Category Archives: documentation

GRATEFUL PARK: PK RD40 final show

How do we navigate and develop our own ecologies of care? We are currently faced with economic models that devalue and obstruct care; producing subjectivities that drive the current climate crisis and the on-going disruption/destruction of ecosystems, displacing both humans and other-than humans. With blatant disregard for the embodied knowledge these ecosystems cultivate and nourish.

This final exhibition of the 40th round of PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program residents aims to be a space to rethink forms of operating in the individual and collective spheres. Grateful Park reflects the outcome of some of these processes, articulating how we find ourselves embedded in an environment.

Through a cultural and affective exchange that creates systems to nurture, support one another and grow, the studios at PILOTENKUECHE build a shared ecology. This ecology lives in-between, influenced by the social and environmental, therefore catalysing possibilities to recalibrate our idea of individual and collective care practices.

Support structures can reflect how care labour is undervalued
under capitalism
. As artists, we might bring visibility to invisible acts of care and also how we might approach care as something creative, as a way of reinventing its place or value in work/ life/ art relations. Perhaps we open up questions around how care is done and who does it. The diversity of the works in the show Grateful Park is testimony to the myriad of questions we are faced with in our current political and environmental crisis. The residents create and inhabit new constellations.

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage:
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM

performances:
Tom Austin
Adam Tuch
LIS

open:
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM

location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9
04179 Leipzig


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)–

Hungry Dungeon Friends

There are some conversations that can only take place on the borders of ourselves; in contact with the other. The exhibition, Hungry Dungeon Friends, circulates around these borders and interiorities. They are viscous, unformed, multiple and representative of our hybrid nature.  

Through the hybrid format of the PILOTENKUECHE  International Art Program, there are possibilities to realign ones practice and be exposed to new environments, like the dungeonesque basement at KKW which offers a unique stimuli. Exchanges can be marked by a need, a hunger communicated through the affective fields of our bodies.  The body-organism is linked to the world through a network of primal signifiers, our bodies’ raw data

Like in the Deffractionist writings of philosopher, Karen Barad, in this project the pollination between practices and processes of the artists seeks to frame how “we cut together apart.”  The work explores intimacies and edges of collapse, dialogues about method, stages of unconscious and conscious action. How and what inhabits these points of exchange? PILOTENKUECHE offers a space to challenge temporal and spatial constraints.

In an enhanced awareness of these possible exchanges we question and reconfigure understandings. Hungry Dungeon Friends seeks to look into our entanglements in a myriad of ways. Conceived in an underworld of currents, it is a form and place where thinking intervenes in the more than human worlds.

Theorist Donna Haraway’s work highlights the figuration of these broken boundaries and imploded worlds, where knowledge and ontology dissolve. As a species we need to collectively reimagine new forms of empathy and understanding. In turn, this allows the developing of methods of care and extends the notion of what relating is, in order to confront humanity’s 21st century human exceptionalism. 

written by Curator in Residence Colette Patterson


Hungry Dungeon Friends

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

Live performances by 
sound artist Isaac Magner with film maker Agathe Barreand performance artists Antonia Wetzel, Tom Alexander Austin and Simon Schäfer.

events:
Saturday 24 August
Curatorial Tour by Colette Patterson

Live performance by 
Tom Alexander Austin

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM Tue-Sun

location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str.


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)– 

Hungry Dungeon Friends Curatorial Tour

First and foremost, we’d like to thank everyone who packed the house for our Hungry Dungeon Friends vernissage at Kunstkraftwerk. The evening was one that still has people thinking nearly a week after. For those who missed it, the show is on until Sunday 1 September.

This Saturday at 3PM, our curator in residence, Colette Patterson will be giving a tour. Come find out what is behind the high quality works created by our International artists. We will also be gifted with a performance by Tom Austin.

Meanwhile, here are some images from the install and the vernissage shot by Stanley Louis, one of this round’s interns.

