into the city environment. Hence materials used may be site-specific or selected to evoke and recreate a certain sensation. She works largely with wood, steel and silk, but also integrates plants and even her own hair. Tamara’s work is mainly three-dimensional, but includes photography and poetry. She believes that poetry is a great outlet of the soul and it helps to look deeply within. Tamara writes her own poetry and appreciates the works of Alejandra Pizarnik and Raúl Zurita.

Before turning to Fine Arts, she completed architectural studies. Though the artist found herself unhappy within the architectural field, there are clear traces of it in her art practice. A good representation of her personal journey is a series called “Body architecture” which showcases the process and struggles she accumulated in this quest as well as the questions she had posed. How do we build ourselves? What constructs us? Which constructions repress us? How do we navigate social canons; what society expects from a woman; all the standardised norms one must comply with in addition to the baggage of one’s family history.

Tamara searched for answers in nature. She used her art practice as an outlet to tell her story as well as to declare her artist manifesto. We are animals that come from the wilderness and we shouldn’t lose this bond with it. The artist continues to explore this question and is playing with an idea of a refuge. An intimate shelter that allows a person to think and connect with surroundings, earth, sky and oneself.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

When recounting her latest piece, she speaks of an inner sensation she felt when standing in front of a tree, that which cannot be described in words. Artists stresses: “You can feel it and not intellectually perceive it.” Her piece is a memory of an encounter with the landscape. When speaking of her artwork Tamara says: “It is a dream, it’s not a construct. As a dream it doesn’t have to be perfect!” Accordingly, her work has an airy quality to it, allowing space for free interpretation, encouraging the viewer to use their own imagination to awaken their senses.

Tamara says that she could easily spend a whole day in repose, simply visualising, thinking and examining a concept. When she has solved the puzzle in her head, she starts the execution. Tamara grew up as an only child and she spent a lot of time in her fantasy world, imagining things and playing on her own. Also, today her ideas are born in the same way; an artist desires to fuel the imagination of the viewer. This artist wishes to bring them closer to the nature, even if it is just in their own imagination.

photos supplied by artist

For more information and visual insight head over to Tamara’s website.

Lichtspiel des Westens

film: Entrepasos
Karl Heine
Saturday 7 December 2019
16.00 – 22.00

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: David Elias Schilling

David is back! He is a Vienna-based artist, born in Leipzig and has spent his founding years here. Now he is at PILOTENKUECHE, rediscovering and appreciating his home city with a fresh pair of eyes. After 12 years in Vienna, he is observing the changes that Leipzig has undergone. But he has also changed. He is able to use his accumulated knowledge to discover new facets of his childhood Leipzig. The adult David is finding this new perspective on the past a very interesting experience.

His Leipziger roots manifest throughout David’s work. Knowing his family history and that of the city, we can understand David’s art on a more personal level. He grew up near the coal mines and his grandfather was employed within the industry. David childhood was informed by stories of the coal quarries and exposure to the landscape on a daily basis. He praises the aesthetic power of quarries. “It is like a hurricane” he says, describing the visual impact of the “moonlike landscape”.

David is a painter, who has also received professional training in photography. Thus, occasionally he utilises both disciplines in his practice. He found that photography alone was too clean as a medium and limiting in certain ways, whereas in painting David was able to integrate the momentum, the energy and the movement that is present throughout the creation. He also mentions that the lines and shapes on the paper trace artists’ morphology, adding an additional quality. Therefore, David uses large formats as they give more space for physical freedom and an opportunity to interact with the piece in a bodily manner.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Although his approach to painting is very expressive, David is very attentive to the detail and thoughtful about the materials he chooses. The choice of medium is tightly knitted to his birthplace and early exposures. David’s paintings have a very graphic aesthetic to them, he’s work channels the métier of contemporary drawing. He paints almost exclusively on paper using charcoal, ink and graphite, producing high contrast images.
He prefers to work on paper as it is less eternal than canvas, outlining the value of the present moment. The use of charcoal is self-explanatory, but is not by accident why he uses solely a specific brand of ink. David says to have a nostalgic connection with the ink from Rohrer & Klingner (a company established in Leipzig in.1907). This ink was the top choice in schools, used by children to learn writing.

