Category Archives: exhibitions

PK RD41: Upcoming Shows

The studio is alive with creative energy. All those who came to our Open Studios (Designers Open Spot) last weekend were able to see the work in progress and talk to the artists. Those who couldn’t, don’t fear. We have two shows coming up and each has its own special flair.

This exhibition represents the accumulation of ever-accelerating rhythms in the altermodern
world and the momentum of regeneration. A spiralling ascension of energy followed by the
shedding of skin and matter, folding backwards into grey foundations of urban displacement.
There is a convergence of ancient forests and radiant future seed particles, mapping
migratory paths through time and space. The body is but a site of irrational experience which
confronts the machines of carbon-heavy Modernity.
A Kali-destructive rampage of nihilism anticipates the coming still; hyper-sensitising rituals,
filament tensions and porous-smooth materiality of the posthuman condition. This is an
emerging non-state where the more-than-human world metamorphoses in perpetuum into a
new corporeal becoming. The uncontaminated hierarchs falter and drop from the sky.


Patricia Brien, Curator


Reset unsettling flesh layers 


vernissage:
Fri 15 Nov
19Uhr-22Uhr
performances TBA

open:
Sat 16/ Sun 17
14Uhr-18Uhr
Thur 21/Fri 22/Sat 23
14Uhr-18Uhr

Alte Handelsschule
Giesserstr 75


From nonmatter emerges poetic spaces of nothingness. This spatial emptiness waxes dark
mass and a new spiritual gestation. A coded dialogue is written in the deep seams of carbon,
bearing the deconstruction of material and nonlinear points of multiplicity. Sharp angles
mutate into gentle recesses, energised with the properties of light and the intimacy of a
dream.

The pleasure in the surge of viscosity, and the illusion of vulnerability creates a space
between people, an assemblage which orientates the human to positive kinetic chaos.

Patricia Brien, Curator

Overwhelmed incorporeal happiness

vernissage:
Sat 14 Dec
19Uhr-22Uhr
peformances TBA

open:
Sun 15 Dec/Tue 17 Dec/Wed 18 Dec
14Uhr-18Uhr

PILOTENKUECHE
Franz-Flemming-Str 9


PK RD41 International Artists


Wim Warrink (NL)
Daniel Domingo Schweitzer (ES)
Natacha Martins (PT)
Tamara Jacquin (ES/CL)
Travis D. Hendrix (AU)
David Elias Schilling (DE/ AT)
Cecilia Klementsson (SE)
Ingrid Pumayalla (PE)
Alison Hui (HK)
Mirjam Bürer (NL)
mgmn (LT)
Daniela Trinkl (AT)


PK RD41 Leipzig Artists


Nora Manthei
Lucy Koenig

CURATOR
Patricia Brien (AU/UK)


ASSISTANTS
Agnes Deruma
Elnaz Mostaan

Hungry Dungeon Friends Curatorial Tour

First and foremost, we’d like to thank everyone who packed the house for our Hungry Dungeon Friends vernissage at Kunstkraftwerk. The evening was one that still has people thinking nearly a week after. For those who missed it, the show is on until Sunday 1 September.

This Saturday at 3PM, our curator in residence, Colette Patterson will be giving a tour. Come find out what is behind the high quality works created by our International artists. We will also be gifted with a performance by Tom Austin.

Meanwhile, here are some images from the install and the vernissage shot by Stanley Louis, one of this round’s interns.

Hungry exchanges are often communicated through the affective fields of our bodies. The body-organism is linked to the world through a network of primal signifiers. An underworld of currents, there are some conversations that can only take place on the borders, on the edge of ourselves, of our contact with the other. The exhibition tries to circulate these borders, these textures, these interiorities, that are viscous, unformed, multiple and many times. We morph between states of consciousness, mapping unknown desires. This exhibition is the interim show of the Pilotenkeuche residents, and explores the possibility to traverse these spaces, inviting a tactile sensibility, and begs to ask what happens in a dungeon with friends? 

text by curator Colette Patterson


Hungry Dungeon Friends

Saturday 24 August
Curatorial Tour by Colette Patterson
performance by 
Tom Alexander Austin

open 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)– 

Review: Wrestling with Impermanence

One Greek myth tells the tale of the giant Antaeus, who had been granted a special power by his mother, the Earth. When anyone passed Antaeus’ land, he would challenge them to a wrestling match. If he began to lose strength, he had only to touch the earth and his  energy would be renewed. One day he was drawn into combat with the great hero Hercules. They fought and fought but Antaeus became no weaker. Finally Hercules discovering his vulnerability, grasped Antaeus, holding him high in the air, depriving him of his immortal gift, crushing him to death. Just as the Earth had once birthed Antaeus, she became the place in which he would finally decay.  