Hungry exchanges are often communicated through the affective fields of our bodies. The body-organism is linked to the world through a network of primal signifiers. An underworld of currents, there are some conversations that can only take place on the borders, on the edge of ourselves, of our contact with the other. The exhibition tries to circulate these borders, these textures, these interiorities, that are viscous, unformed, multiple and many times. We morph between states of consciousness, mapping unknown desires. This exhibition is the interim show of the Pilotenkeuche residents, and explores the possibility to traverse these spaces, inviting a tactile sensibility, and begs to ask what happens in a dungeon with friends? 

text by curator Colette Patterson


Hungry Dungeon Friends

Saturday 24 August
Curatorial Tour by Colette Patterson
performance by 
Tom Alexander Austin

open 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)– 

PK RD40: Upcoming shows

HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

Hungry exchanges are often communicated through the affective fields of our bodies. The body-organism is linked to the world through a network of primal signifiers. An underworld of currents, there are some conversations that can only take place on the borders, on the edge of ourselves, of our contact with the other. The exhibition tries to circulate these borders, these textures, these interiorities, that are viscous, unformed, multiple and many times. We morph between states of consciousness, mapping unknown desires. This exhibition is the interim show of the Pilotenkeuche residents, and explores the possibility to traverse these spaces, inviting a tactile sensibility, and begs to ask what happens in a dungeon with friends?

text by curator Colette Patterson

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM

Live performances by 
sound artist Isaac Magner with film maker Agathe Barreand performance artists Antonia Wetzel, Tom Alexander Austin and Simon Schäfer.

events:
Saturday 24 August
Curatorial Tour by Colette Patterson

Live performances by 
sound artist Isaac Magner with film maker Agathe Barreand performance artist Antonia Wetzel and Tom Alexander Austin

open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM Tue-Sun

location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str.


GRATEFUL PARK

How do we navigate and develop our own ecologies of care?

Through a cultural exchange, that creates systems to nurture and grow. The studios at Pilotenkeuche become spaces for recreational play, temporal support structures manifest. This final exhibition of the residents aims to be a space to rethink forms of operating in the individual and collective spheres. Grateful Park reflects the outcome of some of these processes, articulating how we find ourselves embedded in an environment.

text by curator Colette Patterson

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage:
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM

performances: TBA

open:
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM

location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9
04179 Leipzig


PK RD40 

International residents

Adam Tuch (sound, digital art, installation/US)
Agathe Barre (film/FR) 
Antonia Wetzel (performance, painting/DE)
Ariel Taylor (painting/US)
Clément Bedel (painting/FR) 
Christopher Sperandio (comics/US) 
Darien Crossley (performance, painting/US)
Helene Planquelle (painting, drawing/FR)
Isaac Magner (sound design, video/UK) 
Michella Perera (sculpture/UK)
Tom Alexander Austin (performance/UK)
Vernon O´Meally (painting/US)
Zara June Williams (painting/AU)
Zheng Wenxin (painting/CH)

Local Participants
Matthias Geisler (painting, printmaking/DE) 
Simon Schäfer (sculpture, film, sound, installation, digital/DE)

Curator
Colette Patterson (UK)

Assistants
Fiona Irene Graf (DE/UK) 
Huai-ya Lin (TW) 
Silvia Zandomeneghi (IT)
milkafterfish (instagram)
Stanley Louis (HA/FR) 
iam_stanlouis (instagram)– 

Artist spotlight: Hélène Planquelle

“Artists have to ask themselves: Does my art matter in respect of my death? Does it change something? Does it speak to somebody? Does it make a difference?.” Questions like these are the guiding precepts by which Hélène Planquelle works. Heavily influenced by her humanities studies, Hélène’s practice centres upon philosophical principles concerning subjects like social interaction and responsibility for the other.

The Constitutive Other, a term coined by Hegel but later revisited and revised by the 20th century philosopher Emmanuel Lévinas, stands in immediate relation to Hélène’s visual concept. The phenomenological notion of the ‘Other’ is concerned with the identification of the Self through the distinction from another human being – the ‘Other’ becoming a bedrock analogue of the Self –  as well as with the moral liability towards the ‘Other’ in a face-to-face encounter. 

Lévinas also spoke of Original Violence, a term which describes the idea of violence being created during our first contact with another person. “Before you are encountering another person, you are living in your own bubble of self-centered reality. It de-centers you and forces you to take another human being into account in your life, you can’t just dismiss the reality of this other person’s existence,” Hélène expounds.


Hélène’s meticulous, almost photorealistic drawings and oil paintings are a manifestation of her fascination with these matters. Her works often depict two people in direct, physical interaction: they grab, strangle, carry each other, are entangled and intimate, tender and violent. They tell us of the indiscernible, underlying power struggles within a relationship. 

Recently, Hélène has began to work on a new series of paintings called “Where Is Your Brother?.” in which she investigates the concomitance of nurturing love and resentment or even hatred within fraternal relations. Here, the idea of brotherliness is to be understood in a broader sense: it describes the care and responsibility we carry towards the ones that are close to us, our neighbours, our fellows in misery. 