He is also a gardener. His love for botany was ignited when he was assigned a tiny corner in the family garden. His corner plot grew bigger and bigger with each passing year. Now he can proudly speak about his collection of flowers, particularly his wild roses. As a gardener David is enchanted by the change of season, especially the springtime when nature comes back to life out of nothing. He is equally fascinated by the seeds and their ability to stay dormant for decades, just to be awakened by the right circumstances. Currently, whilst back in Leipzig, David is researching plants that are reappearing in Leipzig’s old quarries.
Within his art practice he integrates motifs of flowers, plays with their symbolism and creates harmonious Ikebanas. He is intrigued by Japanese zen gardens as well as tea rituals and Japanese ink painting.

David is a curious person and a multifaceted artist. David adores opera, he will be the one who is humming or whistling a fragment from a classical piece. Currently he is smitten by Shostakovich 11th symphony, but obviously being born in Leipzig he had the love for Bach placed in his cradle. David is interested in Bach’s’ approach to composing, his use of mathematical principles, Fibonacci sequence as well as numerology. David tries to apply these techniques himself, he studies principles of harmony, but is mesmerised by contrasts.
He is attracted by Vanitas and recognises both the beautiful and the ugly, We need both. David says: ”It is life, there is dirt and it is beautiful!”.

David manages to interweave various disciplines, techniques, personal history and symbols in a surprisingly harmonic and balanced way, creating art pieces that complement each other and form a complete oneness. Though one doesn’t have to recognize the information embedded to appreciate aesthetics of his work.


images supplied by artist


See his work at the following shows:

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Open:
Sat 16 / Sun 17
Thur 21 / Fri 22 / Sat 23
14:00 bis 18:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig


Press while here at Pilotenkueche:

MEDIUM

Beyond ‘Hypezig’: Connecting international artists in eastern Germany
by Benedict Tetzlaff-Deas


Artist Spotlight: Travis D. Hendrix

Drawing is some sort of release for Travis. If he is stressed or off kilter, the process of using just a pen on the paper can reset his balance. That’s why he always carries at least one sketch book with him. Travis is a natural prodigy in drawing. The way he draws his lines confidently makes you think he is connected to an inspirational source, what he says assures this: “painting is like meditation for me.”

Travis was busy painting since he could hold a pencil. His mother has his art works documented since early childhood. While he has tried his hand at print making, sculpture, egg tempera and many other mediums, but he always comes back to drawing. He could easily say that art is his calling.

Travis made his profession academic, but after he made sure he had developed his own style and found confidence in it. “I was against the idea of going to an art academy for ages,” said Travis. He had seen many artists who had gone through academic art studies and that have had ruined their love of art and they started working in offices after that.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Architecture is a strong source of inspiration for Travis’ sketches, just as dreams are his muse for illustrating. He believes everything that happens to him during daily life gathers and assembles in dreams. This is where subconscious enters and makes a distinctive show. He places high value on dreams and wants to spend as much time exploring them as he can.

Mapping is another field that Travis is obsessed with. He explains, “Maps are from the very first means that human could use to understand and describe his surroundings.” Maps are like a common language for people, and Travis likes to communicate or transfer a feeling with his audience through his work.

Currently at PK, he is working on a series of maps from an unknown place. He believes maps can recall something in people from their historical memory hidden in their subconscious, especially when the map is produced from his subconscious and not necessarily from the reality outside. So with an art piece like that, people connect through a hidden chain and communicate on a Meta level.

Written by Elnaz Mostaan

images supplied by artist


To more of Travis’ work you can check his Facebook page, and of course you are welcome to the following exhibitions:

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Open:
Sat 16 / Sun 17
Thur 21 / Fri 22 / Sat 23
14:00 bis 18:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artists Spotlight: Lucy König

Lucy often complements monumental structures with delicate creations, showcasing her knowledge of materials, craftmanship and attention to detail. She has studied metal sculpture and though she truly enjoys working with metal, she found it limiting to observe the topics she is interested in, hence her work also integrates other materials and techniques such as embroidery, sewing, drawing and painting.