There is an intrinsic paradox evident at the heart of myth-making: the reality is forgotten so that the message can be remembered. The original story is always subsumed by the lessons that the teller wishes to convey. We learn the lessons of history but we forget history itself. Do we ever want reality or just a version of it that confirms our pre-held convictions? A myth is not a memory, and a memory is not the truth. Life is a series of events condemned to be mythologised or forgotten. Remember and re-imagine or forget and become extinct. 

‘Wrestling with Impermanence’ is an exhibition that marks the passing of time, records a present moment that will inevitably ascend into a memory, or perhaps a myth. The 14 artists of the 39th round of Pilotenkueche International Art Programme have spent the past three months engaging, exchanging and experimenting in the city. As the residency comes to an end the states of the permanent and fleeting are wrestled with.

The multifaceted notion of a cycle holds a strong voice amongst the artworks produced during the 39th round. Recycled materials are reverberant throughout the works, repurposing and reimagining  them to form new lives. Nature’s fruit acts as one of these recycled goods, whilst others use the sensations that the cycle of nature offers to draw inspiration. Time and history are also cycles reckoned with, some works only looking forward whilst others turn back. However, all artworks do hold one prominent commonality, their presence in the present. These works invite you to enter another cycle, one of remembering, or perhaps one of forgetting. 


all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Natural cycles dominate our existence; the harvest moon becomes the waning gibbous, the tide kisses the high water line morning and night, the hawthorn blossoms of early May become seed-laden berries poised to be pecked, digested and excreted: spread amongst the barren land, destined for germination when the warmth returns.

Like Antaeus, we ask the natural world for strength when we lose our power. We are living in a climate crisis. This is our reality and our future. The ice caps are melting, the great forests are being cut and burnt. Plastic is replacing sea life; monoculture is replacing diversity. The world is on its knees. This is our reality and not a myth. 

We must respond to the reality that surrounds us, and reflect the times that we live in. We must experience the present, in order to create the myths we may leave behind. We must embrace the natural cycle of impermanence, protect it and celebrate it.

So ask yourself. Mythologise, or forget? 

curatorial text by Clementine Butler-Gallie


Wrestling with Impermance

Vernissage Fri 21 June 7PM
Open Sat 22 June-Wed 26 June 1PM-5PM

Artists

International residents

Anabel Najera-Lopez (US)
sculpture
Coffee Kang (CH/US
installation
Cristina Prudente (IT/UK)
performance/installation
Daniel Long (KH)
projection mapping
Eliana Jacobs (CA)
video/installation
Izdehar Afyouni (PL)
painting
Jana Moser (AU)
painting
Kate Jones (US)
painting
Karine Fréchette (CA)
painting
Louis Bouvier (CA)
sculpture
Dominga Vergara (CL)
painting
Marijn Roos Lindgreen (NL)
installation/sculpture
Sabrina Jolicoeur (CA)
installation

Local Participants
Elisabeth Kraus (DE)
painting
Jos Diegel (DE)
painting

Curator
Clementine Butler-Galle (UK)

Assistants
Adrian Klaus Rotzscher (US)
book binding and creation
Ellisha Walkden-Williams (UK)
art history
Kristina Nizamova (CZ)
cultural event managment

Review: Elsewhere a Blue Line…

In the basement of an industrial power-plant in Kunstkraftwerk, visitors followed an imagined blue line through the murky labyrinth of exposed brick walls and blacked out spaces. In every corner there was a different narrative lurking amongst the shadows, just waiting to be told. Clementine Butler-Galle, round 39’s resident curator, begs the question  “Who defines a narrative?’ In Elsewhere A Blue Line And The Absurdity Of A Ghost On A Stone, she wanted to toy with our notions of storytelling. This idea was beautifully encapsulated in the exhibitions unique setting.