Hélène draws inspiration from the famous biblical story of Cain and Abel. The first offspring of Adam and Eve and the first tale of the first fratricide in the Christian history of creation, Cain murdered his brother Abel out of jealousy. Religious context is evident throughout Hélène’s pictorial language. Deliberately dramatic and staged, her drawings and paintings conjure up comparisons to famous religious Renaissance and Baroque paintings and sculptures. Her often undraped figures pose in submissiveness, they enact their inner yearning, their ecstasy and agony. Strong sexual references run through her entire body of work. 

Although ever so delicately executed, Hélène’s drawings and paintings also convey a rawness, brutality even. “They relate to the basic theories of attachment.” Hélène explains. They act as an echo of our most primal experiences, of the initial event of being torn apart from the origin: the womb of the mother. The involvement with this painful, almost cruel process of leaving the nurturing and protecting maternal body, to becoming a separate entity forced into unattached existence, is reflected in Hélène’s imagery. The arising narratives tell us of life, in its most intense forms.

written by Fiona Irene Graf

images supplied by the artist


See Hélène’s work in the upcoming exhibitions

HUNGRY DUNGEON FRIENDS

vernissage: 
Saturday 17 August 
7PM-10PM
open: 
Sunday 18 August – Sunday 1 September 
10AM-6PM (closed Mondays)
location:
Kunstkraftwerk
Saalfelder Str. 8
04179 Leipzig

GRATEFUL PARK

vernissage: 
Friday 20 September
7PM-11PM
open: 
Saturday 21 September – Monday 23 September
1PM-5PM 
location:
PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program
Franz-Flemming-Straße 9

Review: Wrestling with Impermanence

One Greek myth tells the tale of the giant Antaeus, who had been granted a special power by his mother, the Earth. When anyone passed Antaeus’ land, he would challenge them to a wrestling match. If he began to lose strength, he had only to touch the earth and his  energy would be renewed. One day he was drawn into combat with the great hero Hercules. They fought and fought but Antaeus became no weaker. Finally Hercules discovering his vulnerability, grasped Antaeus, holding him high in the air, depriving him of his immortal gift, crushing him to death. Just as the Earth had once birthed Antaeus, she became the place in which he would finally decay.  

There is an intrinsic paradox evident at the heart of myth-making: the reality is forgotten so that the message can be remembered. The original story is always subsumed by the lessons that the teller wishes to convey. We learn the lessons of history but we forget history itself. Do we ever want reality or just a version of it that confirms our pre-held convictions? A myth is not a memory, and a memory is not the truth. Life is a series of events condemned to be mythologised or forgotten. Remember and re-imagine or forget and become extinct. 

‘Wrestling with Impermanence’ is an exhibition that marks the passing of time, records a present moment that will inevitably ascend into a memory, or perhaps a myth. The 14 artists of the 39th round of Pilotenkueche International Art Programme have spent the past three months engaging, exchanging and experimenting in the city. As the residency comes to an end the states of the permanent and fleeting are wrestled with.

The multifaceted notion of a cycle holds a strong voice amongst the artworks produced during the 39th round. Recycled materials are reverberant throughout the works, repurposing and reimagining  them to form new lives. Nature’s fruit acts as one of these recycled goods, whilst others use the sensations that the cycle of nature offers to draw inspiration. Time and history are also cycles reckoned with, some works only looking forward whilst others turn back. However, all artworks do hold one prominent commonality, their presence in the present. These works invite you to enter another cycle, one of remembering, or perhaps one of forgetting. 


all photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Natural cycles dominate our existence; the harvest moon becomes the waning gibbous, the tide kisses the high water line morning and night, the hawthorn blossoms of early May become seed-laden berries poised to be pecked, digested and excreted: spread amongst the barren land, destined for germination when the warmth returns.

Like Antaeus, we ask the natural world for strength when we lose our power. We are living in a climate crisis. This is our reality and our future. The ice caps are melting, the great forests are being cut and burnt. Plastic is replacing sea life; monoculture is replacing diversity. The world is on its knees. This is our reality and not a myth. 

We must respond to the reality that surrounds us, and reflect the times that we live in. We must experience the present, in order to create the myths we may leave behind. We must embrace the natural cycle of impermanence, protect it and celebrate it.