Lucy’s main interest lays in border areas of bodies. She views these zones as a representation of a second or a third layer of the skin. As an example, she points out how attached we are to the clothes we wear. We treat it as another part of ourselves in terms of self-expression, as well as our cultural influences. Lucy explores these regions as she sees it as a very sensitive and an important area, where interchange between an individual and the society happens. She remarks that the layers and borders somehow define and protect us, but also separate us from the rest of the world

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

When asked how she developed a deepened interest in the subject, she refers to the time spent studying in Istanbul. Lucy remembers not feeling particularly safe as a woman commuting during late hours. She recalls her domicile having protective bars in front of the windows. There was another set of bars in front of her terrace and an additional set between her and her neighbours. Then there was, yet another barrier enclosing the residence and its garden. She contemplates; “Being home and safe, being outside and being unsafe. Being home and wanting to be outside, but feeling safe and still having your own space.”
This led to her creating wearable pieces such as a whimsical jumpsuit made of bubble wrap. A piece that allows one to stay safe and meet their social needs. She laughs:” ..leave the comfort zone! You need to be alone sometimes; have no friends. It is necessary to get a character!”

Currently Lucy has begun to reflect on domiciles as bodies of a collective and the history they carry. She investigates border areas, but in a bigger scale, outlining the importance of biographies inserted within the habitat. She says: ”When we live somewhere, we put our own experiences and traces into the building. And the building and its architecture influences us and how we move and feel.” By playing with form and volume, she observes connection between the tenant, the embedded history and the architecture. Lucy is exploring the means to portray this relationship and to showcase the 2-way interaction she creates sculptural work that simultaneously outlines and references the initial object and exists independently. These art pieces are predominantly new objects, yet also a poetic reflection and a remembering of the archetype.

The work for the first PK exhibition, Reset unsettling flesh layers, is cross stitch on silicon and is suspended with metal rods. At first glance, it appears to be one tone. Closer examination reveals more than 28. When creating a painting, flesh is rarely a solid, but more a series of similar hues. Lucy has managed to represent skin and all it’s complexities, while at the same time highlighting its seeming simplicity.


More information about her practice can be found on Lucy’s website and Instagram.

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Ingrid Pumayalla

Ingrid has a special connection to the ancient roots of the earth. She is bound with nature, symbols and rituals. She has a specific sort of respect for shamans, knowing them not as witches but instead as the wise people who knew the knowledge of herbs and health and secrets of nature.

Her professional path took a new directlon when she was a student in university. She decided to stop studying business administration and redirect her time and energy to her old desire of being an artist. She purposely chose to study at a photography school in Lima, which was founded in 90’s and focused on psychoanalysis and photography. Now she had the time and insight to look and see what photography meant to her, conceptually and technically.

“Photography changed my state of mind and relationship with the world,” says Ingrid. The portrait project she did of her family, left her with a deep impact and some sort of internal emotional healing. Because her family are immigrants, she had to travel around to make a portrait of them. The experience was like putting bones of a body back together again. Migration is a painful phenomenon within Peru, the history goes back to 70’s when people from rural areas started going to big cities. Due to colonization, they have lost nature, language and this was with the feeling of displacement, violence, loosing identity and home. It is also important for her to contribute to preserving Quechua (Inca’s native language) as a Peruvian artist.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Her thirst for making art took her to London. She still works with Photography but her studies in M.A. of fine art opened a space for thinking even wider. “Not just clicking and see what comes out after, but also the process of photography, directing a photo and the dialog you can have with the space and all the surroundings in a photo including the performance in the course of the photography,” said Ingrid.

Ingrid’s Peruvian origins has her telling stories. She tells me a memory about a Shaman who gave her a cup of his potion and tell her “now I’m giving you the Art”. In shamanic culture Art means knowledge to heal and see yourself and your environment and find what you have lost. Going to a shamanic ceremony got her thinking, what those individuals were trying to find. In a post-colonial community, what have people lost collectively. It makes her question the active role of an artist in the position of having that “Art” in a society as a shaman in a community, this makes the fundament of her work, her concern and her quest.