Anabel Najera-Lopez’s piece ‘Absence Presence’ told multiple narratives. Upon entering the second room the work sits strikingly under a spotlight. Flesh coloured fabrics morph together to portray a figural form, the reminisce spilling out to create a dramatic effect. Her work often explores notions of selfhood, however in this piece she considers collective identity. Her use of unwanted clothes, cumulated from the streets of Leipzig, tell the stories of past owners. Through the act of ripping the material apart and repurposing it, forgotten narratives converge to form a ‘new self’. 

Some artists explored their own narratives. Coffee Kang’s ‘The Star (part 3)’ is part of an ongoing mixed media project, displaying four wooden boxes. Each box represented a different city in which she has lived; Shanghai, LA, and Leipzig. Through the daily act of drilling holes into the wood, Kang explored the temporal faculties of place. 

Other artists evoked past narratives. In ‘She’s A Cult’, Izdehar Afyoui re-tells the historical portrayal of ‘Judith Slaying Holofernes’; a painting created by the early Italian Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi. Through this direct re-imagining of male pain and anger in the realm of narrative art production, Afyoui sought to highlight similar contemporary paradigms of displacement with regard to the continued exclusion of women from artistic discourse. 

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Jos Diegal, one of our local residencies, too channelled an art historical narrative. In his piece ‘LOOSE FILM ANTHOLOGY IN TWO DIFFERENT STATES OF MATTER (MADE BY PEOPLE GATHERING AND ARMED WITH CELLULOID)’, Jos replicates the filmic reflexivity of the early cinematic avant-gardes. The spectacular sculpture comprised of used film strips which hung suspended from the ceiling, were displayed in conjunction to a series of projected film images. The film was manipulated by scratching and painting over it to create distorted static effects. Through the art of  anti-illusion and anti-narrative (a technique propounded by early Structuralist Film theorists), Jos seeks to challenge established conventions of cinema and its ideological underpinnings. 

In a similar critique of the technological apparatus, Daniel Long, who specialises in the art of ‘projection mapping’, created an inbuilt structure of suspended windows inside of one of the remains of the old industrial site. The windows contained an array of wires, circuit boards and other skeletons of technological parts. Upon closer examination, you see a projected image of two figures. The footage tells a dismal, though not too unfamiliar, tale of two lovers disconnected by ipads and smartphones in the modern world. Filmed from outside a living room window to create the voyeuristic impression of ‘looking in’, viewers are forced to watch the inevitable breakdown of the relationship in the story’s denouement. 

Every artwork in the space had a tale to tell. Kate Jones’ work conjured imagined narratives of psychedelic planes or demonic fairy kingdoms. Eliana Jacob’s evoked the narrative of a Nation in order to signify the importance of collective memory and remembrance. Jana Moser’s organic forms tell tales of the natural world. Christina Prudente played upon on poetic narrative, referencing Edgar Allan Poe ‘The Conqueror Worm’. Some dialogues existed less overtly in the temporality of the works production. Marijn Roos Lindgreen ’s piece, for example, which was produced from paraffin wax, told the story of ‘Becoming Solid’.

Overall, the night was truly one to remember. If you missed the vernissage, don’t worry. The exhibition is on until 2 June as part of the Kunskraftwerk experience. Each day two of the artists will be in the space to chat. This Saturday, 1 June, our curator, Clementine Butler-Galle, will be on hand for a Curatorial Tour.

Written by: Ellisha Walkden


Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Curatorial tour with Clementine Butler-Galle: Sat 1 June 11.30AM-12.30PM
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

In Progress: Elsewhere a Blue Line……

Where is elsewhere? What does a ghost look like? Who defines a narrative? The artists of Pilotenkueche’s 39th round invite you to abandon inhibitions and trust in the absurd, to find a new line of narrative. Join us for the opening of Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone to see what’s been cooking in the ‘Pilot’s Kitchen’. 