So ask yourself. Mythologise, or forget? 

curatorial text by Clementine Butler-Gallie


Wrestling with Impermance

Vernissage Fri 21 June 7PM
Open Sat 22 June-Wed 26 June 1PM-5PM

Artists

International residents

Anabel Najera-Lopez (US)
sculpture
Coffee Kang (CH/US
installation
Cristina Prudente (IT/UK)
performance/installation
Daniel Long (KH)
projection mapping
Eliana Jacobs (CA)
video/installation
Izdehar Afyouni (PL)
painting
Jana Moser (AU)
painting
Kate Jones (US)
painting
Karine Fréchette (CA)
painting
Louis Bouvier (CA)
sculpture
Dominga Vergara (CL)
painting
Marijn Roos Lindgreen (NL)
installation/sculpture
Sabrina Jolicoeur (CA)
installation

Local Participants
Elisabeth Kraus (DE)
painting
Jos Diegel (DE)
painting

Curator
Clementine Butler-Galle (UK)

Assistants
Adrian Klaus Rotzscher (US)
book binding and creation
Ellisha Walkden-Williams (UK)
art history
Kristina Nizamova (CZ)
cultural event managment

Artist Spotlight: Kate Jones

Chains suspend a mattress from the ceiling. Paintings of pinks, purples and deep reds surround me. I am sitting in Kate’s studio. But don’t be fooled. They depict dystopian nightmares of sacrifice, torture and dark fairy kingdoms. Taxidermy, or ‘re-purposed dead matter’ as she calls it, is strewn amongst the chaos of paint and paint brushes. Kate’s atelier is an enclosed space of rampant creative exploration.

She begins to tell me about her interests in esotericism and occult mythologies. This often forms the basis of the subject matter of her work as well as influencing her methods of production. Kate tells me that her technique is indicative of automatism – a Surrealist term which denotes subconscious expression. Her paintings are often completed in a trans-like state in which she uncovers information from a more celestial source.

The South-Carolinian born artist spent most of her life back and forth from California, with the exception of completing her undergrad at the School of Visual Arts in New York. Describing her aesthetic as very ‘Californian Macabre’, she tells me how her work is influenced by her surroundings. She uses the term ‘Genuis Loci’- a shamanic term of Latin origins, literally translating to ‘the spirit of the land’.

Often undertaking research in the form of ‘field work’, so to speak, this then informs her practice, and at times, becomes part of the work itself. She tells me of some video work she created at the Isis Oasis Lodge in Northern California using an analogue camera. The old-cult is now a non-profit and an animal sanctuary which carries out Egyptian rituals and religious ceremonies devoted to the Egyptian goddess Isis.

She continues to tell me of another trip to the former home of Alistair Crowley at Abbey of Thelema, Cefalu, Italy. Crowley was a mystic and occultist, infamous for his school of ‘magick’ and semi-satanic rituals. The space was used as a commune by him and 5 other artists, who painted many disturbing images on the walls. In 1923 Mussolini expelled Crowley from Italy and the murals were to be painted over. But in the 1980’s an avant-garde occult filmmaker named Kenneth Anger stripped the walls to reveal the paintings once again. Kate painted her own work on the walls; describing the result as a kind of ‘astro- collaboration’ between Crowley, Mussolini, Anger and herself. ‘It was like a forgotten piece of art history which I asserted myself into’, she comments.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE International Art Program

Most recently, Kate visited the town of Quendlinburg, which resides about an hour away from Leipzig, on the foothills of the Harz Mountains. The festival of Walpurgisnacht takes place every year during Beltane, or the Spring equinox. Folk magic and early modern witchcraft remains prominent in the cultural landscape of the region. Although she describes the festival as a kind of elaborate Halloween carnival, her work is highly indicative of the iconography of witchcraft, and it place within post-modern society.

Witchcraft is historically conflated with social deviance, promiscuity and anti-establishment. Today the complexities of gender politics are rifer than ever. With constant battles against social and institutional inequality, the notion of the witch has struck a chord with the modern woman. Kate is interested in exploring ways in which the archetype of the witch can be used to empower notions of femininity.

As the first group exhibition at Kunskraftwerk is rapidly approaching, what can we expect from Kate? Her work continues to explore the numinous realms of ritual and occultism through both painting and video work.  She’s also interested in exploring the ontological premise of her work. Stylistically, her painterly technique is quick, loose and expressive. She likens this with impermanence, forging a link between the temporal faculties of the art object with the decay of matter.

