Author Archives: Inês Alberty

Artist Spotlight: Yuuki Horiuchi

Yuuki Horiuchi was born in 1990 in Nara, Japan, and lives and works in Tokyo. During her childhood and teenage years, the artist enjoyed reading comic books and watching movies, and still does up to this day. In Japan, comic books are addressed to all age groups and come in many different formats, such as literature, in the shape of novels, as pornography. They can be sources of entertainment  or an expressive way of narrating historical facts. Also, the comics and animations whose target are teenage females – named ‘Shōjo manga’, after the meaning of ‘young girl’ in Japanese – are deeply related to feminism. The stories and characters in these books are usually influenced by Japan’s social and cultural background, and Yuuki understands them as a result of a big whirlpool of destiny.

The artist sees the moment of becoming conscious about death as turning point in her life. She is familiar with both western and eastern philosophers, recently identifying with Baruch Spinoza’s Sub specie aeternitatis – «an honorific expression describing what is universally and eternally true, without any reference to or dependence upon the temporal portions of reality». Also interested in matters such as time, past and future, the universe’s progression, shamanism and faith, the artist reflects on the circle of life, destiny, coincidence and inevitability. She is aware that human life and the present are fundamentally dependent on external factors, just like the characters in the comic books she reads.

“There was the past, and with it all the past events that happened regardless of my potential choices;  there’s the present, with happenings that are the result of chances and choices of my own;  and there’s the future, which remains an open book of uncertainty regarding what may or may not happen. And for me, this is a reminder that I am a fragment of this world and that most of the things are uncontrolled”, she describes.

For Yuuki Horiuchi, this is the starting point of her understanding of human life and, consequentially, of her production, which is intrinsically visible in most of her past works. More recently, the artist began pondering the relationship between these different life occurrences, their resulting emotional consequences and the way they are visually depicted in most comic books, often recurring to mnemonics.

all photos by Pilotenkueche Art Program

Yuuki Horiuchi became fascinated with how incredibly well portrayed the characters’ expressions are – weather expressing happiness, surprise, sadness or anger – and how easily one can comprehend the characters’ emotions before one starts reading the actual story. For the artist, it is possible to illustrate meaning through simple graphics. She is currently exploring the importance of shapes and graphic forms as a direct influence in their narratives, from the pages’ composition to the speech bubbles included in it. The artist investigates the recurring patterns and symbolisms present in comic books and attempts to bring them into her fine art practice.

Instead of reproducing the standard appearance of a comic book – filled with stories, figurative images and flat colours – the artist reproduces solely the layout of the page using both organic and geometric shapes in shades of gray and blue pastels. These resemble translucent spaces entirely devoid of matter, and the speech bubbles particularly allude to the cosmos. The investigation is done through oil painting, although the artist dares to paint as one would with watercolour. This resemblance of the watercolour technique is even more evident in the artist’s paintings on paper, in which the marks dissolve fluently and unpredictably throughout the surface. When working in monochrome, this dissolution can also resemble etching. Yuuki Horiuchi is interested in discovering the different ways of how the audience receives these graphic elements in painting, as more layers are added through the use of brush strokes and fluid mediums.

Yuuki Horiuchi holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from the Fine Arts in Tokyo University of the Arts, in Japan, and has also completed an exchange programme at Glasgow School of Art, in United Kingdom. The artist has taken part in many artistic residencies, such as The Central Saint Martins’ Associate Studio Programmes (Y-AIR Exchange), in London and Youkobo Art Space (Y-AIR Exchange), in Tokyo, both in 2018. She was awarded a place at the Art Project Ideas 2017 exhibition, in Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan, and Video Field was her last solo exhibition, at Youkobo Art Space, in Tokyo.

text by Viviane Tabach and Ines Alberty

You can see Yuuki Horiuchi’s work in the four upcoming shows of round 37.

SPEECH BUBBLE

Finissage: 30.11.18 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

SPOOR

Vernissage:  14.12.18, 19h
Open:  15 – 20.12.18 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

AHS speech bubble PK

Re-View: Rutschbahn and Speech Bubble

Marking the half way point of the artists’ time at Pilotenkueche art residency, Rutschbahn, the second exhibition of Pilotenkueche round 37, opened on Friday, the 16th of November 2018 at Krudebude.  Krudebude is an unusual exhibition space set in a “Wächterhaus” – a very Leipzig concept which provides apartments and other project spaces for inexpensive rent –. This made for a intimate and friendly atmosphere throughout the evening .