The Pilotenkueche residency is not just a space of creative production, but a laboratory for cultural exchange. The artists of this round have taken many different routes to Leipzig, with artists arriving from Cambodia, China, Montreal, and the Texas-Mexico border, to name just a few. As the studios have transformed from empty white boxes to inspiration-filled tanks, the conversations surrounding the works in production have become equally laden with thought. Since arriving, the artists have organized weekly discussion groups, workshops, and art theory reading sessions. The positivity of group exchange can be felt in the spring air of the studios and subsequently echoes through each of the works produced for the upcoming exhibition. 

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Our cultural understanding is often based on the narrative in which we are told, a narrative that in turn can define an age. But what if we find the narrative that surrounds us does not fit with the way we see the world? Then get off the blue line and head elsewhere! The labyrinthine basement of the Kunstkraftwerk, a brand new venue for Pilotenkueche, will become the stage for the upcoming exhibition. No artworks will hang directly on the old brick walls, yet every corner holds something to be discovered. When stepping into a maze, we don’t reject wrong turns or dead ends, but instead, awaken a sense of curiosity through our disorientation. Each artwork on show offers its own narrative, but only you can define the route in which to find it.

Written by: Clementine Butler-Gallie


Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
35mm Filmworkshop with Jos Diegel Sun 19 June  2PM-4PM
Curatorial tour with Clementine Butler-Galle: Sat 1 June 11.30AM-12.30PM
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig


ReView: SPOOR

SPOOR /spʊə,spɔː/

noun
1. the track or scent of an animal.
verb
1. follow the track or scent of (an animal or person).

The aim of the final exhibition resulting from 37th round of the Pilotenkueche International Art Program is to raise the issue of being-in-the-world, bringing forth the notion of perception. It is “the background from which all acts stand out, and is presupposed by them”. We do not perceive isolated sense-impressions because we only see things as they relate. Our mental representations are formed by our previous experiences and future expectations. Art can capture the affective primordial contact that tends to go unnoticed. Artists are embedded and immersed in the tangible day to day world and assume a life of their own, opening themselves to metaphoric meanings by responding with forms, shapes, and colours.

Contemporary artistic process is not only about understanding technical formalities and introducing them in the art practice, but about the production of strangeness. Thus, contemporary art does not refer to a single determining judgment. In principle, the artistic process is not governed by rules and pre-established categories: these are what the artist seeks to discover and establish in their work. Contemporary art embraces sensibility – the artworks aim to capture the displacement of subjectivity through experiments and propositions that operate as a circuit breaker of the perception. It is a deflection of what is known.

all images by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

This plurality is present during the selection of artists for the program. The choices are based on the quality of their works, not in an a priori theme for each round. This means the relationships outlined between their poetics are subsequent and follow the uniqueness of the pieces produced during the residency. After three months, it is clear that all artists have sought to trace relationships with the city: its characteristics and found artefacts, each of them making their own way. 

text by curator Viviane Tabach


For the vernissage of SPOOR, Pilotenkueche was happy to host three musical performances. Violinist Izabela Kaldunska, originally from Poland,  played excerpts from her experimental work “The New Solarism”, along with some freshly created compositions. Classically trained as a pianist Elif Murat, originally from Ankara, Turkey, also presented some of her new electronic chill out pieces ‘Ellie M.’. Then the pair joined to perform as Ichor, a  collaborative project in which they compose electronic dance music. Just like the artists on the residency, Izabela and Elif  met in Leipzig.


SPOOR
14-19 Dec 2018

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty

In progress: SPOOR

It’s hard to believe, but we are currently getting ready for the final exhibition of the 37th round, SPOOR. The Dutch word “spoor” can be translated as track, trace, railway, trail, spur, mark, shadow, footprint, imprint, etc. 14 artists were chosen by open call to come to Pilotenkueche. They were chosen, not as a group, but on their individual works. 

Pilotenkueche became the hub that was their intersection. Many used the time here to experiment and try new things. Often these experiments were a result of what other artists were doing around them. They were also in reaction to their common environment: Leipzig.