Her enthusiasm for story telling furthers her works in making film. Currently Ingrid is doing photography and filmmaking alongside with other mediums such as wool, stones, woods and etc. for making installations and performances.

Here in PILOTENKEUCHE her project is a fusion of parallel methods specifically textiles and knitting skill from Quichuan culture and language, In a figurative narration of an oral story or a myth. The myth is about now and about the fires in the Amazon, 20 years of deforesting Peruvian Amazon, combined with the concept of migration and with the strong play of nature.

written by Elnaz

image supplied by artist


you can find out more about Ingrid on her website, and you can come down to the following shows to see more of what she is doing.

Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

performance: Ingrid Pumayalla

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Lichtspiel des Westens

Karl Heine
Saturday 7 December 2019
16.00 – 22.00

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig

Artist Spotlight: Natacha Martins

Natacha is an emotional painter and a confident performer. She who loves Jazz, birdsong, and finds dark techno to be the best for mixing paint. Natacha is deeply influenced by Modernism and the Baroque époque as well as Christian art. Natacha cites big names; Picasso, Matisse, Soutine, Van Gogh and contemporary artists such as Luc Tuymans, Louis Fratino, Alex Becerra, Daisy Parris, Antonia Showering, Stevie Dixx  etc. Currently she’s indulging and studying Francis Bacon. There are books of his work next to the easel and a play of liquid forms and hues of violet in her sketches.

Natacha’s work is highly self-reflective, and she chooses to share herself with the spectator. She pours her inner world and feelings onto canvas and boldly explores human vulnerability and fragility in her performances. She stands relentlessly strong for the absence of boundaries between life and art. – They are entangled: communicating, supporting, inspiring each other to construct what feels like her discourse throughout images. As a highly visual individual she needs to eat with her eyes, it is a physical urge to paint. This undeniable obsession with the imaginary manifests in a complete devotion to the practice. Artistic expression organically lives within an artist, so how one could separate this part of their own identity, caging it, denying it oxygen by taming it and taking it for a walk just occasionally? Natacha is confident, she knows that she is supposed to paint.

Photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

We talk with Natacha and Daniel in her working space at PK, about creating, but mostly about destruction. They both seem keen on destruction as a form of construction.
Daniel’s work is very geometric and mathematical, he deconstructs it down to a triangle, whereas Natacha’s approach is more sensual, and she refers to the metaphysical, the soul as the primordial form and intense irrational experiences coming from the very most intimate, allowing to reach primordial archaic human state embedded in an individual. She extracts the essence, uncovering our core values. To ask ourselves, to the communities, what do we stand for? We notice that the theme of destruction is being actualized and tackled from different angles by several participants of PK, perhaps a reflection of the happenings on a global scale. Damaged connections with nature, change caused by deforestation, mono-culture agriculture, irresponsible industrialization, excessive consumption etc.

Although Natacha defines herself as a painter, her performance piece “Crucificação e Deposição de Cristo (Crucifixion and Deposition of Christ)” serves as a strong artefact of her convictions. Natacha uses her body as a tool. After depriving herself of sleep for 3 days, she arrives at the exhibition space exhausted and in a half-conscious state. Then Natacha goes to dream, making herself a part of the artwork, exposed, fragile and undefended. Natacha says that she wanted to be there fully – as an artist, as an art piece and simultaneously displaying the fragility of the human condition. She Embraces the terminal devastation of life, resetting back to essential values and sometimes giving a rayon of hope.

In order to understand more about this artists start by Charles Mingus and Herberto Helder, then head to her instagram. Here’s her website.

written by Agnes

images supplied by artist


Reset unsettling flesh layers / vernissage / PK at AHS

Friday, 15. November 2019
19:00 bis 22:00

Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, Kleinzschocher, 04229 Leipzig, Deutschland

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness / vernissage / PK RD41

Saturday, 14. December 2019
19:00 – 22:00

PILOTENKEUCHE, Franz-Flemming-Straße 9, 04179 Leipzig