Now we know where the taxidermies come in.

Written by: Ellisha Walkden

_________________________________________________________________________________________

You can see Kate’s work in the following Pilotenkueche International Art Program shows:

Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

Wrestling with Impermanence 

Vernissage: Fri 21 June 2019, 7PM
Open: Sat 22 – Wed 26 June 2019 1PM-5PM
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
Performance: To be announced

Artist Spotlight: Marijn Roos Lindgreen

Is the space rigid or rather plastic? Where is the border between inside and outside? What would happen if outside became inside and inside became outside? Those and many other questions are addressed by Marijn Roos Lindgreen, Netherlands based artist, in her sophisticated installations.

My work is focused on the immediate space, space that is directly around us. It’s something that happens all the time. It’s impossible not to be in the space. I am curious how you can influence this feeling of being in the space. When I come somewhere, I try to understand how I feel there. Then I try recreate this experience of a space in my art work”.  

Marijn comes from the field of architecture. After she finished high school, she was determined to do something creative, but at the same time technically orientated. Thus, Marijn obtained her Bachelor’s degree in architecture at Technical University of Delft. Later on, during her Master’s she specialized in Interior Architecture, which she studied at Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam. “Architecture definitely had a big impact on my art work. It not only made me think of how people relate to space in general but also it made me more conscious about how I experience space myself”.

Although she really enjoyed studying architecture, Marijn felt that what she wanted to do was a little bit too crazy for this field. She was always more into constructing utopic and futuristic buildings rather than practical ones. Today in her art practice she combines theoretical concepts of architecture and philosophy as well as real life examples. Marijn likes working with figures and forms that we are all familiar with and using them in unusual, sometimes unexpected ways, but she also wants people to interact with her art within the space. For instance, in one of Marijn’s installations visitors were invited to go through doorways that had to evoke in them the feeling of entering the space without actually entering it.

Marijn also likes to play with different materials, starting from plexiglass, pigment, to sand and wood. The choice of materials depends on what fits best each project. In the upcoming exhibition she will be dealing with the topic of transparency and wax is going to be her main material. She chose wax for its flexibility but also for its temporality. “In my art practice I often work with the opposites. Therefore, I like materials that are both solid and breakable. I like to see how it can change over time”. During her residency at Pilotenkueche Marjin will be deliberating on how she can make something that can exist as a single object in a space.

It’s quite difficult to predict what the outcome will look like. Marijn belongs to those young artists who are still in process of discovering and experimenting with styles and techniques. “I would say I am still searching for my personal style. However, my work becomes more and more consistent with every project. Now I am more satisfied with the final result as it reflexes the initial idea I had in mind. Besides, I get a lot of positive comments on my art work from public lately”. Being an emerging artist, Marijn doesn’t yet know how your career will develop in the future. But one thing is for sure – she doesn’t want to be placed in the gallery or museum permanently. She prefers people encounter her work in more natural setting.

written by Kristina Nizamova

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

You can see Marijn’s work in the following Pilotenkueche International Art Program shows:

Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

Wrestling with Impermanence 

Vernissage: Fri 21 June 2019, 7PM
Open: Sat 22 – Wed 26 June 2019 1PM-5PM
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
Performance: To be announced

Artist Spotlight: Christina Prudente

I like jumping from one place to another. There are not boundaries for me. This might be applied both to my lifestyle and art practice.” After 25 years in Sicily, Christina Prudente decided to start a new chapter in her life and find a new place she could call home.  She spent some time in San Francisco and then relocated to London, UK. London’s dynamic and blooming culture scene is probably what led Christina to arts. Everything began with a short drawing course Christina was attending while working as a lawyer.

Suddenly Christina quit her job and started attending Kingston University, where she first got her Bachelor and, then, Master’s degree in fine arts. However, for a long time her art work didn’t have any link. When she was creating something, Christina just tried to explore the possibilities of “creation” in a time’s vacuum without notion of past and/or future. People were telling her to focus on one technique and find her personal style, but she didn’t feel this way. Instead, Christina adopted the mindset of the Arte Povera, a contemporary art movement from Italy. Artists that refer to Arte Povera believe that the link is the artist themselves.

“I enjoy working with every type of media and different kinds of concepts. I appreciate the art of freedom, because my previous occupation didn’t give that freedom. The whole day I was sitting in the office, doing boring paper work and couldn’t express myself. Now my art work fully responds to who I am.”