The 10 participating artists were encouraged to collaborate and make use of the space and its peculiar characteristics. This was particularly visible with Buket Savci’s work Hole of Mystical Desire, which was placed in direct relation with the remains of flowered wallpaper on one of the doors;  Jan Yongdeok Lim’s installation Smoke, which appropriated the coal burning stove in one of the rooms, and Reinhold Ponesch’s RIDE MY HORNS, placed just above one of the door frames in the entrance hall in reference to the traditional placement of mounted horns.

A great number of guests arrived as soon as the clock hit 7pm, and just an hour later, everyone gathered in one of the rooms to watch Reinhold Ponesch and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s collaborative performance IT CONCERNS YOU. This was Reinhold Ponesch’s and Tamaki Kawaguchi’s first experience with performance art. It was engaging to see how fiercely emotions were portrayed by the two artists. The audience was also positively taken by surprise when encouraged to participate.

We welcomed some familiar faces, previously spotted at the artists’ first exhibitionI Accept the Cookies – who were enthusiastic to see the development of the artists’ practice from  its first work-in-progress sneak peak. New faces kept on arriving until late in the evening, and the same was visible at the finissage last Thursday, 22 November 2018. Ann-Kathrin – one of the organizers of Krudebude – was positively amazed by the show, claiming it was one of the best so far at the space, both in quality and attendance.

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

Just a week later, on Friday, 23 November 2018, the third exhibition of the 37th round of Pilotenkueche – Speech Bubble – opened its doors. This was the first exhibition showcasing all 14 artists, marking local artist Georg Lisek’s first exhibition of the round with the display of Mask Variation, one of the two video works that could be seen in the show.

The evening began with a welcome speech by Barbara Röhner, owner of Alte Handelsschule and organizer of its exhibition space, followed by words from curator Viviane Tabach. For the curator, this show marks a turning point in the artists’ creative journey at the residency, where they can naturally invent their spaces within the large floor areas of the space, as well as its high ceilings. The artists finally have the freedom to exhibit some of the larger works that have been behind the studio walls, anxiously awaiting their moment. There was also space to develop site-specific work, as Luca Arboccò so rightly did. 

Before reaching the second floor where the exhibition takes place, visitors were surprised by flashing colours on their right as they walked up the stairs. As they followed this intriguing set of blue and purple lights, they found the first piece from the exhibition, No Broken Mirrors Shift Between Our Glance, by Nicholas Adamson. At first just a broken chair carefully laid on the floor, once the visitors moved closer and engaged in the space, they could see a mirror below the chair, reflecting an oil painting of a clown.

 

photos by Pilotenkueche  International Art Program

As the visitors continued up the stairs, they were intoxicated by the sound of Izabela Kałduńska’s music performance “The New Solarism” as they entered the exhibition space. Sitting in harmony amid Finn Curry and David Benarroch’s sculptures, the audience was treated to an hour long experimental performance that shifted between loops of classical violin arrangements and other sounds such as tearing paper, taps on wood and voice. 

Some visitors were noticed exploring the processes of Jan Yongdeok Lim’s Draainweg series through touch, which was interestingly unusual; others were intrigued by Barry Amey’s pieces and their reflection of colour on the wall, and curiously placed their hands behind the pieces to sense their heat – or as they then discovered, the lack of it – in an attempt to explore if they conveyed any light. For many guests, the most striking pieces were Julia Eichler’s Borderwallprototype I and II, for their materiality and playfulness; discovering they are relatively light, considering appearing heavy.

As the evening progressed, the guests grew comfortable – some sat in each corner of the room discussing the different works on view, and others laid on the floor next to Ai Ikeda’s piece Reassembling Matters, almost blending in with the ropes, kraft and waste papers.

These were two nights to remember and we cannot wait to meet again at the most awaited of all exhibitions –  the final one.

SPOOR
Friday, 14 December 2018
at the PK studio space.


Last chance to see Speech Bubble:
finissage Friday 30 Dec from 7PM.