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

How have the artists translated their perceptions of their experience here into pieces that the public can see? Will it be clearly visible to the viewer? Will you be amused, enraged, empowered, curious, saddened, pleased, transported? We hope you will be moved.

We are proud to announce that your experiencing of the artworks will be enhanced at the vernissage by musicians Izabela Kałduńska (violin) and  Elif Murat (piano) who will be playing original compositions singularly and electronic dance music as a duo.


SPOOR

Vernissage 
Fri 14 Dec 2018 7PM
Performance by Izabela Kałduńska begins 7.30PM
Performance by Elif Murat begins 8.15PM
Performance by duo begins 9PM

Open
Sat 15 Dec – Wed 19 Dec 5PM – 8PM

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

AHS speech bubble PK

Re-View: Rutschbahn and Speech Bubble

Marking the half way point of the artists’ time at Pilotenkueche art residency, Rutschbahn, the second exhibition of Pilotenkueche round 37, opened on Friday, the 16th of November 2018 at Krudebude.  Krudebude is an unusual exhibition space set in a “Wächterhaus” – a very Leipzig concept which provides apartments and other project spaces for inexpensive rent –. This made for a intimate and friendly atmosphere throughout the evening .

The 10 participating artists were encouraged to collaborate and make use of the space and its peculiar characteristics. This was particularly visible with Buket Savci’s work Hole of Mystical Desire, which was placed in direct relation with the remains of flowered wallpaper on one of the doors;  Jan Yongdeok Lim’s installation Smoke, which appropriated the coal burning stove in one of the rooms, and Reinhold Ponesch’s RIDE MY HORNS, placed just above one of the door frames in the entrance hall in reference to the traditional placement of mounted horns.

A great number of guests arrived as soon as the clock hit 7pm, and just an hour later, everyone gathered in one of the rooms to watch Reinhold Ponesch and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s collaborative performance IT CONCERNS YOU. This was Reinhold Ponesch’s and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s first experience with performance art. It was engaging to see how fiercely emotions were portrayed by the two artists. The audience was also positively taken by surprise when encouraged to participate.

We welcomed some familiar faces, previously spotted at the artists’ first exhibitionI Accept the Cookies – who were enthusiastic to see the development of the artists’ practice from  its first work-in-progress sneak peak. New faces kept on arriving until late in the evening, and the same was visible at the finissage last Thursday, 22 November 2018. Ann-Kathrin – one of the organizers of Krudebude – was positively amazed by the show, claiming it was one of the best so far at the space, both in quality and attendance.

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

Just a week later, on Friday, 23 November 2018, the third exhibition of the 37th round of Pilotenkueche – Speech Bubble – opened its doors. This was the first exhibition showcasing all 14 artists, marking local artist Georg Lisek’s first exhibition of the round with the display of Mask Variation, one of the two video works that could be seen in the show.

The evening began with a welcome speech by Barbara Röhner, owner of Alte Handelsschule and organizer of its exhibition space, followed by words from curator Viviane Tabach. For the curator, this show marks a turning point in the artists’ creative journey at the residency, where they can naturally invent their spaces within the large floor areas of the space, as well as its high ceilings. The artists finally have the freedom to exhibit some of the larger works that have been behind the studio walls, anxiously awaiting their moment. There was also space to develop site-specific work, as Luca Arboccò so rightly did. 

Before reaching the second floor where the exhibition takes place, visitors were surprised by flashing colours on their right as they walked up the stairs. As they followed this intriguing set of blue and purple lights, they found the first piece from the exhibition, No Broken Mirrors Shift Between Our Glance, by Nicholas Adamson. At first just a broken chair carefully laid on the floor, once the visitors moved closer and engaged in the space, they could see a mirror below the chair, reflecting an oil painting of a clown.

 

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

As the visitors continued up the stairs, they were intoxicated by the sound of Izabela Kałduńska’s music performance “The New Solarism” as they entered the exhibition space. Sitting in harmony amid Finn Curry and David Benarroch’s sculptures, the audience was treated to an hour long experimental performance that shifted between loops of classical violin arrangements and other sounds such as tearing paper, taps on wood and voice. 