In Christina’s opinion, the country, where an artist lives/lived/came from naturally influences his or her work. “Human experience is what inspires me. In my art work I like to reflect social issues that modern society is currently facing. I worked with such topics as war in Afghanistan and Iraq, society control, equality, human rights and so on. I think it was some kind of a transition from a lawyer in to the artist”.

Christina also draws her inspiration from other artists’ work. Michelangelo Pistoletto, Bill Viola and Gerhard Richter are some of her favorites. Currently she is working with selected poems of Edgar Allan Poe and trying to respond to them in her new art piece she is going to present at Kunstkraftwerk. In the upcoming exhibition, she will be using different media such as mirrors, photos, video or music. So we definitely have something to look forward to.

And what are Christina’s plans for the future after her residency at Pilotenkueche is finished? She is always on the move and she is not going to stop. Since she successfully exhibited in Tokyo last year, now Christina is trying to organize a new exhibition in Korea. We will see where wanderlust will bring her. Maybe it will be a birthday party at the North pole or an art residency in Namibia. Time will tell.

written by Kristina Nizamova

_____________________________________________________________________

See Christina’s work in the following Pilotenkueche International Art Program shows: 

Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

Wrestling with Impermanence 

Vernissage: Fri 21 June 2019, 7PM
Open: Sat 22 – Wed 26 June 2019 1PM-5PM
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
Performance: To be announced

Artist Spotlight: Coffee Kang

Coffee Kang is an artist encompassing many different worlds, all moving and shifting seemingly under her feet but she takes it in stride. It’s all impermanent, all part of the process. Having moved from China to Los Angeles to complete a Masters in photo media from the California Institute of the Arts she is now based in Southern California where she focuses her body of work on varying situations – how do we change spaces, how do spaces change us and how does culture affect these changes? As she creates meaning through her work we are invited to ask our own questions: how does process inform meaning? What is the importance of performance in relation to achieving a specific goal? These themes come up in Coffee’s time-based works, and so much more.

As she navigates her personal narrative using photo media, video and primarily performance centered pieces, the temporality of the medium helps to inform her personal and cultural historicity while trying to connect to a grander whole. This fluctuation, or state of flowing, relates back to how we move in certain spaces and how our culture affects perception as well as physical space. In this connection comes an exploration of inherited culture, identity and the power of the individual within a system.

While Coffee’s work changes in form it is comfortably placed within a tradition of performance and process, ultimately landing somewhere in the conceptualization and activities of Fluxus. In this established mode of creating ‘process matters more than the result’. This is the crux of the meaning making. It is not about a product, or even some intangible end result. More important, here, is the journey in the making. The performance or action is not to achieve something but to do something.

photos by PILOTENKUECHE or courtesy of artist

These ideas are brought to life in her past works and performances, most notably in her temporal work The Funeral, wherein she performed a funeral for a previous piece. This work, titled Days in the Matchbox, was sentenced to death by a necessary move from her studio. In this way the artist created meaning out of a daily life stressor. She used the end result of moving out of her studio as a catalyst for meaning making through performance while reanimating an older piece for one final action.

In her seemingly permanent state of impermanence, or ‘current of changing’, Coffee Kang finds herself in Leipzig amidst a group of international artists all creating their own meaning within the context of the host city and more specifically within the Pilotenkueche artist residency. In this light the themes she works with can shine – they can flourish not by providing answers but by leading viewers and participants through the construction of purpose that happens within a group, within a new city, within the very process of critical thinking in both art making and art viewing.

In an attempt to explore her subconscious self, she will be looking to the stars that hang above Leipzig and the White Elster river that cuts through it. By connecting with the water flowing through the city she connects with all of the different bodies of water she has resided near, by connecting with the stars she connects not only to her inner self but to all of us that reside beneath them.

written by Adrian Klaus Rotzscher

_____________________________________________________________________

See Coffee’s work in the following Pilotenkueche International Art Program shows: 

Elsewhere a Blue Line and the Absurdity of a Ghost on a Stone 

Vernissage: Sat 18 May 2019, 7PM
Open: Sun 19 – Sun 2 June 2019, 10AM – 6PM (closed Mondays)
Location: Kunstkraftwerk, Saalfelder Str. 8, 04179 Leipzig

Wrestling with Impermanence 

Vernissage: Fri 21 June 2019, 7PM
Open: Sat 22 – Wed 26 June 2019 1PM-5PM
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
Performance: To be announced