Rutschbahn

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)

Local Artist:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)

Speech Bubble

International Artists:
Ai Ikeda (Montreal, Canada)
Barry Amey (Cornwall, UK)
Buket Savci (NYC, USA)
David Benarroch (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Robert Finn Curry (Madison, Wisconsin, USA)
Jan Yongdeok Lim (Utrecht, Netherlands)
Luca Arboccò (Turin, Italy)
Mihyun Maria Kim (Edmonton, Canada)
Nicholas Adamson (Winnipeg, Canada)
Reinhold Ponesch (Vienna, Austria)
Tamaki Kawaguchi (Osaka, Japan)
Yuuki Horiuchi (Tokyo, Japan)

Local Artists:
Julia Eichler (Halle, Germany)
Georg Lisek (Leipzig, Germany)

Curator:
Viviane Tabach (São Paulo, Brazil)

Assistants:
Elias Emtanes (Leipzig, Germany)
Ines Alberty (London, UK)

Artist Spotlight: Mihyun Maria Kim

Mihyun Maria Kim is a painter. The idea of the painting itself is meaningful for her because it is both the process and the outcome: it alludes that its end is not necessarily defined. It is through this ambivalence that she also explores the place between the encounter and the separation, the integration and the isolation.

She depicts portraits, figures, faces, whose main theme is the human connection. Maria Kim looks through her personal photos to find randomly captured people. She may not know them, but the fact that they shared the same space and time gives her an entry point to discover a potentially valuable moment. The stories she investigates can be her own – where she draws from memory – or can be a story told to her by her family and friends. From this, Maria Kim connects the past to her current situation, struggle or emotion and reinterprets it in order to dig deeper into the reason she has accessed it.

Photos are the starting point for Maria Kim’s works, but she never looks at them during the process. She let them intermingle with her surroundings, “to be more influenced by information through news, research, writings, books, so that I free the mind and emotions of my own visual world to come alive”, she describes.

all photos by Pilotenkueche Art Program

She allows herself to be carried away by her thoughts so that her body moves with a certain weight and energy which can be seen in the brushwork, choice of colors, the size of the work and how controlled the situation is for painting. The dark color palette and the expressive brushstroke are remarkable in her work.

All the subjects and contexts Maria Kim paints relate to who she is as a painter. The figures she paints can be seen as her own representation. Her painting process is her own self-knowledge process. The time of painting is also a time of reflection and the reinvention of a memory. The anonymous character of a possible encounter gains an intimate form, at the same time, the painting seems to be reduced to a non-place and timeless state. Taken to the extreme, it is the creation of a background for new memories.

At the beginning of her career, she was influenced by the Austrian painter Egon Schiele, for his raw lines and use of negative space; the German Expressionists who distort the use of colour, space, and scale; sculptors as Magdalena Abakanowicz with hollow figures and surface texture, and more recently Claudia Alvarez with her rooms of ceramic children and their piles of shoes. Her current influencers are Maja Ruznic, Xin Ye Cheng, Kaye Donachie, Grace Metzier and Genieve Figgis. With her recent move to Edmonton in Canada, she wishes to further understand the rawness and depictions of both Julian Forrest and Kim Dorland.

Since 1998 Mihyun Maria Kim has been selected to several art residencies, such as Can Serrat and AIRGentum, in Spain and CAMAC (Centre d’Art Marnay Art Centre), in France. At Pilotenkueche, the artist aims to move on to larger paintings and also to group the smaller paintings for viewing as it has this element of a search for one that one can recognize him/herself in.

text: curator Viviane Tabach


You can see Maria Kim’s work in the four upcoming shows of round 3 7. 

I ACCEPT THE COOKIES 

Vernissage: 01.11.18, 19h
Open: 02.11 – 04.11.18 17-20h
Location: PING PONG, Helmholtzstraße 1, 04177 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

RUTSCHBAHN

Vernissage:  16.11.18, 19h
Open:  17-21.11.18 17 – 20h
Finissage: 22.11.18, 19h
Location: Krudebude, Stannebeinplatz 13, 04347 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

SPEECH BUBBLE

Vernissage:  23.11.18, 19h
Open:  24 – 29.11.18, 17 – 20h
Finissage: 30.11.18 19h
Location: 
Alte Handelsschule, Gießerstraße 75, 04229 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event

SPOOR

Vernissage:  14.12.18, 19h
Open:  15 – 20.12.18 17h-20h
Location: PILOTENKUECHE, 2nd Floor, Franz-Flemming-Str. 9, 04179 Leipzig, Germany
facebook event