Some visitors were noticed exploring the processes of Jan Yongdeok Lim’s Draainweg series through touch, which was interestingly unusual; others were intrigued by Barry Amey’s pieces and their reflection of colour on the wall, and curiously placed their hands behind the pieces to sense their heat – or as they then discovered, the lack of it – in an attempt to explore if they conveyed any light. For many guests, the most striking pieces were Julia Eichler’s Borderwallprototype I and II, for their materiality and playfulness; discovering they are relatively light, considering appearing heavy.

As the evening progressed, the guests grew comfortable – some sat in each corner of the room discussing the different works on view, and others laid on the floor next to Ai Ikeda’s piece Reassembling Matters, almost blending in with the ropes, kraft and waste papers.

These were two nights to remember and we cannot wait to meet again at the most awaited of all exhibitions –  the final one.

SPOOR
Friday, 14 December 2018
at the PK studio space.


Last chance to see Speech Bubble:
finissage Friday 30 Dec from 7PM.


Rutschbahn

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)

Local Artist:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Speech Bubble

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)

Curator:
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants:
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

speech bubble photo ines

In progress: Speech Bubble

Artistic endeavour can develop in a number of ways. However, it often follows a certain pattern. In the beginning one doodles and experiments with materials. Acutely aware of their surroundings, one must be open to experience in order to be inspired. There comes a point where there is something to say. This motivates the artist to use techniques old and new to create.

The artists of the 37th round are ready to talk! Speech Bubble opens Friday 23 Nov at the Alte Handelsschule. The voices of 14 artists join to create a chorus without losing their individuality. The large scale of the shabby chic auditorium has enabled the artists to work larger and the result is breathtaking. There are just a few final touches to make before it’s perfect for you.

all photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

We are pleased to announce that violinist Izabela Kałduńska will perform THE NEW SOLARISM at the vernissage. Although classically trained, in her new solo project she experiments with her instrument to find new ways of creating what she calls “dreamscapes.” Supported by a loop station, she will explore the tension between romance and darkness. 


SPEECH BUBBLE
PK @ Alte Handelsschule

facebook event

Vernissage: Fri 23 Nov 2018 7PM
Performance: Fri 23 Nov 2018 8PM
THE NEW SOLARISM by Izabela Kałduńska (Gdańsk, Poland)
violin, loop station

Open: Sat 24 Nov – Thur 29 Nov 1PM – 5PM
Finissage: Fri 30 Nov 7PM

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Ines Alberty

PK coordinator
maeshelle west-davies

In progress: Rutschbahn

With much excitement we are happy to announce we are almost ready for tomorrow’s vernissage of Rutschbahn. It’s been a busy week for sure, but preparation has been going on for much longer. I guess you could say that we’ve been preparing all our lives. 

Yes, anyone can learn skills, but few can allow themselves to be open to suggestion and create something from that. It is this gift that the artists of the 37th round have been using to get ready for Rutschbahn (German for playground slide). It is this childlike innocence that they’ve been able to tap into in order to climb the ladder and slide into the unknown.

photos by Pilotenkueche International Art Program

Challenged by the curator to interact and engage with  the unique space that Krudebude is, the works are often playful. Alongside that lightness comes precarity. Some in reaction to life experiences and others in response to the fine balance between stability and ruin that the space finds itself in. 

As Nicholas Adamson, one of the artists, so elegantly put it, 

The title ‘Rutschbahn’ invites one to ‘play’, or to return to an innocent state of mind. As artists, we engage in this uninhibited state when we create work. But at the end of the day, we ultimately must return to the so-called ‘real world’. This body of work navigates around these opposing visions to occupy the space in between work and dream, object and figment, and reality and fantasy. 


Rutschbahn // PK @ Krudebude

Vernissage Fri 16 Nov 2018 7PM
Performance Fri 16 Nov 2018 8PM
IT CONCERNS YOU by Reinhold Ponesch and Tamaki Kawaguchi

Open Sat 17 Nov – Wed 21 Nov 5PM – 8PM
Finissage Thur 22 Nov 2018 7PM

International Artists
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)

Local Artist
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Curator
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Graphic Design
Elias Emtanes

PK coordinator
maeshelle west-davies